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MANUAL, 



ANALYTICAL AND SYNTHETICAL 



OETHOGEAPHY AND DEFHITION. 



nUKOXFAL or TBS MECIUNICS' lOCXSTT BOBOOL, NBW TOIS. 



NEW YORK: 
MARK H. NEWMAN & Co.. No. 199 BROADWAY. 

1846. 



iTHr 
PUBL- 






/'J' 



ACTOR , LFNOX a: ID 
TILOEN FCI \ DAT IONS 

1908 




■8 tvicoRA A« aidJLxoauaxfl 



•jjiojj^ Ma|^ JO piJiBTQ tuaqjnog 

'uoDiTiapH *iz saxyr n uncMaAi 'h xhyx 
iq '9^1 xwX 0q) ui SMoSaoQ jo py <n >ui t> J W>wt ^zaHUiia 



PEEFACE 

TO THE FIRST EDITION. 



I SUBMIT, with the greatest deference, thk volume o£ Exercises to thost 

engaged in the business of education, content with little beyond a brief 
statement of the most important features of the plan of instruction pursued 
therein. 

The plan, then, requires each exercise to be toriUen ;* and thus engages 
the eye as well as the ear in the study of Orthography, while, at the same 
time, it serves to improve the pupil in penmanship. 

It renders necessary a due application of the Rules for Spelling ; and so 
familiarizes the mind with those circumstances, under which, in the fbir- 
mation of derivative words, letters are- so frequently omitted, inserted or 
exchaoged for others. 

It obliges the student to compare words, variously related, one with 
another ; teaching him, in this, the most efiectoal way, to mark and mind 
tliose delicate distinctions, both in sense and sound, upon which accuracy 
and elegance in the written expression of thought, mainly depend. 

It resolves derivatives, as also compounds, into their elements ; explains 
the parts, both separately and in combination, and thus evolves their literal, 
or primary meanings. Going beyond this, especially in relation to those 



* Should any one prefer that cotirse, the Exercises may all be condacted orally. To written 
Exercises, however, I have never heard but one objection urged, and that is, that they wonld 
ediaast Coo mach of the teacher's time in making corrections. This is a great mistake. If 
written In a clear and legible hand, as they always should be, experience will soon prow 
this objection to be utterly groundless. But supposhig additional time to be required, li 
there not more than a fair equivalent for this in the additional advantage T 



M: 



Ti FRSFACE. 

derivatives that admit a number of prefixes, it points ont the connectioB 
between the primary and the other significations, and so trains the mind to 
habits of accuracy in logical deduction. , 

It offers, as might thence be inferred, the best possible substitute for the 
fixrmal and regular study of the Classics ; since, while, in the text, nothing 
is introduced that can embarrass either the teacher or the scholar, who is 
acquainted with no other than the English language, it puts both in posses- 
sion of some of the chief advantages derivable firom the study of Greek 
and Latin. 

Finally, it leads to such inquiries into the meaning and application of 
words of all classes, as cannot fail to make the pupil acquainted with many 
&cts and principles«most useful to be known, yet seldom, if ever, acquired 
lii the ordinary course of academical instruction. 

JT. N. M. 

2Veio-rarA:,Fe&., 1845. 



NOTE TO TEACHERS 

IN RESPECT TO THE PROPER MODE OF USING THIS BOOK. 



As a natural consequence of the favor* everywhere shown to the 
'< Analytical Manual/' hy able and experienced instructors, the 
present edition comes forth carefully revised and extensively improved. 
Among other things, have been added, both in the text and in Nons, 
numerous observations and suggestions designed to facilitate the use 
of the book in schools. These, at least, by the younger members of 
the Profession, should be carefully read : which being done, every 
thing, I think, of the nature of doubt and difficulty, as to the proper 
tnode of conducting the exercises in the recitation-room, will imme- 
diately disappear. Other means of illustration, additional, periiaps 
preferable, will no doubt suggest themselves to many. To suck I 
have only to say, (using for that purpose the oft-quoted words of Hbxw 
ace,) what to all may be said, respecting the entire work : — 

' Si quid notitti reetius iatis, 
Candidus imperU; ri non, Am tttere meeum. 

J. N. M. 
New York, Nov., 1845. 

* See RieoHMENDATioNB ut the end of the vohmie. 



MANUAL 



ORTHOGRAPHY AND DEFINITION. 



SECTION I. 

INTRODUCTORY OBSERVATIONS. 

As all experience testifies that certainty and readiness in spelling, 
is the result of frequent and long-continued practice in writing, or 
otherwise actually fornmig words by their proper letters, every exer- 
cise in this book is arranged and designed to be written out, and pre- 
sented to the teacher for criticism and correction. If the paper or 
slate be properly ruled according to the models ; if the words be 
plainly and neatly written in regular columns ; if, in short, the per- 
formance be made an exercise in penmanship as well as in orthogra. 
phy, not only will the advantage be double to the learner, but the task 
of the teacher in the way of examination and correction, will be com- 
paratively short, easy and agreeable. To the written, also, may be 
added, with special benefit to the younger pupils, the ordinary oral ex- 
ercise ; while the Rules for Spelling, which apply with a frequency 
and accuracy surprisingly great, will, if duly . observed, lend most 
inuportant aid in the gooaeral desiffn. 

by far the more difficult and delicate task, however, is to expose 
and properly impress the true import of words. To effect this, in re- 
lation to those that are radical, they are here presented in several 
ooints of view : sometimes formally defined ; sometimes placed, for 
ihe purposes of comparison and contrast, in juxtaposition with words 
ijonveying the same or an opposite signification ; sometimes explained 
\n immediate connection with others alike, or nearly alike, in form and 
sound, but altogether different in meaning. 

The import of the radicals being known, it remains to ascertain 
what variations of meaning are afforded by combining prefixes and 
suffixes with them in the formation of derivatives, and by uniting 
words one with another in the production of compounds. For this 

Eurpose, all, or nearly all, the prefixes and suffixes employed in Eng- 
flh, are carefully defined, and the force of each in combination 2- 

2 



10 AKALTnCAL MANUAXm 

histrated by a suitable example ; while tbe permanent compcnmdfly 
which are, for the most part, of classical origin, and confessedly hard 
lo be understood by the mere English scholar, are also resolved into 
their elements and thus easily explained. All this is done with little, 
or no reference, in the text, to other languages ; with which, indeed, 
both teacher and pupil are here supposed to be wholly unacquainted. 



SECTION n. 

PRIMITIVE, OR RADICAL WORDS. 

Those are properly primitive, or radical words, that have their ori- 
in no other words.* Their number is comparatively small. 

ley serve, however, as roots, from which circumstance they derive 
their name, whence, by means of particles prefixed and suffixed, arise 
an almost countless multitude of derivatives. Thus from the simple 
ibrm, act, we have act^, AcUngf action, actor, active, activeZy, act- 
wity, actvaja, Aduated, Actual j so, ra-act, co-act, enact, overact, 
counteract, transBiCi, exROt. Again, in the words ab;ec^, conject, de- 
jectf eject, inter;crt, project, reject, sub;ec/, we find the radical part, 
ject, the same throughout. 

Now, between these two radicals, act and ject, there is one point 
of diflference, which must be specially noted, since it forms the basis 
of an important classification. It is this : — ^the word, act, may be, 
and often is, used by itself, as a separate and independent word, while 
ject, the other radical, can never be thus separately employed, but 
must always appear, as above, in union with some modifying particle. 
Upon thid difierence, is founded the division, in this work, of radicals 
into SEPABABLE and insefarable. For the sake of distinction, the in- 
separable radicals, when set apart from their proper prefixes or su£. 
fixes in the fi>llowing pages, are printed in liaMcs : when not thus 
separated, the entire word is presented in the ordinary type. 



SECTION III. 

PREFIXES AND SUFFIXES. 

The English language has a number of si^ificant particles, which, 
when combined with radicals, serve, as before intimated, to modify 

< HiiB is the strict and proper sense of the term. For the sake of convenience, 
bowever, the word, radical, is not unfrequently used to designate any word, thos 
irill admit a prefix or suffix. 



*iLlULTnCAL lUKUAL. '11 

their import. These particles are called prefixes and suffixes, and 
derive their names, as is plain, from their position in respect to the 
words with which they are found connected; — the prenxes heing 
joined to the heginning, and the suffixes added to the end of the radi- 
cal. Thus, in the words ^fall, rewrite, d?>like, unwise, mtmame, 
he, re, dis, un, mis, are prefixes ; each affecting, with a well-ascer- 
tained force, the word with which it is united ; while, in harmZeM, 
powerfuZ, aadly, and goodness, appear the suffixes, less, ftd, ly, and 
ness, having each its own peculiar modifying effect. 

It is, moreover, no uncommon thing to find a radical comhined with, 
and affected hy, several prefixe# or suffixes at once. To illustrate :— • 
the word equal, upon receiving the suffix, ixe, hecomes eqmliie, and 
means, to make equal ; add to this the particle ed, and we shall have 
eqn&Uzed, which signifies did make equal : where, he it observed, each 
of the suffixes in the combination, that is, ize, \to make,] and ed, fdid,! 
exerts upon the radical its own peculiar force. So, on the other hand, 
in the word recanjoin, is furnished an example of a primitive word, 
under the joint influence of two prefixes, re [i^ain] and eon [together,] 
the signification of the word reconjoin being, to join iogetker again. 
Two or more particles thus combined, form what may, for the sake of 
convenience, be called a compound prefix or suffix. 



SECTION IT. 

DEFDOTIONS. 

The experienced necessity of embodying in some brief form of 
words, those facts and principles that are frequently to be stated, sug- 
gests the propriety of placing here, in the shape of definitions to he 
comadUed to memory hy the ptipil, several things already explained or 
mentioned in the ])rec^ing Sections. 

I. 
A EADicAL WORD is ouc that derives its origin from no other word ; 
as, rore, rare, man. • 

II. 
A SEPABABLE BADicAL is One that may be used without being united 
with a prefix or suffix ; as, name, act, wise. 

m. 

An inseparable radical is one that always appears in union with 
a particle prefixed or suffixed ; as, dorm [to sleep] in the word dor* 
ject \to cast] in r^ect. 



13 AKALJnCAL HAHVAL* 

IV. 

PabucIiKS, in the present application of the word, are those signifi* 
mnt letters or syllables, commonly called prefixes and suffixes, which 
are united with words to modify their meaning. 

V. 
A PREFIX is a particle placed before a radical, and in union with it, 
to vary or modify its signification ; as, misguide, conjoin. 

VI. 
A SUFFIX is a particle affixed to a radical, to vary or modify its sig- 
nification ; as, feBLrless, thoughtful. 

vn. 

A coMFOUin) PREFIX OR SUFFIX is one composed of two or more sim- 
ple ones ; aSyVeccmjoin, professionaZ/y. 

VIII. 
Dbbivaiitb words are those formed by tiie union of prefixeis and 
suffixes with radicals. 

IX. 
CoMPOXTND WORDS are those composed of two or more simple ones ; 
as, shipwreck, nevertheless. 



SECTION V. 

RULES TO BE OBSERVED IN FORMING DERIVATIVE WORDS BV 
MEANS OF SUFFIXES. 

In fiirming derivatives by means of suffiixes, the pupil will soon find, 
thaty in many instances, something more is required than merely to 
write the puts together as one word. Thus, if we desire to affix the 
particle ed to the word suffer, we have only to unite, without change, 
the suffiix with the radical ; as, suffered. If we take prefer, which 
seems, in every respect, a case similar, the final letter, r, will be 
doubled, as, preferred. Again : if we add a suffix, as, ed or ingy to 
the word glory, we shall have, in the first case, to change the final y 
into I, as, gloried ; while, in the second case, the y must remain un- 
changed, as, glorying. If, instead of glory, we had taken the word 
employ, the fmal y woidd have undergone no change in either case ; 
the proper forms being employed, employer. 

These and other changes of like nature, the pupil will oflen have 
to make, in preparing his exercises ; and, as they are not made at 
irandom, but, for the most part, in strict accordance with known Rules, 
the Rules are given below, in concise form, that they may be easily 



ANALYTICAL JfAlTOAL. IS 

learned and applied. Readiness in their application, however, can 
Tiever be acquued by merely committing them to memory. They 
abould be fully and repeatedly illustrated on the blackboasDi hefort . 
they are committed. 

The mode of doing this, is very simple. Take, for instance, Rule 
VI. under which comes the word prefer, which, as we have seen, 
sometimes doubles its final letter on receiving a suffix. 

Prefer-ed ft5" Preferred 

Here show him that all the conditions of the Rule meet. Prefer 
has the accent on the Itut syllable-Mt ends with a mgU oonaooaiit 
[r] — ^that consonant is preceded by a sir^h vowel [e]---end, finally, 
ihe suffix begins with a vowel [e]. He is now prepared to answer the 
question : ''Why in adding ed to suffer, which is a case apparently 
like prefer, do you leave the final letter single, while in the latter in- 
stance, it is doubled ?" Ans. " Because, in ihe word suffer, one eon* 
ditian of Ae Rule is vfanUng : — the accent being on the Jirst^ not oa 
the last syllable.'^ 

A little practice of this sort, repeated every day for awhile, varied 
of oourse to suit circumstances, will soon render the meaning and ap- 
plication of all the Rules clear and eagy. In this way, regular for- 
mations will be made familiar, analogies learned and excepticHis 
marked, which, though most important to be known, are seldom duly 
observed. 

The notes on the Rules, are designed to point out several excep- 
tions. They should, therefore, be as carefully learned as the Rules 
themselves. li^ however, in the following pages, any change or ex- 
ception is to be made in adding a suffix, which is not mentioned either 
in the Rules, or the Notes of this Section, it will be specially noted, 
where it occurs. 

Rule I. 

The final 6 of a radical word, is usually rejected, when the suffix 
eommenoes with a vowel ;* as, move-ing, moving : sale-able, salable : 
pleue-ure, pleasure. 

Rule II. 

The final e of a radical word, is generally retained, when the suil 
fix commences with a consonant ; as, hope-less, hopeless : movc-ment, 
movement. 

* Obsbkve, that e final, when preceded by c or g, is not to be rejected before a 
suffix beginning with a or o ; as, peace-able, peaceable, peacea6fy .- coura^e-otu, 
coorageoiw, canngeousnesg. 

OflnKVE, ajBrain, that, when immediately preceded by tf or o, it is to be retained 
before the suffix ing; as, fe^-ing, feeing, shoe-ing, shoeing. In a few cases, alsOv 
it ii rejected, where the suffix does not begin \rith a vowel; as, dicd-ly, dnly 
tme-th, truth, truly. 



14 AHAITTICAL MANUAL. 

Rule III. 
Words ending in aU, drop the letters te belbrp the suffix cy ; as^ 
priva^oyy privacy. 

Rule IV. 
Words ending ant or erU^ lose the t upon receiving the sufi&x ce, or 
ey ; aa, verdant-cy^ verdancy : eminen^-ce^ eminence. 

Rule V. 
The final consMiant of a monosyllable, if preceded by a single 
vowel, is doubled before a suffix beginning with a vowel ; as, bag-age, 
baggage : qpot-ed, spotted. 

Rule VI. 
The final oOlMonant of any word accented on the last syllable, if 
preceded by a single vowel, is doubled before a suffix beginning with 
a vowel ;* as, debar-ed, debarred : occur-ence, occurrence. 

■ Rule VII. 

The final consonant, when not preceded by a single vowel, or when 
the word is not accented on the last syllable, remains single upon the 
addition of a suffix ; as, spoil-ing, spoiling : sufi^-ed, sufi»red. 

Rule VIU. 

The final i of a radical word, is omitted when the suffix begins 
with i; as, alkali-ize, alkalize : ^i^ism, deism. 

Rule IX. 

The final ^ of a radical word, when preceded by a consonant, is 
generally changed into t, upon the addition of a suffix ;f as, happjr- 
nesB, happiness : storj^-ed, storied. 

Rule X. 

The final y of a radical, when preceded by the letter f, is generally 
rejected before a suffix beginning with a or o ; as, purity-an, puritan : 
feUcity-ous, felicitous. 

* Obseevk that a condition, not expressed in the rule above, bot alwayi implied, 
!■, that the accent, in the derivative form, shall still continue on the final ayllable of 
the radical : thus, refer', by the Rule, gives, with ible added, refer'rible ; but, in tho 
toon referable, where tho accent falls back upon the first syllable of the radical, the 
r remams single. 

t OauRVE, that, in a few instances, the final y is changed into e, before ens and 
iti eompoundBt as, beauty-ous, beauteous, beauteou^Zy. « 

OmuvE, farther, that, as y is often changed into t, so t is Bomethnes changed into 
«. Thus, fai adding the tennination ing to such words as die, fie, lie, if the final jt 
be dropped according to Rule I. we sl»ll have the forms dt-tng, ts-tn^, It-ing. T« 
fmvent the doubling of i, in inch cbms, therefore, the i of the ndioal put di^ m 
cMnged into y / 4^> 4^» 4f^* 



AXALTnCAL MAOTAIm 10 

Rule XI. 
The fiaal y of a radical word, when preceded by a vowel, or when 
the su£Sz iqpns with i,* remains unchanged; as, bujf-er, buyer: 
gIory*tng^ glory-ing : baby-ish, babyish. 

Rule XII. 
. Words ending in/ or fe, oonunonly change / into o, when a suffix 
\ is added beginning with a vowel ; as, mischie/lous, mischievous : 
I wi/e-es, wives. 

/ Rule XIII. 

/ Words ending in er or or, often drop the e or o, before a. suffix 
' ocmunencuig with a vowel; as, victor-ix, victrix: wonder-ous, woiu 
drous* ' 

' Rule XIV. ^ 

Words ending in 2s, preceded by a cons(»iant, drop these letten 
upon receiving the suffix ly : as, Bble-lj, ably ; idie-ly, idly. 

Rule XV. ^ 

Words ending in hie, before the suffixes Uy and ides, take i between 
the letters h audi; as, able-ity, ability, abilities. 



SECTION VI. 

THE SIMPLE SUFFIXES. 

T%e design of this Section is to exhibit the farm and farce of each 
of die simple suffixes. To familiarize the eye with their forms, they 
are printed in capitals ; while the words used to express their force, 
that is, to define them, are made to appear in Italics. For the sake 
of illustration, each, also, is combined with a radical, and the deriva* 
tive thus formed, explained by connecting the definition of the suffix 
with that of the radical, or with the radical itself. 

The definitions of the suffixes must be thoroughly committed to 
menoory. They will be fbund to apply, in most cases, with little or 
no variation. Occasionally, however, slight changesf of expressicm 

** OssiKVE, howerer, that, in some instances, where the suffix begins with t, the 
final V of the radical is rejected; as, eulogy-ist, eulogist: sympath^r-ize, S3rinpathiae. 
t Thus, the form of expression most generally employed to define ize, the first 
anffix ezplahied hi this Section, is, to make. But, though the predominant foroe of 
this partide be everywhere the Mme, and thouffh that force may, for the most port, 
be well enongfa eipraned by the phrase, to make, instances may be found, in whieh 
it win prove less soitaUe than some othen that wiU very readily occur. Take th* 

to mike, k e. toeflfesM or wtrthip st n idoL 



16 



ANALTnCAL KANUAL. 



will be required to meet particular oases, which a very little practice 
will enable any one to make with the greatest facility. In addition to 
the examples given below, the teacher should collect and presenti for 
further illustration, as many more as may be convenient. If this sug- 
gestion be duly acted upon, the mode of defining by me&ns of suffixes, 
will soon become both easy and familiar. 

Special attention should be directed to those suffixes, which having 
very different uses, are for that reason made to appear in different 
Exercises, and under a difierent classification. Thus amt and ent, 
which in Exercise 2 are classed with ing, as having the same general 
aiffmfication, again appear in Exercise 4, alpng with that numerous list 
of terminations that mean the person who. In this matter, the teacher 
cannot be too particular. 



IIH 
»T 
IFT 
EN 



ATK 
lATB 
UATX 

CATS 

ICATX 
ITK 

]ir« 

ANT ' 
JUIT 

IKNT 



ExsaciBE 1* 

Civilize, 

Stigmatize, 

Glue, 

Criticise, 

to make; to give; to Cleanse, 

put upon or into. Stablish, 

Satisfy, 

Justify, 

Soften, 

Breathe, 

EXXBCISK 2. 

Maturate, 
Ampliate, 
Actuate, 
to make; to give; to Implicate, 
put npon or into. 

Duplicate, 
Umte, 

Watering, 
} continuing to ;i«B* ^^^ 

Sufficient, 



to make civiL 

to put a stigma upon* 

to fiiimih with, or pot k^ 

glass. 
to make criticums* 
to make dean, 
to make stable, 
to make, or do sufficient, 
to make just, 
to make soft, 
to make a breathing; to re« 

spire. 



to make ripe, or mature . 
to make ample, 
to make, or cause to act* 
to make, or put infold, i. e. 

involve. . 
to make duple, or double, 
to make one, i. e. to join to* 

getiier. 
continuing to water* 
sleepm^. 
hai^g. _ 
sufficing, i. e. enough. 



Dramatiie, to make, i. e. to put into the form of a drama. 

Pniverite, to make, i. e. to reduce to dust. 

EjHStdize, to make, i. e. to write epistles. 
* The Bu£Sx, ing, is placed above, as a definition of the terminations, ant and ent 
which are, in general, its true equivalents. To define a word ending in either of 
these suffixes, therefore, add ing to that word which expresses the sense of the rad^ 
iealpart. llie examples above well illustrate this ; dorm, the radical part of dor- 
mant, signifies, to sleep; therefore, to define dormant, add ing to tho woid, eleep, and 
you get eUeping, tho proper de&iisg term. 



ANALYTICAL HAMirAI,. 



It 









Exercise 3. 


KST 


d08t 




• Runnest, 


KTH ; 


) 




Waketh, 


» 


^does 




Wishes, 


B < 


1 




Finds, 


-/! 


did 




Preferred, 
Suflfered, 


ATE ' 






Globate, 


ITE 


made ; made of or like 


; Erudite, 


EN 


possessed of; ed.* 


Silken, 


ED 






Renowned, 
Exercise 4. 


ANT 






Servant, 


ENT 






President. 


ATE 






Collegiate, 


ITE 






Favorite, 


AST 






Encomiast, 


1ST 


onevjho; 




Botanist, 


ADO 


a person. 


Desperado, 


ARD 






Dotard, 


ON 






Glutton, 


080 






Virtuoso, 


J 






Exercise 5. 


AR 






Beggar, 


ART 






Adversary, 


lART 






Incendiary, 


ER 






Payer, 


EE 






Payee, 


EER 


><m6who; 


a person. 


Charioteer, 


IBR 






Cannonier, 


OR 






Executor, 


IVE 






Executive, 


STER 






Teamster, 
Exercise 6. 


WER 


) 




Partner, 


YER 


> one who ; 


a person. 


Lawyer, 


ZEN 


s 




Citizen, 



dost ran. 

does wake. 

does wish. 

does find. 

did prefer. 

did suffer. 

made, or formed like a globe. 

learned. 

•made of silk. 

possessed of renown. 



one who serves. 

one who Dresides. 

one who^ a member of a 

college, 
one who is favored. . 
one who n||uses, or extxAs. 
one skillecW botany, 
a person who is desperate, 
one who dotes, 
one who eats to excess, 
one skilled in the fine arts, 

or in things curious or 

antique. 



one who lives by begging. 

a person opposed, or hostue. 

one who maliciously fires or 
inflames. 

one who pays. 

one who receives pay. 

one who drives a chariot. 

one who manages a cannon. 

one who executes a will, 
i. e. its provisions. 

one having power to exe- 
cute laws. 

one who drives a team. 



one who owns, or takes part. 

one versed in law. 

one who dwells in a city. 



* Notice, that the participial termination edj like ing, often forms the best defim^ 
turn of its equivalents. This particle ahnost always conveys a pataive sense ; that 
IS, it r^resents the person or thing to which the derivative' word is applied, as being 
or having been affected by that which the radical part signifieB. Thus, odor, [scen^ 
giyas.the form odoro^e, which is best defined, scentecf. 

3 



18 



JJUItTnCAL JUXVAL. 



UAK 






AS 


'oneuho; apertm. 


Veteran, 


lAlf 




Graminarian, 


TAIN 


• 


Chieftain, 


xss ' 


/ 


- Lioness, 


IX 


Medairix, 


IKE 


afemdU. 


Heroine, 


AftO 




Virago, 
Exercise 7. 


ITT 




Publicity, 


BTT 




Variety, 


TT 


V 


Novelty, 


CI 




Priv|icy, 



cx 

ICE 
VDE 
TUDE 
ITUDE 

irsss 

T 

TH 

MONT 



ION 

KENT 

AMENT 

IMENT 

VKE 
TURE 
^TURE 

ITURE 



Opnlence, 
the quality or state of be- 
ing; WA thing which, Justice, 
or (hat tohich.* Quietude, 

Plenitude, 
Exactitude, 



Restraint, 

Truth, 

Sanctimony, 

Exercise 8. 

Erection, 

Ejectment, 

Ajmament, 

Impediment, 
(he act of; (he thing 
vMch,* or that which. Pressure, 
Mixture, 
Signature, 

Expenditure, 



one skilled in an art, or trade. 

one old in any service, spe- 
cially war. 

one skilled in grammar. 

one who is head, or leader. 

a female of the lion kind. 

a female who mediates. 

a female who is brave. 

a female with the. sterner 
qualities of a man. 



the quality or state of be- 
ing public. 

the quality of being various* 

the quality of being novel. 

the quality or state of being 
private. 

the quality or state of be- 
ing ricn. 

that which is just. 

the state of being quiet. 

the state of being ndl. 

the quality or state of be- 
ing exact. 

the quality of being meek. 

that which restrains. 

that which is true. 

the quality of being sacred. 



the act of erecting. 

the act of ejecting. 

that which is armed, i. e. 
A body of forces. 

that which impedes, or hin- 
ders. 

the act of pressing. 

that which is mixed. 

that which is signed, as 
one^s name. 

that which is expended, or 
laid out. 



• Nearly all those suffixes which denote the quality or condition of a thmg, do, 
also, frequently denote the thing itself. Thus, novelty, which expresses the quality 
indicated by the epithet novel, may, also, signify, the thing which is novel. Ip like 
manner, the suffixes which admit the defijiition, the act of, designate, also, the thing 
• which acts or ia acted upon. Affirmation is an instance ; which means, either the 
Met of B&mune, or that which is affirmed ; so improvement, which may signify, ei 
ibiathe act of imftoy'mg, or that which improves. The teacher will find it very 
VMftd to exercise tiie pupU in making this distinction. 



ANALYTICAL HAHVAL. 



19 



Ah 

ADX 



\'^.^.tA^t^ ?^ade. 



v:Mch UT that tohieh. 



the act of rcfnamg. 
the act of diacharging caa- 
mm* 



AL 

EAL 

lAL 

17AI. 

CRN 

UlUf 

lAC 

IC 
TIC 

ATIC 
ETIC 



ID 
AN 
KAN 
IAN 

IN£ 
ILE 

KTH 

TH 

AB 

ART 

lART 

UART 



OSE 

OVS 

SOUS 

IOU8 

UOUS 

CEOUS 

ACEOUS 
AlVEOnS 

oifxotni 
tnouf 



Exercise 9. 

Centrali 
Corporeal, 
Dictalprial, 
' Habitual, 
Southeni, 

pertaining, hdonging *^"^*™» 

Patriotic, 
Dyapeptie, 

Emblematic, 
Dietetic, 

Exercise 10. 

Stupid, 
Roman, 
Marmorean, 
Newtpnian, 

Ciystafine, 

pertainmg, belonging ^o^^k! 
or relating to. 

Tenth, 
Columnar, 
Missionary, 
Stipendiary, 

• Sumptuary, 

Exercise 11. 

Verbose, abounding in WOTds. 

Mountainous, abounding in mountains. 
Righteous, having the nature of right. 
Robustious, having power, or strength. 
Tempestuous, abounding in tempests. 
fall of; abounding in; Cetaceous, having the nature of a 
' having ^ nature, or whale. 

quality of, Lardaceous, having the nature of lard. 

Instantaneous, having the quality of an in* 

stant, i. e. immediate. 
Erroneous, having the nature of error. 
Cementitious, having the quality of ce* 
inent* 



pertaining to the centre* 
pertaining to the body, 
pertaining to a Dictator, 
pertaining to habit. 
belon^;ing to the South, 
pertaining, or relating to ai* 

lence. 
pertaining to a demon, 
pertaining to a patriot, 
pertaining, or relating to 

Dyspepsy. 
pertaining to an emblem, 
pertaining to diet. 



pertaimng to stupidity. 

pertaining to Rome. 

pertaining to marble. 

pertaining, or relating 
Newton. 

pertaining to crystal. 

belon^g to an infant. 

pertaining, or relating 
forty. 

pertaining, or relatmg to ten. 

pertaining to colunms. 

pertaining to a mission. 

pertaining, or relating to a 
stipend. 

pertaining, or relating to ex- 
pense. 



to 



90 



ANALYTICAL MANUAL. 



FUL 
XT 

T 



XIN 

xiiie 

VLB 

CULE 

CLE 

ICLB 

OCK 

ET 

LET 

A8TEK 



AGE* 



let 



I fiM of; abounding in ; Hopefxil, 
[ liaving the nature f or Clayey, 
I quality of. Juicy, 



Exercise 13. 

Lambkin, 
Kingling, 
Globule, 
Anamalcule, 
UUU, small, minute, Tubercle, 
dight, petty. Particle, 

HiUock, 
Feveret, 
Ringlet, 
Poetaster, 

Exercise 13. 

that may or can he ; Jit Traceable, 
or liable to ; capa- Kesponsible, 
hie of. Tractile, 

*^ nk»i»«r • Rudely, 

producing, or causing. Torporific, 

Coinage, 
ike act of, or ike state of; Pu^^age, 

> ike aUowaneefor ; 

a place where. 



U88 

'VTARD 

ZR 
XST 



Cartage, 
Anchorage, 



\ the doctrine, art or seir rw^«o 

,; ^^j. OptlC8, 

Exercise 14. 

ihatvMchis peculiar to, Hebraism, 
i. e. an idiom ; a doc- Calvinism, 
trine ; a state, or con- Savagism, 
dUion. 
without; destitute of; Cashless, 
not capable of hein^. Tameless, 
towar'ks;in ihe dxrec- Homeward, 

num. 
more. Wiser, 

most. Wisest, 



full of hope, 
abounding in clay, 
abounding in, or 
juice. 



M of 



a little lamb. 

a little, or petty king. 

a little globe or ball. 

a little, or minute animal. 

a little tumor, or swelling. 

a little, or minute portion. 

a little hill. 

a little, or slight fever. 

a little ring, or curl. 

a little, or petty poet. 



that may be traced. 

liable to answer. 

capable of being drawn out. 

in a rude manner. 

resembling a lark. 

in like manner. 

producing torpor, or numb« 



the act of coinmg. 

the state of being a pupil. 

the allowance for, or cost 

of carting, 
a place where a vessel mRy 

anchor. 

the science of visioii. 



a Hebrew idiom, 
doctrines peculiar to Calvin, 
the state, or condition of a 

savage, 
destitute of cash, 
not capable of being tamed. 

towards home. 

more wise, 
most wise. 



* This particle sometimes, also, denotes an assemblage of thmgs, considered as 
unity. Thus, foliage, the leaves of a tree, (taken collectively ;) — ^plomage, the fea> 
\ (coUeetiveiy) of a fowl 



AHALTTICAL KANTTAL. 



n 



END 
CAND 

ISH 
SOME 



[ that whidi is, or ought. Reverend, 
to he ; worihy tooe. Multiplicand, 

' somewhat ; somewhat ^^^^ 
liJce,- belonging to, ^ta^ 



worthy to be revered, 
that to be multiplied, 
somewhat new- 
belonging to Spain, 
somewhat dehghtftd. 



DOM 

BIC 

ATE 

HOOD, 

SHIP, 

AGE, 

CT, 

ar, 

ES,» 




Exercise 15. 

Popedom, 
Bisnopric, 

Captamcy, 
Chieftainry, 
mare than one ; a plu- Boxes, 
ratity of. Boys, 

Exercise 16. 

Gflnttony, 
the art, practice or 6i*- Bigotry, 
smess of ; the place Statuary, 
where^ Cookery, 

Armory, 
tending to ; having Preventive, 
power or tendency Compulsory, 
to. Amusing, 

to grow, or become. Intumesce, 
having the form of ; like. Spheroid, 



the rank or office of Pope. 
the jurisdiction of a bisnqpb 
the territoiy of an Elector, 
the state of being a child, 
the territory of a town, 
the rank ot a peer, 
the rank of captain, 
the rank of clueftain. 
more than one box. 
more than one boy. 



the practice of a glutton, 
the practice of a bigot, 
the art of making statues;* 
the art of cooking, 
a place where arms are kej^ 
tending to prevent, 
having power to compel, 
tending to amuse. • 

to become swollen ; to swell, 
having the form of a sphere. 



* These are the regular plural terminations. In this work, the form Ei is adds^ 
with some tsxceptions, however, to those noons that end in-^ 

F or FE, if [See Rule XII.] / is to ^ calf-es, calves. 



be changed into v; as, 

CH soft; as, 

sh; as, 

ss; as, 

s; as, 

o preceded by a consonant ; as, 

x; as, 

Y preceded by a consonant; as, 
t Those suffixes sometimes, also, denote a body or collection of things, or indiyid- 
nals taken together ; as, perfumery, a collection of perfumes : directory, a hody or 
hoard of directors : yeomanry, the body of yeomen. The forms ry, ary, ery and 
ory, are really compound: thus, rob, robber, robbery. In many cases, however^ 
they seem not such : thus, cook, cookery ; fool, foolery. This may be true of a few 
•ther suffixes set down in the list above, as simple. 



} life-es, lives, 
bench-es, benches, 
bush-es, bushes, 
hiss-es, hisses, 
genios-es, geniuses, 
hero-es, heroes, 
fox-es, foxes, 
duty-es, duties. 



1 

o 




J 



ft* 
o 

p 
o 



*j "I 



J 



^ 



1 



ANALTTICAL MANUAL. tt 

SECTION vn. 

EASY EXERCISES IN THE USE OF SIMPLE SUFFIXES. 

The exercises of this Section are to be written out according to the 
model on the preceding page. When the teacher gives out an exercise 
to be written, he should spend a few minutes in calling attention to each 
radical word in it, and pomt out, or cause the pupil to point out, what 
change, if apy, according to the Rules for Spelling, it will undergo 
upon receiving the suffixes to be added. Suppose, for example, tm 
Bxerciae to be No. 22. He may set out by remarking, that four of the 
radicals, hinge, hire, ice, hoe, end each with the letter e. When, it naay 
be askedj is the final e of these words to be dropped ? Before every 
suffix that begins with a vowel. Is the final e of the word ice to be 
dropped when you add the suffix y ? Yes ; because y in this situation 
is not a consonant, but a vowel.* Is the final e of the word hoe, to be 
omitted before the suffix ing?] No ; because e final preceded by o, 
is retained before this termination. In this way, proceed in relation 
to each radical in the exercise. 

At the time of recitation, the first thing is to examine the written 
exercise, and point out its defects. Then let the pupil spell oraUy 
each word, and define it by means of the suffix. To make him fa- 
miliar with the mode of defiiiing, it may be useful, in addition to the 
regular lesson, to take a number of easy radicals, and add to each tlie 
*amt strfilix, so as to impress upon his mind the uniformity of the pro- 
cess. Thus : — 

Baked, did bake. Blindly, in a manner bCnd. Greenish, somewhat greem* 
Jumped, did jump. Sweetly^ in a manner sweet Clownish, somewhat like a 

clown. 
Moved, didwoye. Kindly, tn a manner kind. Sluttish, somewhat like %. 

slut. 
Talked, did talk. Nobly, in a mojnner noble. Slavish, somewhat like a 

slave. 









Exercise 17. 








Add 


ed 


ing 


ible 


Blood 


y 


less 


ed 


Bake 


ed 


iog 


ery 


Blue 


ish 


ly 


ness 


Bald 


neas 


»y 


er 


Blush 


ed 


less 


y 


Beard 


/ ed 


less 


s 


BoU 


er 


ery 


ing 


Biiad 


«d 


ly 


ness 


Bone 


y 


le» 


ed 


Blade 


ed 


en 


est 


Bum 


er 


ed 


ing 



* The pupil must be made to underhand cJearly, whq^ tp and ywn cooaonaDts, 
ind when, vowels, 
t See note to Rale I. 



AXALTOCAt MANUAL. 









Exercise 18. 








Broil 


ed • 


ing 


er 


Bush 


BS 


y 


ed 


Brown 


ish 


er 


ness 


Bleach 


ery 


ing 


ed 


Brush 


ed 


ing 
ing 


er 


Bleat 


ed 


ing 


est 


Bud 


ed 


let 


Botch 


ed 


ing 


er 


Cage 


ed 


ing 


s 


Cloud 


y 


ed 


less 


Chain 


ed 


ing 


less 


Comb 


ed 


ing 


er 








Exercise 19. 








Clap 


ed 


ing 


er 


Cook 


ery 


ed 


ing 


aay 


ey 


ish 


ed 


Cough 


ed 


ing 


er 


Chirp 


er 


ed 


ing 


Cream 


y 


ed 


ing 


Crust 


y 


ed 


.8 


Dodge 


ed 


ing 


ery 


Croak 


ed 


ing 


er 


Doubt 


less 


ing 


er 


Dance 


ed 


ing 


er 


Drink 


able 


er 


ing 








Exercise 20. 








Deaf 


en 


ness 


ly 


Drown 


ed 


er 


ing 


Dine 


ed 


ing 


est 


Dream 


y 


less. 


er 


Dust 


y 


er 


ed 


Fan 


ed 


ing 


er 


Eat 


able 


er 


en 


Few 


ness 


er 


est 


Eye 


• let 


less 


ed 


Fire 


ed 


ing 


less 


Bbb 


ing 


ed 


s 


Flesh 


y 


ly 


less 








Exercise 21. 








Face 


less 


ing 


ed 


Fond ' 


ness 


ly 


est 


Frost 


y 


ed 


less 


Fruit 


less 


ery ^ 


ful 


Fry 


ed 


ing 


er 


Glass 


y 


like 


ze* 


Fin 


y 


ed 


less 


God 


like 


ly 


less 


Flash 


ed 


y 


es 


Gold 


en 






Fledge 


ed 


ing 


s 


Grass 


y 


less 


ze* 








Exercise 22. 








Gray 


ness 


ish 


er 


Hinge 


ed 


ing 


s 


Green 


ish 


er 


ness 


Hire 


ed 


less 


ing 


Grow 


ing 


th 


s 


Hoe 


ed 


ing 


s 


Hair 


y 


less 


s 


Hook 


ed 


s 


ing 


Hand 


y 


ing 


ed 


Hour 


ly 


s 




Ice 


y 


iilg 


ed 


Know 


ing 


able 


s 








Exercise 23. 








Itch 


ed 


y 


ing 


Leak 


eT 


y 


ing 


Ink 


ed 


y 


ing 


Land 


ing 


s 


Juice 


y 


ed 


less 


Like 


ness 


ly 


ed 


Keep 


ing 


er 


est 


Lock 


ed 


ing 


et 



* Before adding tliis suffix, drop the m which terminqite the radioaL 



▲MAXtTTIGAL UASUAL. 



Milk 


7 


ing 


ed 


Oil 


y 


ed 


er 


Mouth 


M 


\^ 


s 


Own 


er 


ed 


ing 








Exercise 24. 








Man 


ly 


ful 


ed 


Pack 


ed 


er 


et 


Nail 


er 


ery 


ed 


Paste 


ed 


ing 


er 


Neat 


er 


est 


ness 


Pave 


ment 


e? 


er 


Pay 


able 


er 


ee 


Red 


en 


ness 


er 


Pump 


ed 


ing 


er 


Rip 


ed 


ing 


er 


Prido 


ed 


ing 


less 


Rock 


ed 


ing 


er 








Exercise 25. 








Rain 


ed 


ing 


y 


Read 


er 


able 


ing 


Roast 


ed . 


ing 


er 


Scald 


ed 


insr 


er 


Root 


ed 


let 


er 


School 


ing 


e6i 


s 


Rot 


en 


ing 


ed 


Scrape 


er 


ing 


ed 


Same 


ness 






Scratch 


ed 


ing 


ingly 


Saw 


ed 


ing 


yer 


Scrub 


ed 


ing 


er 








Exercise 26. 








Seat 


ed 


ing 


s 


Sheath 


ed 


less 


y 


See 


ing 


er 


est 


Shine 


L. 


ing 


er 


Send 


ing 


er 


est 


Shoe 


ing 


ed 


Shade 


y 


inff 


ed 


Side 


wise 


ing 


ed 


Shame 


M 


le^ 


ed 


Silk 


en 


y 


s 


Sin 


less 


er 


fill 


Soft 


en 


er 


est 




» 




Exercise 27. 








Skate 


kg 


er 


ed 


Smell 


ini? 


er 


s 


Skin 


ed 


ing 


y 


Snap 


e^ 


ish 


er 


Skip 


ed 


ing 


er 


Sneeze 


ed 


ing 


8 


Slip 


er 


ed 


ing 


Snore 


er 


ed 


ing 


Snow 


y 


like 


. less 


Spill 


ed 


ing 


est 


Sob 


ed 


ing 


s 


Spit 


ing 


er 


s 








Exercise 28. 








Soot 


7 


ed 




Spite 


ful 


ing 


ed 


Span 


ed 


Me 


er 


Splash 


ed 


ing 


es 


Speak 


er 


ing 


Sprain 


ed 


ing 


s 


Sponge 


y 


ed 


er 


Strut 


ed 


ing 


er 


Star 


y 


less 


ed 


Sure 


•y 


ness 


ty 


Stare 


ed 


ing 


er 


Swear 


ing 


er 


s 








Exercise 29. 








Sting 


ing 


less 


er 


Swing 


ing 


8 


er 


Strange 


ness 


ly 


est 


Saint 


ess 


ly 


ship 


Sauce 


y 


ed 


ing 


Vouch 


ed 


ing 


er 


Tnun 


able 


er 


ing 


Vote 

4 


ed 


mg 


er 



«6 



AKALTTICAL MANTFAL. 



Use lesi 

Voioe less 
Vamp ed 



7 

ing 



ed 

s 
er 



Vow 

Waft 

Worth 



ed 
ed 



ing er 
ing VLT9 

y 



SECTION vm. 



THE COMPOUND SUFFIXES.* 

It has been shown, (Section 3), that two or more suffixes are fre- 
quently found in union with one radical, which is thus subjected to 
tne modifying influence of several particles at once. In this Section, 
the examples are all of this kind. The first and second columns con- 
tain the suffixes each in its simple form. These being combined with 
one another, according to the Rules for Spelling, give the compound 
forms presented in the third column. In the fourth column, these 
compound suffixes again appear united with suitable radicals. The 
examples thus produced, are each so explained as to exhibit the mode 
of defining ; • each definition being merely a connected statement of the 
meanings of the several parts taken together. That part of each 
definition, which belongs to the suffix, is printed in Italics, 

The questioQS and answers following will serve to give a hint as to 
the manner, in which the exercise is to be conducted in the recitation 
room. Take the first example in the present Section. What does izs 
mean ? To make. What does ed mean ? Did, What, then, is the 
meaning of the compound form, ized ? Did make. Can you define 
civilized? Did make civil. Legalized? Did make legs,]. In uni- 
ting ize and ed, what letter was dropped ? The final e of ize. Why ? 
The final e must be rejected, when the particle added begins with a 
vowel.f 



Exercise 30. 



ize ed ized Civilized, 

ize ing izing Legalizing, 

iae er iser Criticiser, 

Ish ment ishment Abolishment, 

ish able ishable Abolishable, 

ify able ifiable Justifiable, 

ify es ifies Falsifies, 



did mc^e civil. 
continuing to make legal. 
one who makes criticisms. 
the act of making void. 
ikat may he made void. 
that may be made, i. e. proved 

just. 
does make false. 



* In this Section, will be found most, though not all of the oompound suffixes in 
English. He, however, that undentands those here illufltnited, can have no diffi- 
culty whatever with the rest. 

t See Rule L It seems scarcely necessary to obseire, that so far as the applioa- 
tion of the Rules is concerned, it makes no difl^rence, whether a suffix is to be added 
to ft radical or to another snffix. 



AHALTTXCAZi UAKTIAL* 



27 



er 

est 



ate* ed 

ate icKD 

ate ive 

ate or 

ite ing 

ite er 



ifier 



en 
en 
en 
en 



ed 

ing 

s 
est 



ing ly 
ing ness 



ated 

ation 

ative 

atof 

iting 

iter 

ened 
ening 
ens 
enest 

ingly 
ingness 



Nullifier, 
Sanctifiest, 

EXEBCISB 

Meliorated, 

Arbitration, 

Memorative, 

Regulator, 

Uniting,. 

Uniter,. 

Hastened, 
Brightening^ 
Fattens, 
Sharpenest, 

ExERcnm 
Insultingly, 



ant ly antly Incessantly, 

ant ness antness Pliantness, 

«nt ly ently Providently, 

ent ness entness Ardentness, 

ant oy ancy Radiancy, 



ant ce 
ent cy 



ance 
ency 



ent ce ence 



ate cy acy 



one viho fHokes null, or vdui* 
dost make sacred, or holy. 

31. 
did make better. 
the act of making a decision. 
tending to make one remember* 
one who makes regular. 
continuing to make erne. 
a person who makes one, i. e. 

joins together. 
did make haste. 
continuing to make bright. 
does make &t 
dost make sharp. 

32. 
in a manner insultiii^.f 
the quality or state tf being 



Assurance, 
Tendency, 

Obedience, 

Exercise 
Adequacy, 



m a manner unceasing. 

£fte quality or state of being 
yielding. 

in a manner provident. 

the quality or state of being 
BLTdent, I e. hot. 

the act of radiating, i. e. shoot- 
ing forth rays. 

the act of assuring^. 

the act of tending, i. e. the 
drift or direction. 

the act of obeying. 

33. 
the state of being adequate^ 
i. e. made equal to. 



* The particle atk, like aeyo^ others of the same import, seems sometimes to add 
little or BOthinj^ to the meieaiiiig of the radical ; or, at most, serves merely as the tign 
of a verb. Thus, eradicate means simply, to root out ; where no such phrase, as, 
to make, or to give, could well be used to define the termination. In such casM^ 
therefore, when another suffix is added, the latter only of eouise is to be defiled: 
thus, eradicated, did root out ; eradicattve, tending to root out, &c. 

This remark will, also, apply to other suffixes of a different signification. 

t Here note that one of the suffixes, [ing], is assumed to be sufficil^ntly plain 
without definition. Had that part of the compound [ingly] been defined, the defini- 
tion would have been thus : in a manner continuing to insult. In what cases, the 
definition of each part of the compound suffix should be given, must of conne be left 
to the discretion of the teaclMr. S<mi0 j^fer, in every mstance, to define in both 
ways ; thus. Insultingly, in a manner inBultisg^ or in a manner ocmtinuing to insult 
6ee, also, note upon imo, page 16. 



98 



AMALTOOU. KAKUAIi. 



ate 


ness 


ateness 


lUiterateness, 


the ^uaHty or wtate of being 
unlettered. 


ed 


ness 


edness 


Guardedness, 


the quality of being guardecf. 


ed 


ly 


edly 


Designedly, 
Drumcenly, 


in a manner designed!. 


en 


iy 


enly 


in a manner drunken. 


en 


oess 


enness 


Drunkenness, 


the state of being drunken. 


ion 


al 


ional 


Devotional, 


pertaining to devotion. 


ion 


ary 


ionary 


Revolutionary, 


pertaining to a revolution. 


ion 


able 


ionable 


Objectionable, 


liable to objection. 


ion 


eer 


ioneer 


Auctioneer, 


one who sells goods at auc/ion. 








EXKRCISE 34. 


mental 


mental 


Impedimental, 


pertaining to that which im- 










pedes. 


lire 


ous 


urous 


Venturous, 


having the nature of a. venture. 


ure 


able 


urable ' 


Pleasurable, 


capable of giving pleasure. 
the office of a Dictator. 


or 


slnp 


orship 


Dictatorship, 


zen 


ship 


zenship 


Citizenship, 


the rank of a citizen. 


cm 


ous 


onous 


Gluttonous, 


having the quality of one who 










eats to excess. 


ity 


ate 


itate 


Facilitate, 


to give or afford facility. 


ity 


es 


ities 


Rarities, 


a plurality of things rare. 


ity 


008 


itons 


Felicitous, 


having the nature of felicity. 


ty 


ful 


tiful 


Beautiful, 


fiiUrfheAuty. 








Exercise 35. 


oy 


es 


cies 


Delicacies, 


more than one delicacy. 


t& 


y 


thy 


Wealthy, 


abounding in weal^. 


monyous 


monious 


Acrimonious, 


full of that which is acrid, or 










pungent. 


al 


ly 


ally 


Musically, 


in a musicaZ manner. 


al 


ity 


ality 


Fatality, 


the quality of being fatal. 


ie 


al 


ical* 


Symbolical, 


pertaining to a symbol. 


atic 


al 


atical 


Problematical, 


pertaining to, i. e. having the 
nature of, a problem. 


id 


ly 


idly 


Stupidly, 


in a manner stupid. 


H 


ness 


idness 


Lucidness, 


the quality of being lucid. 








EXEBCISE 36. 


aa 


ize 


anize 


Americanize, 


to render, or make American. 


an 


ism 


anism 


Republicanism, 


iheprinciples of& Republican. 


He 


ize 


ilize 


Fertilize, 


to make fertile. 


ile 


ity 


ilUy 


Servility, 


the quality pertaining to a 
slave. 



* Hit aimple fonns, lo and al, each mean pertaining to. The form ical, there 
ibn, » a sort of euphonic combhuition, t&piKymg no more than either of the parti 
See, in eonneetUxn with thu, Note on ATB, page 27. 



AKALTaCAJL UiJXUAL. 



39 



tr 


ke 


ariza 


Secularize, 


ar* 


ly 


arly 


Singularly, 


ar 


ity 


arity 


Familiarity, 



ose 



ity osity Verbosity, 
ly ously Humorously, 
ous ness ousness Hazardousness, 



ous 



to make secular. 

in a manner singular. 

the quality or state of being 
&imliar. 

the quality of being full rf 
words. 

in a manner partaking of hu- 
mor. 

the quality of being full of 
hazard. 









EXKRCISE 37. 


ful 


ly 


fully 


Spitefully, 


in a manner fill of spite. 


ful 


ness 


fulness 


Guilefulness, 


the quality of being full of 
guile. 


fx 


ly 


ily 


Hardily, 


in a manner hard^. 


ness 


iness 


Neighborliness, 


the quality of being Uke a 










neighbor. 


y 


er 


ier 


Needier, 


more needy. 


y 


est 


iest 


Neediest, 


most needy. 


able 


ness 


ableness 


Portableness, * 


the quality of being able to be 
carrie<J. * 










able 


ity 


ability 


Excitability, 


the quality of being liable to 
excitement. 


able 


ly 


ably 


Seasonably, 


in a manner seasona^Ze. 


ible 


ity 


ibility 


Credibility, 


the quality of being credible. 








Exercise 38. 


oid 


al 


oidal 


Spheroidal, 


pertaining to a spheroid. 


ly 


hood 


lihood 


Likelihood, 


the state of being likely, or 
probable. , 


ive 


ly^ 


ively 


Exclusively, 


in a manner tending to exclude. 


ire 


ness 


iveness 


Exclusiveness, 


the quality of being exclusive. 


ory 


ly 


orily 


Transitorily, 


in a manner tending to pass 
away, i. e. fleeting. 


cule 


ar 


cular 


Animalcular, 


I pertaining to a minute animal. 


ule 


, ous 


ulcus 


Globulous, 


\aving the nature, or form of 
a small sphere. 


ule 


ate 


ulate 


Granulate, 


to form into small grains. 


less 


ly 


lessly 


Mercilessly, 


in a manner without mercy. 


less 


ness 


lessness 


Guiltlessness, 


tJle quality y or state of being 
without guilt. 



Exercise 39. 

ish ly ishly Sluttishly, in a manner like a slut. 

ish ness ishness Heathenishness, the quality of being hesithenish. 

amne ness someness Irksomeness^ ike quality of bemg irksome. 



80 



ANALYTICAL XANVAL. 



Bome ly somely Gladsomely, 

esce ent escent ' Rancescent, 

esce ed esced Coalesced, 

esce ing escing Ck>alescing, 

ific ate ificate Certificate, 



in a manner somewhat glad. 
continuing to grow, Or bec&hie 

rancid. 
did grow together j or did he- 

come united. 
continuing to grow together. 
to make, or that which makety 

certain or sitre. 



Exercise 40. 



ifiably* Justifiably, 



ulating 

ishingness 

itedly 

ionally 

mentally 

itanism 

itously 

tnoniousness 



Acidulating, 

Astonishingness, 

Unitedly, 

Conventionally, 

Experimentally, 

Puritanism, 

Gratuitously, 

Sanctimoniousness, 



in a manner capable of being made, i. e. 

proved, just. 
continuing to make slightly acid. 
the quality of being HStxmishing. 
in' a manner united, 
in a manner pertaining to a convention. 
in a manner pertaining to experiment. 
the doctrines or principles qfei Puri&in. 
in a manner gr&tuitous. 
the quality of being full of Sanctimony, 



Exercise 41. 



ioalness 

ilizing 

ulated 

escence 

arliness 

ativeness 

ioalness 

tifulness 

ualized 



Heroicalness, 

Fertilizing, 

Granulated, 

Crudescence, 

Beggarliness, 



the quality of being heroic. 

continuing to make fertile. 

did form into smaU masses or grains. 

the state of being crudescent. 

quality of being like a person who begs. 
Concentrativeness, the quality of tending to concentrate. 
Tragicalness, the quality of being trsigicaL 

Plentifulness, the quality or state of being plentiful* 

Spiritualized, did make spirituaZ. 



* In the last two exercises of this Section, the compound suffix, in each case, con- 
fists of at least three simple ones. The compound forms only are given. Here let 
the pupil exercise himself in separatmg these compound suffixes into theur elements, 
and in explaining their import both separately ami in combination. Let him take, 
for instance, the first one above, ifiably, and analyze it thus : ur, to make, — abij^, 
that may be ; capable of heins, — ly, in a manner. Then combine each with tiie 
radical one after another, and deime after this manner : — Justify, to make, i. e. to 
prove to he, just ; Justifiable, capable of being made just ; Justifiably, in a manner 
eapable of being made just. Sometimes, it thU be sufficient to give the definition of 
m one or two oi the simple suffixes in the compound, the remainder being plain 
enough without being defined : thus, instead of defining the form Justifiably, m a 
nanner capable of being made just, we may say, — in a manner ya^fiable, or, in a 
f^Jiable manner. 



ANALXTIGAL JIANUAI. 81 

SECTION IX. 

EXERCISES IN WHICH THE RADICALS ARE SYNONYMOUS. 

If the student be familiar; as he should be, with the matters taught 
in the preceding Sections, he may now enter, with profit and pleasure, 
upon the study of what follows. His attention hereafter is to be spe- 
cially directed to the sense of the radicals ; since the radical sense, 
modified indeed by the addition of suffixes, is that which pervades all 
the derivative forms. To this end, therefore, are presented in this and 
several succeeding Sections, a series of radicals with the proper suf- 
fixes to be added, arranged in parallel columns, in such manner as 
to make them mutually explain, or define one another. 

It must be kept in mind, however, throughout, that these words are 
not here set down as exact synonymes. Their degrees of proximity 
in meaning will be found to be very various : sometimes, indeed, so 
near as to challenge the nicest discrimination, sometimes, perhaps, so 
distant as to make the propriety of the classification itself doubtful. 
The design of this, is to afford to every pupil suitable scope for the ex- 
ercise of his powers of discrimination ; and thus to impress upon the 
mind the true import of each word by carefully comparing it with, 
and distinguishing it from, others of like signification. 

It will be found highly subservient, moreover, to the general design, 
to exercise the pupil in distinguishing the parts of speech to which the 
words in the lesson, both radical and derivative, severally belong ; as 
also, in composing sentences in which, they are made to appear prop- 
erly employed. This last is an exercise of the greatest utility. It is 
capable of almost endless variation, and, when rightly conducted, not' 
only teaches the true meaning and application of individual words, but 
also, seldom, if ever, fails to excite a deep and lively interest in the aut 
of composition. 

From the following questions on the word art, which occurs in the 
first exercise of this Section, may, perhaps, be derived some further 
hints, or suggestions respecting the mode of* conducting the recitation. 
What is the first synonym of art, given in this* lesson? Trade. 
When have these two words the same signification ? When they are 
applied to a calling, or occupation. What is an Sirtist ? One skilled 
in an art. An artisan ? One skilled in an art. What difference, 
then, if any, is there in meaning, or application between these words ? 
The term artist is chiefly applied to a person skilled in any of the fine 
arts ;* as a sculptor, an architect : BXiisan is applied to one skilled in 
any of the useful or common arts ; as a carpenter, a blacksmith.' The 

* Here, as in numerous other cases, is afforded a fine opportunity for explanatory 
observations. The scholar will listen with interest, while tiie teacher in showing tlw 
trae application of these kindred terms, lays before him the distinctive character and 
cl>ject8 of the two classes of artsS to which they severally refer. 



82 



ANALYTICAL MANUAL. 



former is sometimes styled a professor ; the latter is commonly called 
a mechanic. Can you compose a sentence, in which one, or both of 
tliese words shall appear rightly used ? Many who caU themselves 
ABTisTS, scarcely deserve to he called artisans. 

Exercise 42. 



Act 


ed 


ing 


or 


ion 


Do 


ing 


er 


est 


es 


Art 


ist 


isan 


s 




Trade 


s 








Art 


ful 


fulness less 


lessly 


Guile 


fill 


fulness Jiess 


lessness 


Bind 


ing 


er 


8 


est 


Tie 


ing* 


ed 


s 


est 


Blaze 


ed 


ing 


er 


s 


Flame 


ed 


ing 


ingly 


est 










Exercise 43. 










Beast 


ly 


liness 


ish 


like 


Brute 


al 


alize 


ality 


ally 


Bask 


ed 


ing 


s 




Warm 


ed 


ing 


th 


s 


Blunt 


neas 


,ly 


er 


est 


Dull 


ness er 


est 


ed 


Bold 


ly 


ness 


er 


est 


Brave 


ly 


ness 


ery 


est 


Broad 


ly 


ness 


er 


est 


Wide 


ly 


ness 


en 


est 










Exercise 44. 










Bleak 


ly 


ness 


er 


est 


Cold 


ly 


ness 


er 


est 


Calm 


nes£ 


^y 


ed 


ing 


Still 


ness est 


ed 


ing 


Chew 


er 


ing 


ed 


s 


Champ 


ed 


ing 


er 


s 


Cease 


ed 


ing 


less 


s 


Pause 


ed 


ing 


ingly 


er 


Cramp 


ed 


ing 


s 


Spasm 


8 
















Exercise 45. 


• 








Cure 


able ative 


er 


ed 


Heal 


th 


ed 


ing 


er 


Chat 


ed 


ing 


er 


s 


Talk 


ed 


ing 


er 


s 


Charm 


ed 


ing 


er 


s 


Spell 


ing 


s 






Charm 


ed 


ing 


ingly 


ingness Please 


ed 


ing 


ingness ingly 


Charm 


fill 


less 


s 




Grace 


ful. 


less 


s 












Exercise 46. 










Creep 


ing 


ingly 


er 


est 


Crawl 


ing 


ed 


er 


est 


Chant 


ing 


ed 


s 


er 


Sing 


er 


ing 


ingly 


est 


Clinch 


ed 


ing 


er 


es 


Gripe 


ed 


ing 


s 


est 


Daub 


ed 


ing 


er 


s 


Smear 


ed 


ing 


er 


y 


Damp 


en 


ened 


er 


est 


Moist 


en 


ening 


ened 


ure 










Exercise 47. 










Dumb 


nessly 


er 


est" 


Mute 


ness 


ily 


est 


er 


Dun 


ed 


ing 


est 


s 


Urge 


ed 


ing 


ent 


ency 


Ease 


y 


ily 


iness 


iest 


Rest 


less ed 


lessness lessly 



* See Note to Rule tSL 



ANALmCAL MAIHTAX.. SI 

Err ant atic able ed Stray ed ing er s 

Earn ed ing er ful Grain ed ing er ful 

Sxsactsx 46. 

Faint ish Ij neas y Weak ness ly er est 

Faint ed ing eat s Swoon ed ing est s 

Fat ness en ened ling Plump ness ly er est 

Feel ing er ingly ings Touch ed ing ingly ily 

Fix ed ' ation ecmess edly Set ing er s e&. 

ExxaciSE 49. 

Filth ^ y iness ier iest Dirt y ily ier iest 

Ford * ed ing able s Wade ed ing er a 

Flay ed ing er s Skin ed ing er s 

Float ed age ing er Swim ing ingly er s 

Furl ed ing er s Roll ed ing er s 

£X£&CI8X 50. 

Great ness ly er est Grand ness ly ee eeship 

Growl ed ing er ingly Snarl ed ing er ingly 

Grieve ed ous ously ousness Mourn ed ful fully fuTnei 

Gaunt ly ness er est Lean ly ness er est 

Hate ful fully fulness ed Loathe eomesomelysomeness ed 

Exercise 51. 

Hard en ness y ening Firm ed ness ly est 

Harm ful less lessly iiig Hurt ful fully fulness ing 

Haste y ening iness ily Speed y ing iness ily 

Halt ed ing ingly er Limp ed ing ingly er 

Halt ed ing 8 er Stop ed ing a er 

Exercise 52. 

High ness er est ly Tall ness er est 

Joy ful ous ousness fully Bliss ful fulness fully leas 

Just ice ly ify ness Right eously fully 

Law ful fuln^sless yer Rule s ed ing er 

Lunge s Thrust ed ing er a 

Exercise 53. 

Lade ed ing en s Load ed ing er s 

Leer ed ing ingly er Squmt ed ing ingly a 

Lend ing er able s Loan ed ing est a 

Lease ed ing able er Rent ed ing able 

Limb less ed ing s Branch iness less y 

5 



34 ANALYTICAL MANUAL. 

EXXBCISS 54. 

Lire ed ing er s Dwell er ing s est 

Mix ed iog er ture Blend ed ing er s 

Might" y ily iness ier Strengthen ened less ener 

Pale ness est ed y Wan ness ly ed ish 

Patch ed ing er ery Mend ed ing er able 

Exercise 55j 

Purge ed ation atory atonal Cleanse ed ing able es 

Pelt ed ing er s Beat en er » est 

Pure ness ly ity ify Chaste ness ly er ity 

Pure ly er est ness Clear ly er est ness 

Pester ous » er ed ing Plague ful y ily ed 

Exercise 56. 

Plunge ed ing er es Dive ing er est es 

Plaint ful ive ivenessless Moan ful fully ed ing 

Quit ed er Ing able Leave ing er est es 

Quench ed able less ing Slake ed ing est es 

Raw ness ly ish est Crude ness ity ly est 

Exercise 57. 

R(^e ish ishly ishnessery Thief ish ishly ishnessery 

Rouse ed ing , er ,es Wake ed ing ful fulness 

Rinse ed ing er es Wash ed ing er es 

Rude ness ly er est Rough ness ly er est 

Room y iness ful Space ious iouslys 

Exercise 58. 

Short ly ness er est Brief ly ness er est 

Sleek ed ing ly ness Smooth ed ing ly est 

Stint ed ing er s Stunt, ed ing edness s 

Shift ed ing er ingly Change ed ing less able 

Singe ed ing es est Scorch ed ing ingly est 

Exercise 59. 

Streak ed ing y s Stripe ed ing est es 

Speck ed ing le ling Dot ed ing est s 

Shy ly ness er est Coy ly ness ish ishly 

Sane able ative ity ativeness Sound ly ness er est 

Sharp ness en ened ening Keen ness er est 

Sharp ness ly est er Shrill ness ly ed est 



Exercise 60. 



s 



Shout ed ing er s Yell ed ing est 

Sour ly ness ish est Tart ly ness ish est 
Scant ed ness y ily Scrimp ed ing est ^ 



AKALTTICiLl. KJLKtrAt. 

Sip ed ing er est Sup 
Spoil ed ii^ er ful Rob 
Spoi' ed ing er eat Mar 

EXEHCISE 61. 

Scowl ed ing ingly' er* Frown ed ing ingly er 
Stab ed ing ingly er Dirk ed ing est s 



ed 


ing 


VP 


er 


ed 


ing 


er 


ery 


ed 


ing 


«r 


est 



Size able ed ing es Bulk y iness ier iest 

e€ 

Turn ed ing er est Veer ed ing able est 



Sage ness ly er est Wise ly ling er dom' 
Tire ed ing some somely Jade ed ing est 

Exzacux 62. 



♦ 



mg 

Wo ful fully fulnesses Grief bus ously less anoe 

Word y iness less ed Verb ose osity al alize 

Weep ing ingly er est Cry ed ing er es 

Woo ed ing er ingly Court ed ing er ship 

ExxaciSE 63* 

Wend ing est s Go ing est es er 

Wink ed er ing ingly Blink ed ing ard est 

Wag 11^ ishly ishnessery Droll ish ishly er ery 

Will ed ing s Wish ed ing s 

Wrest ed ing est s Twist ed ing er est 

Exercise 64. 

Cite ed ing ation Quote ed ing ation 

Cite ed ing s Summoned ing s 

Dread ful ed ing s Awe ful* ed mg 8 

Dress ed ing y er Clothe ed ing ier est 

Dash ed ing es est Strike ing er ingly ingnesa 

Exercise 65. 

Fly ing est er es Flit ed ing y iness 

Flee ing est eth Run ing er est s 

Flirt ed ing s ation Flaunt ed ing est s 

Flush ed ing er ness Glow ed ing ingly s 

Gaud y iness ily iest Show y iness ily iest 

Exercise 66. 

Glide ed ing ingly er Flow ed ing ingly ingness 

Guard edness less ship able Watch ed ful fully fuhiess 

Guide ed ing ance able Lead ing er . est s 

Daint y ily iness ies Nice ty ly er est 

Flap ed ing er s Flop ed ing est s 

t ■■ ■ I ■ ■ i ■■ » '■ " ' " 

*UpoBtfidiiig this i^ffix, drop the finite of UMitcUcal* See Note to Roto I. 



nuumoiL iuxuaXm 



Grope ed ing er 

Home leas es ly 

Hoont ed ing ■ 

Demon ess ko riiip 

OoiBe ed ing est 



£XJB1€ISE 67. 

8 Feel ing er est s 

liness House less es ed in] 

Rise ing en s 

8 Devil ish ishnessahip s 

es Flow ed ing est s 



ExXECISi. 68. 

Proud ly er est Vain er ness ly 

Chief less tain tainry s. Head less ship ed 

Chief dom ess tainship Prince dom ess ly 

Ample itudeiate ness ify Wide ly er est 

Adorn ed ing er s Grace ed ing s 



ing 
liness 
en 
less 



Appal ed ment ing 

Berate ed ing er 

Banquet ed er ing 

Bestow al ment er 

Benign ity ant ly 



ExsaciSE 69. 

ingly Fright en ened ful fuUy 

est Scold ing ed ingly er 

est Feast fm ed ing er 

ed Give en ing er est 

antly Kind ly ness er est 



Bridle ed ing er 

Column s ar 

Caress es ed 

Certain ty ly 

Cluster ed ing 



Ctqreer ed ing s 

Clambered ing est 

Cower ing ed est 

Cripple ing ed er 

Chagrin ed Ing est 



Escort ed ing er 
Frowaidness ly 
Favor ed ite itism 
Fury ous ously es 
Facete ious iouJyly 



Giovel inff ed 
GaAki ed er 



er 
ing 



Exercise 70. 

ist Curb ed ing er 

Pillar s ed 

ing Fondle s ed 

ness Sure ly ty 

y est Bunch ed es 

Exercise 71. 

est Course ed ing 

s Climb ed er 

s Crouch ing ed 

est Maim ed ing 

s Vex ationed 

Exercise 72. 

■ Guard ed ing 

Pert ness ly 

able Aid ed er 

ousness Rage ed ing 

Gay ety ly 

Exercise 73. 

er est Crawl er ed ing 

ing itm Cull ed er ing 



est 



ing er 
tiship ness ^ 
y iness 



8 

est 

est es 
ednesser 
atious er 



lan less 

er est 

ance less 

ful ingly 

ness some 



Hcmor ed kig ftble s Glorjr ed ing ous es 

Honeot I7 er «8i tj Just ice neas ly er 
Humanelj ity ize ness Kind ly nen er eit 



EXEBCISE 74. 



Invite ed ingly ingoesser 
Infant cy lie ine ly 
Lather ed ing er s 
Leaven ed ing ous er 
Limpid ness ly 



Ask ed ing er 

Babe y yidi isii 

Foam ingly y ed 

Yeast y 

Clear er ness ly 



est 
ishly 



'£xx&ci8£ 75. 

Menace ed ing er s Threat ^en fol ^nii^ aner 

Marry age.ageableing ed Wed ed ing s 

Merry ly er ness mexA Blithe ly some ful neat 

Mischief ous ously ousnesss Harm less fill ing fhSj 

Money ed less er s Cash leii9 ier ed ing 



ExxBcns 76. 

Mete ed ing er 

Sting ing a less 

Mind ing ed tal 

Choice ly I 



Measurement able less er 

Nettle ed ing s er 

Obey ed er |Dg s 

Option al ally 

Odor amentate ous ousness Smell ed er ing s 



lesi 



EZKBCISE 77. 

Bdet ry ess ized ics Bard ic ish ism ■ 

Purchase ed ing er able Buy ing er a 

Pilot age ry ism ed Steer age er a ed 

Power ful less fully fulness Might y ily inesp less 

Priscm er ment ed ing Jail or s 



ory 



Exercise 78. 

Hold est ing er 

est Fend ing ed er 

Sad en ness ly 

Pause ed ing er 

est Prompt ness itude ly 



8 
8 

ened' 

8 

ed 



Possess ive ion or 

Parry ing ed es 
Pensive ly ness 

Respite ed ing s 

Ready ly iness er 

£xsBciSE 79. 

Real ize ity ly izer True th* ly er est 

Ransacked ing er # s Search ed ing er es 

Robust iousness Strong ly er est tbf 



« 8«e Note to Role I. 

t 0vSb<iddiBftUs8i4lz,«cf tk»idfadiiehngsdM»t; 



unuunnci& WLinum 



Rapid 


ly 


neat 


»y 


eflU 


Swift 


ly 


MHT 


er 


esl 


Ringed 


nenly 


est 




Rough 


nefli 


»ly 


er 


esl 


, 








Ezxacnx. 80. 










Shelter. 


ed 


ing 


8 




Screen 


ed 


ing 


er 


s 


Biddle 


ed 


ihg 


er 


8 


Screen 


ed 


ing 


er 


s 


Straggle 


»ing 


ed 


er 


ingly 


Stroll 


ei 


ing 


ed 


s 


SkitiBh 


ly 


nes8 






Shy 


nesc 


ily 


er 


est 


Scatter 


^ 


ing 


ingly ling 


Strew 


ed 


ing 


ment 


s 










EXEKCUE 81. 










Scampered 


ing 


a 


est 


Run 


er 


ing 


est 


s 


Sombre 


ous 


est 






Dark 


ly 


en 


ness 




Stagger 


ed 


ing 


ingly 




Reel 


^ 


ing 


est 


s 


Savage ly 


ness 


ry 


ism 


Wild 


nessly 


er 


est 


Shadow ed 


ing 


y 


8 


Shade 


ed 


ing 


y 


inesa 










SZSEOISB 82L 











Reckon ed ing er 
Survey or /cd ing 
Tally ing ed ea 
Tempest uousitousty 
Torpid ity 



s Calcule ate ated able ationr 

al View less ed ing 

est Suit ed inir aue 
Stonn 7 kissing 
Numb nesaednessed 



er 
er 
eS 

s 



Tumble ed er ing 

Tarry ed ing es 

Tardy ness ly er 

Trampleed mg er 

Tower y ed ing 



Treasurey ihg er 
Utter . anceer ed 
Ulcer ate ated ous 
Usurp er ation ed 
Value ed ator able 



Vapor CUB ousnessed 

Visafls ed 8 . > 

Valid ity ly ness 

Vigil anceancy ant 

Wagiv ed iag « 



EXBBCISE 83. 

s Fall ing en er 

est Wait ed ing er 

est Slow ly ness er 

es Tread er ing s 

s Rise ing en er 

Exercise 84. 



Hoard ed ing er 

Speak er ing est 

Sore ness ly er 

Seize able ing er 

Worth y iness less 



mg 

ed 

ing 



8 
8 

est 
esC 

8 



est 
uca 
ily 



Exercise 85. 



ish 



Mist 
Face 



{ ily iness ful 

ed ing less iaL 

Sound ness ly er est 

antly Watch ful fulness ed ing 

a Bel ed iiDg a oc 



ANALTTICAL MAHUAL. 



£xzlu;i8x 86. 

Wanton ins ize ness I7 Lewd ly new er 

Welcome ed ly ness er Greet ed ing er 

August ness Grand ly ness ity 

Awake en ened ener ening Rouse ing ed er 

Asper .ity ate ation ated Rough ness ly er 



eit 

8 

ifio 

s 



Batter ed ing s 

Avow ed edly ing 

Filter ed ing est 

Kennel ed ing est 

Member ed ship s 



Pasture able ed age 

Umpire ase ship ed 

Tamper ed ing s 

Adroit nessly er 

Argue ed ing er 



Barren ly ness er 

Bury al ing er 

Fumisk mented er 

Gormandize er izer 

llandle ed ing est 



Worship ed ing er 
Machine ery ist s 
Marvel ous ously ed 
Mercy ful less fully 
Vibrate ativeatory ed 



Rebel ion ed ing 

Sh^herdish ly ess 

Silver ed y less 

Liquid ity ness ate 

Sacred ly ness er 



Abet ed ing ment 



Exercise 87. 

y Bruise ed ing er 

able Own ed ing s 

8 Strain able ed ing 

8 Lodge ed able er 

Limb ed less s 



er 
ment 



ing 
ing 
ing 



ExxBCiSE 88. 

ing Graze er ier ed 

ing Judge ment ship ed 

est Tempt ation er ed 

est ' Dextnmsnessly 

ment* Reason ing ed er less 

* EXEBCIBE 89. 

est Sterile ity ize ized izing 

ed Inter ed ment ing 8 

ing Equip age aged ment ed 

ized Glutton ous ously ize ed 

es Manage er ing ment ed 

Exercise 90. 

ful Adore ed ing er able 

al Engine ery eer eering es 

ing Wonder ous ously ed ing 

lessly Pity ful less able ing 

ing Quiver ed ing s est 



Exercise 91. 










s Revolt 


ed 


ing 


er 


8 


s Pastor 


al 


ly 


ally* 


ship 


ing Argent 


ic 


al 


ine 


aticm 


ation Fluid, 


ity 


ness 


8 




est Holy 


ly 


nesis 


er 


est 



Exercise 92. 
or Aid ed ing ance •le 



* Upon addbg meni, drop e final of argue. 



40 



AJUJJmCAL JU3XUAU 



Jolly 11688 ly ty e8t 

Tur^d ity \y Des8 
Noiuoasly iie88 

Triumphed ant antly ing 



Merry iie88 ly er eal 

Tumid ly neas 
Noisome ly ness 
Rejoice er ingly ing ed 



Exercise 93. 



est 

y 



Array ed ing er est Order ed ly ing 

Array ed ing er 8 Dress ed ing er 

Edit ion or orial orship Publish ed ing er 

Esteem ed er ing s Honor ed ing able er 

Fathom ed ing aUe less Sound ed ing less s 

Defray ed ing s ment Pay ed ing able ment 

EZEECISE 94. 



less ed 



Arrow y s Shaft ed s 

Aster oid* oidal ism al Star like y 

Autumnal ity s Fall 

Anchor ed ^ige able ing Moor ed age ing f 

Auctioa eer ary eered eering Vendue es 



Exercise 95. 



Angel ic icalnessage like 

Abridge ed ing ment er 

Absurd ity ly ness est 

Ambush ea > ing ment es 
Argilf aceotts^ous 



Spirit ual ually aalness uality 
Shorten ed ing er s 
Foolish ness ly 
Snare ed ing er t 
Clay ey ed ish ing 



Ancer y 

Ballast ed 

Ballot ed 

Bishop ric 

Batten ed 



Betray ed 

Bevel ed 

Blazon ed 

Barrel ed 

Bottle ed 



Exercise 96. 

ier est ily Passion ate less ately ateness 

ing s Steady ed ing ness w 

ing ation s Vote ed ing er s 

like ly ed Prelate ical cy ship ist 

ing est s Fat en ei^ ness est 



Exercise 97. 

ing er ment Deceive ed ing er 

ing er ment Curve ed ing ity 

ing ry er Publish ed ing er 

ing 9 Cask ed ing s 

ing 8 Vial ed ing s 



est 



ment 



* (frMaddia|rthesidb[flB0»d,otial,uidim,<li6 « cf the ndieal it not to bt 
n^ected 
t Tlie final 2 ii to be doubled upon adding the nffizea. 



AKAJUraCAh MAJXUAL. 4^ 

Smcnx 9a> 

Better neas ing ment ed Improve ed ins ment able 

Beauty ful fy lees ousl* Grace fid fuUy less ed 

Cancel ate atkm ed ing Annul ed ing ment est 

Carlxm ic ize ous ization Charcoal 

Careen ed ing s Incline ed ing atiou' able 

Exercise 99. 

Cater ed er 

Cement ed ation atory ing 



Cycle Old oidal s 
Coquet ish ry ed 
Cridc al ally ise 



y 


Provide ed 


ing 


ent 


er 


ing 


Unite 


ed 


ing 


ive 


er 




Circle 


ed 


iiig 


et 


er 


ing 


Jilt 


ed 


S 


■ 




ism 


Judge 


ment ing 


ed 


Mf 


Exercise 100. 










ry 


Chief 


tain 


ess 


leas 


dom 


al 


Gainsay er 


s 


8 




able 


Refuse 


al 


At 


iMe 


er 


Desponded 


enoy 


ent 


fngly 


ness 


Pious 


iy 








Exercise 10;t. 










etip 


Food 


fill 


less 






er 


Send 


inir 


er 


e«t 


8 


ed 


Combat ed^ 


ing 


ant 


aUe 




Obscure ed 


i^ 


ly 


adoQ 


able 


Grudge 


ing 


ii^y 


ed 


er 


Exercise 102. 











Captain cy ship s 
Deny er est es 
Deny al ing ed 
Despair ed ingly fill 
Devout less lessnessly ness 



Diet ed ing ary 

Dispatched ing ful 

Duel ist er ing 

Eclipse ed ing s 

Envy ous eusly ed 



Essencefial ially iality iate Substancetialially iate ive 

Essence ed ing s Perfume ed ing er ^y ' 

Fellow ed ly ship s Mate ed less ing s 

Freckle ed ing s Spot ed y less ednesi 

Frizzle ed ing er Curl ed y iness ingly 

Exercise 103. 

Ferret ed ing er s Search ed ing ingly s 

Ferry ed age ing es Carry ed age ing er 

Fortune less ate ately s Luck y ily less Uy 

Fumble ed ing ingly er Grope ed ing er et 

Harvest ed ing er s Reap ed ing er s 

•^■■"■« •111 1 I II MM^I«M«HMaa^ 

* See Note to Rule IX. 

t When the fidBzM aie added, e of ttie ndicd is difAf;ed ia|^ t 



43 



ANALTTICAt. KAXUAL. 



£ZSE6I8X 104. 



Gil>bou8ly neas odty* 
Heinous ly . nes8 
Herald ed ry ship ic 
Index ical icallyes 
Invoice ed ing s 



Convex ity ed edly ly 
Odious ly ness 

Proclaimed ing ation er 

Gnomon ical ics ic 

Schedule ed ing s 



Exercise 105. 

Murder ed ous ing er Kill ed ing er s 

Musket eer s Gun er ery ing s 

Mountain eer ous et ousness Hill ock y ed ing 

Neighbor ing less ly hood Vicine ity al age 

Pirate icafcy ed ically Robber y s 



Paddle ed ing er 

Puzzle ed ingly er 

Stumble ed ing er 

License ed ing er 

Magnet ic ize ism 



Martyr dom ed ize 
Minor ationity 

Mortgage»ed ing ee 

Postu ed ing er 

Pustule ate ated ous 



Ransom ed ing er 

Rivet ed ing s 

Royal ly ist ty 

Sca£[bld ed ing age s 

Senate or orial orship s 



Exercise 106. 










8 


Row 


ed 


ing 


er 


able 


8 


Perplex 


ed 


ing 


ity 


edness 


s 


Trip 


ed 


ing 


er 




s 


Allow 


ed 


ing 


ance 


able 


ics 


Loadstonef < 


3S 




^^ 


Exercise 107. 








4>> 


ing 


Witnessed 


ing 


es 






Less 


en 


ened 


ening 




er 


Pledge 


ed 


ing 


ee 


er 


s 


Comment ed 


ing 


8 


ator 


s 


Pimple 


ed 


s 






Exercise 108. 











less Redeem ed er able ableness 

Clinch ed ing er 

ism Regal ly ity 

Stage ing s 

Council or s 



Exercise 109. 



Sermon ize izing izer s 
Suffirageator es ant 
Supple ness er est 
Signal ize izing ized s 
Varnish ed ing er es 



Discourse ed ing ive 

Vote ed ing er 
Pliant ness cy 

Beacon ed ing age 

Gloss ed ing y 



8 

inesB 



* Before affixing onty, remove the tenwnatkm ou$, from gibbouf. 
t More eofieotly, hautone* 



JMAUTKAL UAKUAL. 



48 



SECTION X. 
SYNONYMOUS RADICALS CONTINUED 



EXKECISK 111. 

Brins pi; er » Bear isg er s 

Goad ing ed 8 Prick ed ing er 

Form 8 6(1 ing Shape less ed ing 

Flow ed ing ingly Glide ed ing er 

Cleave ed ing er Split ing s er 



Class ed ing es 

Deed • 1^ 

Hear ing est er 

Jdt ed ing a 

Case ed ing s 



Lean 
Lean 
Kaise 
Band 
Soil 



ed ing 8 

nesser • est 

ed kig er 

ed ing er 

ed lew iness 



Fledge ed tng ee 

Slack en ly 

Stay ed* ing a 

Tooth less ed ing 

Skip ed ing er 



Fleet 
Fold 
Kale 
Cede 
Fog 



ness er est 
ed ing er 
ed ing er 
ed ing es 
y iness ily 



Whoop iBd ing s 
Dig ing er s 



ExEmciSK 112» 



Rank 

Act 

Hark 

Jar 

Box 



ed ing 8 

8 in^ or 

en enmged 

ed ing est 

ed ing es 



Exercise ]13» 



Bend 

Thin 

Lift 

Crew 

Stais 



ing ed er 

nesser est 

ed ing er 

s 

ed ing a 



EXEBCISE 114. 

Plight ed ing er 

Loose en ly ness 

Bide ed ing er 

Fang less ed s 

Leap ed ing er 

Exercise 115. 

Quick ness ly est 

Plait ed ing er 

Sway ed ing s 

Yield ed ing s 

Haze y ed ing 

Exercise 116, 

Shout ed ing s 
Delve ed ing 8 



Fetch ed ing es 
Spur ed ing 8 
Mode i^ ifiedifiabk 
Slaream ed ing let 
Kend ing a er 



Grade ed ing atio* 
Feat a 

List en eningener 
Shake ing; en er 
Sheath ed ing less 



Stoop ed ing ingly 

Poor nesser est 

Hoist ed ing er 

Gang a 

Dirt y yingied 



Pawn ed ing ee 

Lax ative ly ity 

Dwell ed in6 s 

Tusk ed y 8 

Jump ed ing er 



Swift nessly er 

Wrap ed ing er 

Keign ed ing er 

Grant ed ing est 

Mist y s 



Bawl ed ing er 
Grub ed ing er 



•^ 



* The radicalB Hay, lay, pay, say, mstead of receiving ed regularly, [See Knie 
XI.]» diange the final y into t, and also reject the e of the svlSz; thus, stay-fd, 
gtaidt, iaid^ paid, §aid^ 



44 



▲irililTIOAL XAMrMH 



Task ed ing 8 
Drudge ed ing ezy 
Quit ed ing in^ 



Ton ed ing est Work ed ing er 

Toil ed ing some Plod ed ing er 

Cease ed ing es Stop ed ing er 

EXEECISE 116. 

Want ing ed less Lack ing ed s Need ing ed y 

Err ed able atic Miss ed ing es Fail ed ing nre 

Bend ing let able Curve ed ing attoe Crook ed ing edly 

Bmid ing er s Lean ed ing s Stoop ed ing s 

Bend ing s er Nod ing ed er Bow ing 









EXEKCISE 117. 








Illll 


lessed 
ed me 
ed aUe 
ing ed 
M ing 


ing 

er 

less 

fill 

less 


Path less ed ing 
Squeezeed ing er 
Chide ed ing er 
Haraf inff ed less 
Dread M ing less 

EzxBcisB lie. 


Way 

Press 

Scold 

Wound 

Awe 


less 8 
ed uxe 
ed ing 
ling ed 
M ing 


ing 
er 
less 
fuhiM 


Boon 
Boon 

Shoot 
Shoot 
Shoot 


8 


er 

er 


Gift 8 

Gay ety er ly 
Tliow ing s er 
Dart ing 8 er 
Bud ing 8 let 

EZXBCISB 119. 


Grant 

Blithe 

Cast 

Fly 

Sprout 


8 

ly ness 
ing s 
ing ea 
ing 8 


some 

er 

er 



Sound ly ness est 

Sound eid ing er 

Cringe ed ing er 

Bathe ed ing est 

Odd ity ly est 



Sane ity ness ative 
Chime ea ing es 
Crouch ed ing es 
Lave ed ing est 
Droll ness lak ery 



Whole ness some somely 

Ring er ing s 

Fawn ed« ing ingly 

Wash ed ing est 

Queer nessly est 



EXXBCISE 120. 
Bland ish ishmentness Mild ly ness est 



Close ed ing s 

Close ed ing s 

Close ly er est 

Close ^ ^ est 



Shut er ing s 



Stop 
Near 



ed ing er 
ly er est 



Dense er est ity 
Exercise 121. 



Meek 
Slam 
Bung 
Snug 
Thick 



ly er est 

ed ing er 

ed ing s 

er est ness 

nesser est 



Sneak ed log ingly Skulk ed ing er Lurk ed ing s 

Scene es ery View ed ing less Sight s 

Stretch ed ing er Strain ed ing er Rack ed ing er 

Seek ing er est Search ing er est Hxmt ing er est 

Mount ed ing er ' Climb ed ing s Scale ed ing s 

'EZEBCISK 122. 

Monat ed in^er Rite en ing er Soar ed ing est 

Twid ed ing est Querl ed ing est Whiil ed ing a|t 



AKALimCAL MAMUAIm 



45 



8cieam ed mg. er Screecli ed ing 
Swine ish ismy iahness Hog iah iahly 
Bbw ing ed • Pno* ing ed 
Blow • Stroke • 



Shriek ed ing 8 

iPig like ■ iah 

Past iDg ed • 

Lick • ing ed 



Sprig • y ing 

Bite ing er est 

Jerk ed ing er 

Stamp ed ing er 

Stow ed ing er 



Skin 8 y less 

Skin ed mg er 

Term ed ing s 

Forge ed ing er 

Forge er ed ing 



Fence ed ing less 
Fend ed ing er 
Craze ed ednessy 
Cull ed ing er 
Crowd ed ing er 



Mark 8 ed ing 

Mark s ed ing 

Mark s ed ing 

Mark s ed ing 

Mark s 



Node ons ose nle 

Coarse ly ness est 

Dye ©d ing* er 

Staff es 

Staff es 



Spot 8 

Spot 8 

Spill 8 

Tend 8 

Tend s 



less y 

ed ing 
ed ency 
ed ing 



EzxBciss 123. 










^ray 
Gnaw 


b 


ed 


er 


Twig 
Knab 


b 


?i 


en 
er 


PnD 


ing 


er 


Twitch 


mg 


er 


Beat 


en 


er 


ing 


Strike 


ing 


er 


est 


Place 


ed. 


ing 


est 


Pack 


ef 


ing 


er 


£xx]u;isx 124. 










Pelt 


8 


T 




Fell 


8 






Peel 


ed 


ing 


er 


Rind 


8 


ed 


in£ 


Call 


ed 


ing 


er 


Name 


ed 


ing 


le^ 


Mint 


ed 


J 


er 


Com 


ed 


ing 


age 


Feign 


er 


ing 


Frame 


er 


ec 


ing 


Exercise 125. 










Hedge 


ed 


ing 


er 


Wall 


ed 


ing 


er 


Ward 


ed 


ins: 


er 


Guard 


ed 


less able 


Break 


able ing 


age 


Crack 


ed 


ing 


er 


Pick 


ed 


i^ig 


er 


Glean 


ed 


ing 


er 


Throng ed 


ing 


s 


Press 


ed 


ini 


es 



Exercise 126. 

Print 8 less ^tamp s ed ins; 

Trace s able ed Track s less ed 

Sign 8 ify ificant Note s edly^r^ 

Brand s ed ing Stigma s tize dzing 
Aim 8 Butt • 



Exercise 127. 



Knot ed y 

Rough ly en ness 

Tinge ed ing ent 

Stay 8 ing er 

Stick 8 

Exercise 128. 



Knob ed 
Rude ly 
Stain ed 
Prop 8 
Cnitch es 



y 

ness est 

ed mg 
ed ing 



Stain 8 
Place 8 
Shed 8 
Stretch es 
Watch es 



less ed 
ed ing 
ed ing 
ed ing 
ed ing 



Speck 8 ed le 

Site 8 ed note 

Pour 8 ed ing 

Aim s ed ing 

Gnaid s ed ing 



* This suffix is to be added to dye without change ; thus* dyeing. 



46 



JkNALTTICAX XANUAL. 



EXEBCISK 129. 



Cost 1^ linesslefls Price 

Crime ral less es Vice 

Fate ing ed al Lot 

Flag est ed ing Droop 

Frank est nessly Free 



ed ing less Charge ed able less 

ions louaLy i^ Sin fol less er 

ing ed ery J)oom ful ed age 

s ed ing ' Pine es ed ing 

est dom ly Plain est ness ly 



Gap 8 

Gap 8 

Gap 8 

Gape ed ing 

Gape ing ed 



Exercise 130. 

Breach es Chasm s 

Cleft 8 Chink 8 

Crack s Chap s 

Yawn ed inf 8 Open ed ing s 

Stare er ed ing Gaze er ed ing 



Exercise 131. 



Feather y less ed Plume osityless s 
Heap ly ed y Pile ing ed s 



Joke ingly ose* oseness Jest 
Just ly ness er Right 
Soft est ness ly Mud 



Crest 
Mass 
ingly ed er Sport 
ly ness ful Fair 
ly ness est Meek 



less ed ing 
es ed ing 
ively ed ive 
ly ness est 
est ly •*'*'' 



Exercise 132. 

s ing est Tell 
ing ed er Rest 



Speak est ing er Say 

_ Stand er ed ing Stop 

^ Thin ed ness ly Slight ly^ ness est Slim 

Loose ly ness en ' Vague est ly ness Lax 

Spite ed ful fully Ghndge ed ing ingly Pique 

Exercise 133. 

Game some somely ed Sport ive ively ed Play 

'~ ed ing less Guide ed ing es Hehn 

ing est s Turn ed ing er Veer 

ing est 8 Sound ed ing s Blow 

s y iness Air less y iness Breeze 

Exercise 134. 

Accrue ed ing s Arise ing s en Spring 

Acquit anceal ed Release mented ing Clear 

Ague ity ness Nimble nesser est Brisk 

Auen ationageism Foreign nesser Strange 

AUedge ed ing able Aver mented ing Say 



Wind 
Wind 
Wind 



est ing er 

er ing ed 

ly ness est 

ity ness ly 

ed ing ant 



fill fully ed 

ed ing s 

ed ing s 

ing er s 

es y leas 



mg 8 

ed ing er 

ness ly est 

ness ly est 

ing 8 est 



i Exercise 135. 

August ation ^ Narrow nessly er Strait en nessly 

Annoy anceed ing Molest ation ed er Vex ation atious ed 

Antique ity ness ate Ancient ly ness Old ness er est 



* Upon adding 09e and Q9ene$8, change X; of the radloal into c ; thus, jocose. 



ANALYTICAL UAJXUAL. 4ri 

Appease mentiTe ed Qiuet nde ed ism Calm noM^ ed 

Airest atkmmentizig Hbder anceling er Stop age ing ed 

EXEBCISE 136. 

AsBaiilt ing able er Attack in^ ed ^ s Strike ing er ingly 

Assuage menter ing Soften ea ing. er £ase ea ing er 

Alarm ed ist ingly Startle ed ing es Fright eneden emng 

Belieye er ingly able Credit or ed able Tr^ er ee ed 

BeDow ed ing 8 Clamor oos ously oosneaa Roar ing er ed 

EXEBCISE 137. 

Bnfiooa ery ish ism Mimic ry ed ing Wa^ iah ery isbly 

Bimgle er ingly ed Cobble er ing ed Botcn ed ing er 

Balimce ing er ed Librate ed ory ion Poise ed in^ es 

Bundle ed ing s Fardel ed ing s Pack 

Bluster ous er ing Swagger ed er ingly Boast 

ExsaciSE 138. 

Brandish ment er ed Flourish ingl;^ ed er Shake ing er s 

Banter ed me er Kally ed ing es Taunt ed ingly er 

Censure ed aWe ably Rebuke ed ing er Blame ed leM ful 

Vulgar ity ly ism Common nessly est Mean nessly est 

Vulgar ity ly ness Obscene ity nessly Low nesser est 

Exercise 139. 

Caprice ions iousneas ioasly Humor ous ist some Whim deal sically sicalneBi 

Causey s Levee s Bank s ed ing 

Carol ed ing s Warble ed er ing Sing er ing ingly 

Cemle an ous ific Azure ed ing es Blue ish nessfy 

Combine ationed ing Unite ed ing ion Join er ing ezy 

Exercise 140. 

Comfort able ably er Solace ing ious ed Cheer ful less ed 

Compass ed ing es Limit ed less arian Reach ed ing es 

Couple ed ment able Unite ed edly ing Link ed ing s 

Covet ous able ousness Desire ous ed able Wish ful fuSyer 

Cynic al alnessally Surly nesser est Cross nesser ly 

Exercise 141. 

Canon ical ist ically Statute ally ory able Law ful folly yer 

Chuckle ed ing es Giggle ed ing es Laugh ed able ingly 

Cidly ism ed ing Cozen age ed er Cheat ery ed ing 

Decent cy ly ness Proper ly ness Fit nessly est 

Demean s ^ ing Behave s ed ing Act ion ed ing 

Exercise 142. 

Despot ic icallyism Tyran* ical ess ous King domly less 

• The final o lipre, isto be dauUed beCore each of the Boffizss. 



k. 



iS AKALTXTCAL BCANUAL. 

Deedne ationed y Ordain s er ed Fate aineased ally 

Devast aticRiate ated Ravage ed ing er Waste ed ing ness 

Dwindle ed inig es Minish ed ing er Shrink ing age er 

Brksle ed iqg es Mizzle ed ing es Mist ed y iness 

Exercise 143. 

Babble er ed ing Meddle someed er Dip ed ing er 

Drabble ed ing es Dragele ed ing es Trail ed ing s 

Even nessly er Level ness ing er Flat nessly en 

Entice mentinglyer Decoy ed ing s Tempt ed ationingly 

Emblem atic ize atist Symbol ize icd ization Sign al ify ificant 

Exercise 144. 

Fancy fnl ed ing Notion al ally ality Whim sical dcally ling 

Fetter ing ed less Shackle ed ing es Gyve ed ing es 

Flippant cy ly ness Fluent cy ly ce Pert nessly est 

Foment ed s ation Stupe ed ing s Bathe ed ing s 

Foment ed ing er Abet ed ing or Aid ed anceer 

Exercise 145. 

Foi^ age ling ed Nourish mented ing Nurse ing er ery 

Fatigue ed ing es Weary ed someness Tire ed some ing 
Flourish inglyed ing Prosper ed ous ously Thrive ing inglyes 

Ferine ness er est Savage ness ly ism Wild ness ly est 

Glory ous fy ously Kenpwn ed edly less Fame ous ously less 

Exercise 146. 

GallaBt ry ly ness Valiant ly ness ce Brave ly er est 

Gosffip ed ing s Tattle ed ing er Blab ed' ing er 

Handsomely ness er Pretty ly ness er Neat nesser est 

Huddle ea ing er • Jumble ed ing ment Crowd ed ing s 

Hobble ed ing er Herple ed ing es Limp ed ing ingly 

Exercise 147. 

Humile ity iate tation Humble nesser ed Low linessly lily 

Harbor less ous ase Haven er s Port ' s 

Ignite ing ion ed Kindle ing ed er Light ing ed s 

Inveigh ed ing er Censure aWeed ing Rail ery ed er 

Jingle ed ing er Rattle ed ing er Clink ing ed s 

Exercise 148. 

Jocund ity ly ness Merry mently er Gay ety er est 

Lament ableationing Regret ed ful ing Mourn ing ed ful 

Labor less ing ious Travail ed ing s Toil someedsomenest 

Languishing ed ment Wither ed ing ednessPme ed ing es 

Legend ary ed ing Story ed ing es Tale fill ed ing 

Exercise 149. 

Languid nessly Fed)le nesser est Weak nessly er 



AXALYTIOAL XAKtrAt. 



i» 



Mfltbod k«l ist icallyMaimer ism ist s 

Margiii al ally ated Border ing ed er 

Mature ity ly er Mellow 

Maater ly ed Mp Goyem 



Mode 

Edge 

ness er est Ripe 

or ed aliile Kiue 



Exercise 150. 

Macule ate ated ation Speckle ed ing ea Spot 

Maraud inc er ed Flimder ing er ed Rob 

Narrate ed ion cnr Rehearse al ed ing Tell 

Nidor ous osity Savor y ineasless Sc^nt 

Notice 'ableed ing Regard ed ing less Heed 

Exercise 151. 

Candid ly ness Fair 

Obscure ity ly ness Dark 

Portion ed er ist Part 

Sign 

Small 



iah iahly ialmeas 
ed ing win 
nessly er 
er ed ' ing 



ed less inff 

ing er eiy 

inff er a 

fuT less ed 

ed iul less 



Open nessly 

Opaque ness ly 

Parcel ed ing 

Presage ful ment ed 

Petty ness ly est 



ed itionner 
ify ificateifiad 
nesser est 



Poignant cy ly 
Power ful less s 
Quibble ed ing er 
Question ableer less 
Quadrate ed ing s 



Token ed ing s 
Paltry ness er est 

Exercise l52. 



Acute nessly est Sharp nessly er 
Vigor ous ously ed Strength en enedeiniiig 
Cavil ing ingness ous Carp ed ing er 



?; 



^uery* ist ed ing Ask ed ing er 

ally ed ing es Square ed ing s 



Exercise 153. 



Rancor ous ously ousness Malice ions ioudy ioomess Hate 
Relent less ed ing Soften ed ing er Yield 
Revel ed ing s Carouse al ed ing Feast 
Ramble ing er ed Wander ed ing er Roam 
Riie ed ing er Pilfer ing er ed Filch 

Exercise 154. 

Rancid nessly ity Fetid nessly Rank 

S^y nessly er Simple er ness est Weak 

Salfy ed ing es Issue ed ing es Rush 

Ser^ ly ity ness Tranquil ity ness ize Calm 

Squalid ness est ly Sordid nessly Foul 

Exercise 155. 

Squandered ing er Lavish ed ly ment Waste 

Stable nessish ity Steady nessly er Firm 

Succor less ed ing Relieve able ing er Help 

Silent ce ly ness Tacit ly ness urn Still 

Shudder ed ing s Tremble ea ing er ' Quake 



ful ed ing 
ed ableness ingly 
ful er ing 
ing er ed 
ed ing ingly 



nessly le 

nesser est 

ed T3Sg es 

nesser ly 

nessly est 



fdl fullyed 
nessly est 
ful less lesaly 
ness est ed 
ed ing er 



• See Note to Rule XL 
7 



ANALYTICAL MAITUAL* 



ExKftciue 166. 

Sunder ed ing • Sever anceed al 

Strangle ed ing er Throttle ed ing e« 

Second ed aryarinessFoUow ed ing er 

Tardy ly er nesa Tedious ly neas 

Tenifer ed ing s Oflfer ed s ing 

ExKBCisx 157. 

Tunmlt oona onaly er Boatle 'ed ing er 
Tcutnre ing inglyooa Torment ing ed or 
Tympan ize izedizing Tabor et ed er 
Umbrate ation ic ed Shadow y ed ing 
Vary able ons ed Alter able ation ed 



Part 

Choke 

Aid 

Slow 

Bid 



Stir 
Rack 
Dnun 
Shade 



ed ing 

ed ing er 
ed er leai 
ly neaaeet 
ing er a 



ed ing er 

ed ing er 

ed ing er 

y ineased 



Change able ing er 



Viper 

Verdant 

Villain* 

Vacant 

Anoint 



008 ine ouly Serpent 
cy ly neaa Virent 
y ous onaly Rascal 
cy Empty , 

ment ing ed Ancle 



EXSRCIBE 158* 

ine ize ized Snake 



Ghreen 
ly ity 8 Knave 
neas ly eat Void 
ed ing es Oil 



ExE&ciS£ 159. 



Cnmberf oos some ance Retard ment ation ed Clog 

Settle ed ing ment Stablish ed ing es Fix 

Waver ing ingneaa er Totter ing ed y Reel 

Subtile ity ize ness Cunning ly ness Sly 

Squandered ing er Bangle ed ing es Waste 



y ed ing 

ish ly ness 
ish iahlyery 
able ance neaa 
ed ing y 



y incased 
ed ing atioQ 
ing ed er 
neasly est 
ed ing fill 



lUgfjie ed ing er Chafier 

Total ly it^ ness Entire 

Merit ed orious ing Desert 

Plunder ed ing er Pillage 

Shelter less ing ed Cover 



Exercise 160. 

y er ed Hawk ed hug or 

ly ness ty Whole ly ne 

less lessly fbl Duet ly fid neat 

ed ing er Spoil ^ral ed er 

cle ed ing Snield ed ing er 



Exercise 161. 

Furrow ed ing s Chamfer ed ing s Groove ed ing er 

Challenge ed ing able Defy ed ance atory Dare ed ing in^ly- 

City zen zenship es Burgh er ership Town ish less ship 

Clamor ous ouslying Noise y ily less Sound ed ing s 

Limit ed less able End less lessly ing Close ed ing ure 



\ 



Exercise 162. 

Trifle • ed ing er Fool ed ing ery Toy ed ing ish 
Dandy iim es Coxcomb ly ry s Fop ish isQyeiy 



Vptm the addition of the soffizes, the t in the final syQaUe of viDatny is to ba 
t B9t Bole Xm. I Sea NoU to Roto I. 



AKALTttCAL UAKVAU M 



Cany ed er age Lug ed ng age Bear kig er a 
Cover ed ing er Mask ed ing eiy Hide inc er a . 
Corer ed ing er Spread ing er a Coat ea ing a . 

ExjCBciss 163. 

Parade ed ing «r Pomp ons ooalya Show y Hj ineaa 
Parade ed ing ea Muster ed ing a Collect ed ing ion 
Qnahny^ish is&iesa Qaeasy inessieat Nanseoasneaa fy 

Sully ed jng ea Slur ed ing a Soil ed ing iaeia 

Soften ed ing er Soothe ed ing in^y Calm ed ing iteaa 

ExjEaciBE 164. 

An«crf y ily iest Spleen y ful less Spite ed ftd folly 
Naied nMly eat Nude ity atknest Bare nessW ed 

Poiaon ea ooa ouslv Venom ons ously ousneaaBane fol fulyiiilneip 

Stigana tixe tic tical Brand ed ing er Mark ed ing er 

Sakiae ed ationatocy Welcome ed ly neaa Greet ed ing er 

ExERcisa: 165. 

Jonmey ed ing a Circnit ed ing; ons Tour ist a 
Damage ed in^ able Scath ed fof less Harm ed leasi leaaly 

Riyal ly ship ed Strive ing er inglyVie ed ing ea 

Deaiie ad ons able Yearn ed ing s Long ed Sng in 

Dettia ing ea est Kequeat ed ing a Ask ing eat 

EXEBCISE 160. 

Ponder ed ing inglyMnse ed ing ful Think ing » a 

Battle s ed ing War s ing ed Fi^ht s ing er 

Buckler a Target ed eer s Shield ed ing a 

Cuahion ed ing et Pillow ed ing s Bolster ed ing a 

Bramble y ed Brier y s Thorn y less a 

Exercise 167. 

Tlnmder ed one er Rattle ed ing es Hoar ed ing a 

Appear ed ance ing Look ed ing s Seem ed ing XE^y 

Augur ed ooa y Tdsen ed ing s Guess ed ing ea 

Bootty ea fol folly Premium s Reward ed ing a 

Ckiiter al esa ed Abbey a Convent ual a 

Exercise 166. 

Index ea ically Token ed ing a Sign ifyifiedificatkm 

Oonntry es Nation s al aHxe State a 

Pjroivmce ial iated ialism Cantoa al ed ment Distiict ed mg a 

Q;aany ed mg es Cavern ed ova nloosPit a , 

Coa]^e ed ing ment Brace ea ' Pair ed ing a i 

■■— ,.1 ., , I ■ ■ I ■ I . ' ' i# 

• T^ttdd^Oe anffizMT to qaaImy,diop the final 3f. tSaeSidaXlXL 



jUt JMALTSlCAh IIANUAI.. 

EuncMfi 169. 

Canker ed ing onv Cancer ate ous atian Ulcer ate eras 

Warrior like ess a Soldier ly ship y Hero ical ism ine 

Bidet 8 Pony es Horse s 

Filly es Foal s Colt s 

Bludgeon a Club 8 ed Stick a 

Exx&cisi; 170. 

Diftdceoa s Baeger 8 Diik a 

IKn^e a Valley a Dale a 

Sturdy er ly ness Robust ly nessious Firm er ly nesa 

Curtail ed ing s Dock ed ing a Clip ed ing er 

Dingy er nessly Dark er ly ness Don ish er eat 

ExxBCiax 171. 

Swarthy er ness eat Tawny er est Dusky neaa er eat 

Famish ed ing mei^ Perish ed ing able Starve ed ing atxon 

Mingle ed ing er Blend ed ing s Mix ed ing ea 

Mea«;er nessly est Thin nesser est Lean nesaer eat 

Fudl a eer Musket s eer Gun a er ezy 

EXEIICISE'172. 

CoSer a *ed eringChest s ed ing Box es ed ing 

Manger a Crib a Stall a ed ing 

Title* ar arity ary Name s ed less Style s ed inff 

Title s Claim s ed ant Right a ful fuUy 

Tittle 8 Iota s Jot a 



SECTION XL 

SYNONYMOUS RADICALS CONTINUED. 

Exercise 173. 

Bound ed ing Bounce ed ing Frisk ed ing Spring ing ear 

Curl ed er Crisp ed est Crape ed ing Crimp ed er • 

Grasp ing ed Clasp ing er Seize ed ing Snatch ed ing 

Drag ed ing Draw ing er Pull ed ing Haid ed er 

Wet ed ness Soak ed ing Drench ed ing Steep ed ing 

Exercise 174. 

IMp ed ing Duck ed ing Merge ed ing Plunge ed izig 

Dike ea ed IHtch es ed Trench es ed Moat a ea 

Scum ed er Froth y inessFoam ed ing Spume ous escence 



• * Upon adding the suffizes, the letter « most be inserted before the I of the ladb' 
cal; thna, titela-ar, titular. 



ARALTTICAL XAIIUAL. 88 

Spot ed less StAin ed ing Blot ed lag Btax ed mf 

Flog ed isg Drub ing er Wliip ed er Lath ed iqg 

ExsaciSE 175. 

Melt ed 'ing Thaw ed kg Smelt ed ing Fuse ed ible 

Gibe ed in^ Jeer ed mg Fleer ed inff Scoff ed er 

GuQ ^ibihtyDape ed ing Trick eiy ea Cheat ed ing 

,Fling ing eat Cast er ing Tbiow ing er Hurl ed ing 

Big eat er Large nesseat Vaat neaaly Huge ly neaa 

ExsacisK 176. 

Budge ed ing Stir ed ing Move ed able Start ed iqg 

Snmh ed ing Break ing er Rend ing er Burst ing er 

Turf y ineaaSod ed y Clod y IneaaGlebe y oua 

Twine ed ing Twist ed est "Wind ing a Wnatbeed ing 

Low nesseat Baae ly. er Mean ly neaa Tile ify 1^ 

ExxKcisx 177. 

Mirth fal fiolIyGlee fnl someSport fid ive Fun y ieil 

Bit B Piece s Pait a Morsel a 

Bit WMt Jot I<fta 

Wil e y a Snare ed ing Trap a ed Gin a ed 

VnSi» y a Trick a ezy Craft y inesaGidle fnl leaa 

Exercise 178. 

Brim less fill Rim ed s Edge less s Verge s 

Mole a cnle Mound s ed Pile ed ing Heap a ed 

Draw er ing Brag er ed Haul s ed Tow ed age 

Am a leas End s Drift s Scope s 

Aim ed ihg Point ed ing Level ed ing Direct ed ing 

Exercise 179. 

Mash ed es Smash ed es Quash ed es Crash ed ing 

Smite er ing Strike ina er Knock in^ er Hit ing est 

Tiy al ea Test ea ing Sift ed er Pcobe ed ing 

Dance eiy ify. Dolt ish iaimy Drone ish ishlyMope ishishneaa 

CHeaTe ing er Split ing er Wedge ed i^g Rive en ing. 



Exercise 180. 

Fay ed ing Fit ed ing Fadge ing est Suit ed abla 

Wmce ed ing Shrink ing age Flinch ed ing Blench ed ing 

Cram ed ing Cby ed less Gorge ed ing Glut on onooa 

Beach ed y Coast ed er Shore less es Strand ed ing. 

Cant ed mg Toss ed er Thrust ed ing Throw ing eat 

Exercise 181. 



Neat ly est Nice e^ er Sprace newly Tiim ly 
E^i^ «d ing Braise ed ug Eieat ea lag Posad ed 



JOUUXaCAL lUVDTK* 






Fat 

Stale 

Bow 

Wage 

CiDy 



Fait 
Fast 

RiBe 
Moan 



M loffiyBng 
ed lag Bare 



iB^ • Aaee 
neiaeat Tnte 
8 R«Dk 

ed er Bet 

leaammtOlot 



cr eat Fleet 
en enedfinn 
en ing Bfonnt 
lU tiSfyMmnk 
y iiieasGiMt 



Fbone ed leaa Fbah 

Oionnd ed iiur B«st 

Sphere icaloid Orb 

Look ed eir See 

Map ed ing Sleep 



ed il Peep 
ait ed Vaunt 
ed er Thrill 

£xKBcnK 182. 

ed ing Lay 
ly neaa Flat 
8 ed Line 
ing or Stake 
ea ing Sate 

CXXRCISE 183. 



ioff er Peer 
ea hufvCtow 



ed 
ed 



ing ed Hnoe ed «r 



ing 8 Set ing s 

ly eit Dull nenett 

8 FQa 8 ad 

ed ing Lay ing a 

ed leas Pall ed ma 



Qpick er ly Swift er 

neaaer IH^ en ed Strong er eat 

ed ing Ghmb ed er Scale ed ing 

ed ing Oroan ed er Wail ed ing 

*"' - - ea ed 



Blaet 
ExxacvE 184. 



ed m 



Flare 
Found 
y et GHohe 
ing est View 
y ily Doze 

Exsmcisx 185* 



ed ing Chafe ed ing Rnb 
ing a Wrench ed ing Wrest 



Oale 



ed ing Cnare 
ed ing Build 
nle njar Ball 
ed ing £ye 
ed ing Drowse 



ed ing 
ing « 






Gall 

Wring ^ 

lUwd' 8 Boite 

Quail ecb ing Sink 

Moor vik y Marsh 



Path 
ing est Shrink 
y es Fen 

EXKRCISE 18& 



ed iqg Fret ed en 

ing est Twist ed ing 

less Gcrarse es ing 

eat Droop est a 

8 Bog y 8 



8 

ing 

y 



C^e ed less Heed ed less Reck in^ less Mind in^ fill 
Clown bitk ishly Loot ishly ishness Churl isMy ishness Boor isUy ishoasa 

Urge ent ed Press ed ing Force ed fbl Dnwet en iag 

Game some somely Sport ful leM Play fbl. fully Fun y ily || 

Beat en* ing Darul^ ed ing Pelt ed ing Baste ed ing 

'RXMMCWB 187. 

flot ed hf Plan ed iag Brew ed ing Sdbeme ed et 

(Sen ialt ship Race es IMbe es ing H(»rde es 

Jucrid nesvly Acerb ity Pungent ey ly Sharp nessly 

Assess ed nntTas ed atxonEacczse ed able Toll ed er 

Custom 8 aUeTnbnte a ary D^y ablaea impoat a 

FXSBCBK 188. 

WImuh ed ing Tarnish ed iag Sully ed fag Mar ed fog 



AlVA2.mCAL UAJXVML. 



» 



KBm i J Bvoaker • Si]]|;e y IdM Wave y hm 

Btudien tomeovs Charge s ed Weight y Load ed • 

BudMQL • ed Cargo e« Frei^ ■ ed Lading 

Ca^ram ons vloos Gro^ s Cave s ed Den • 

Exercise 189. 

Moroee ly nese Surly er ness Sullea newly Sour 

Aufltere ity 1^ Kigid ly nees Severe ly ity Stem neesert 

Crabbed ly mb Rmk ly nefis Grum Ity Gruff nessly 

Novel ty iam Recent ly cy Modem ize itm New neaieek 

Novel 8 let Romances er Fable s ed Tale • ftd 

Exercise 190. 

Border a ed Margin s al Brink s 



Babble er ing Jabber ed ing Gabble ed er Prate 

ed inff Traffick ins able Bargain ed ing Tnuf 

ary aUie Habit ud ually Practice er ing Woo 

ed ing Fondle ing ed Dally anceea Toy 



Custom 

Ci 



Exercise 191. 



Combat able ant Struggle ed ing Scuffle ed ing Fight 

Demon ess iac Devu ish ize Fiend ish s Imp 

Eager nessly Ardent cy ly Sanguine ly ness Warm 

Espy al er Descry ing ed Behold ing er See 

FlaMiy neaseat Flaccid ity ness Limber nessest Soft 



Figure atedal 
Flavur less oos 
Flatter er ing 
Glitter ed iiu; 
GromUeer ed 



fiarass ed lag 
imtNie ed ing 
leopard y ice 
l^n^ ed kg 
ing er 



Coon 
Mieer 



g^ 



Secret ly -ist 
Secret ly 
Pladd kjr 



nnrBtonis 



Exercise 193* 

Image s ry Model ed ing Fatm 

Savor y iness Relish ableed Zest 

Wheedle ed ing Cajole 'er ery Coax 

Glisten ed in^ Sparkle ed ing Shine 

Murmur ous ation Mutter ed ing Growl 

Exercise 193. 

Harry ed ing Torment or ing Tease 

Tincture ed ing Cobr ed er Tinge 

Hazard ous ed Peril ous ed Risk 

Jostle ed ing Justle • ed ing Shake 

Linger ing er Saunter er ing Lag 

Exercise 194. 

CrxBge ing ed Gloze er ed Fawn 
Niggard ish liness Sordid ly ness Mean 

CovMt ly ure Privy ty ly Hid 

Occult ed adon Cryptic al ally Dark 

Gentle nesser Quiet ude ly Mild 



Exercise 195. 
Spectre s Spirit a 



ed 


i^ 


er 


mg 


ed 




ing 


M 


ed 


er 
ing 


th 


ly 


ing 


er 


en 


ness 


ed 


hm 


ed 


ing 


ing 


ed 


ing y 


ing 


mfif 


S 


er 
ing 


ed 


mg 


ing 


er 


aid ed 


■ing 


ed , 


ly 


est 


en 


edy 


ly 


er 



Ohott ly 



A2ffALTTICiX MAMVAIm 



Baldiiekt Girdle • er Belt ed um; Zona ax* lev ad 

Ruin oos oosij Frustrate ed ion Defeat ing ed Baffle ed log 

Sober ly eet Sedate ne«ly Solemn ity ize Demure ly nam 

BeKdP Tenet • Dogma tic tioal Doctrine al tiOj 

Belief e alile Credit ed ing Faith fol lees Tnut y inr 

Exercise 196. 

Pagan ism ize Heathen ish iam Gentfle ism ish £th|iic ism al 

Jangle ed er Wrangle ing er Bicker menting Quarrel ed 

Lampoon eryer Libel ona ant Satire ist ize Sarcasms 

Hamper ed ing Hopple ed ing Trammeled ing F^ter ed 

Vanqnish able ing Conquer able ess Subdue ment ing Defeat ing 

Exercise 197. 

Civil ity ly Polite nessly Urbane ity ize Genteel ly 

Pattern ioff ed Copy ist ed Sample ed ing Model ed er 

Spirit ed Icna Courage ousously Valor ous ously Prowess ed 

Cockle ed ing Pucker ed ing Wrinkle ed ea Shrivel ed m^ 

FHTBoa age like Priest ly hcrad Chaplaincy ship Rector ahipy 



SECTION xn. 

EXERCISES IN WHICH THE RADICALS ARE OPPOSITES. 

Hitherto the endeavor has been to explain the radicals by compar- 
ing them with words of like signification. We are now to seek the 
same end, by means directly the reverse. The utility of this courae 
will immediately appear, if we reflect that not uhfrequently the surest 
and speediest way to reach the precise import of a word, is to com- 
pare it with one, that is known to convey the opposite signification ; 
and, further, that, for the purposes of vivid illustration, a thorough ac- 
quaintance with this class of words, is, perhaps, indispensable. The 
words here presented as opposites, however, are not in every case nre- 
cisely such. A most useful and instructive exercise, indeed, would be, 
to endeavor to find out those, particulars in which the contrast, in any 
given case, is not complete. 



ful fulness fully hood 
er est ish ster 
ly , ness est er 
en ened ness est 
ing est s er 











Exercise 198. 


0^ 


ed 
er 


edly 
est 


ish 


ness 


Youth 
Young 


Old 


er 


est 


en 


ness 


New 


Black 


en 


ened 


er 


est 


White 


Buy 


er 


ing 


est 


s 


Sell 



* Upon adding ar to sone» double the n ; tbns» sonnar. 



AKALYTKAJs lUNUAXc 



»f 



SzBscitx 199. 



Fresh neas ly er est Stale er est ness ly 

Fresh ness en est ened Salt ed iog ish less 

Quick en ened eneth ener Dead en ened ness ish 

Quick . ly ness er est Slow ly ness er est 

Lire . ed ing er eth Die cd ing es est 

Exx&cits 200. 

Dry nessed ing est Wet ing ness ish est 

Eaist ern ward wardlyerly West em erly ward wardly 

North emly erly ward em South era erly emiy ward 

Freeze ing est es Thaw ed ing s est • 

Friend ly linessship s . Foe hood like es 



Exvaciss 201. 

Joy ful fully ous ously Grief ous ously ing ousnest, 

LoTe ed ing able er Hate ed ing er ful 

Lag ed ing ard est Haste en ened y ily 

Br&Sik ing er est s Mend ed ing er est 

Cold ly ness er est Hot ly ness. er est 

ExxBcisx 203. 

Cool ed ing er ness Warm ed ing th ly 

Cry ed ing er s Laugh ed ing able er 

Curse ed edly ednees ing Bless ed edly edness ing 

Dark en ened ness est Light en ened less ing 

Bloom ed ing ingly est Fade ed ing ingness y 



ExERciss 203. 



False ly ity ify 
Fast ed ing est 
Fierce ness ly er 



True* ly th er est 

Feast ed ing er ful 

Mild ness ly er est 

Frown ed ing ingly est Smile ed ing ingly est 

Girl hood ish like ishly Boy hood ish isMy ishness 



ification 

s 

est 



ExsacisE 204. 



Go er ing est es 

Work ed ing er est 

Rich ly ness er est 

Praise . ed ing less er 

Rise en ing est es 



Come ing er est 

Play ed ing ful 

Poor ly ness er 

Blame ed able less 

Fall en ing est 



fuUy 

est 

lessly 

8 



• See Note to Rule I. 
8 



fe8 IHALYTIOAL KAinri&ii 

SzxBefSK 905. 

Bold nenljr tr est Coy ish ly noM est 

Slow I7 ness er est Fast er est 

Back ed ing ward wardness Front ed log a est 

Tame ed ing ' less ness Wild ness ly er est 

Right ly ed fill eous Wrong ly ed ness fill 

EtxBCKE 2(y6. 

Soft en ened ening ly Hard en eningneas est 

Socm er est Late ly er est neas 

Teaoh er ing est ableness Learn er ed ing edly 

Thick en ened ly ness Thin ed ing ly 

Rough en ly neas est Smooth ed ing ly 

ExxBcisx S07. 

P^ace leas fiilly fiilnessable War ed ing ior iorees 

Give en er est es Take en er est es 

Seek er big est s Shun ed ing er est 

Tight en ened ness est Loose en ened ly ness 

Large ly neas er est Small er eat ness ish 

ExBacnw 808. 

Coax ed ing ingly er Drive en ing er es 

Lean - ly ness er est Fat en ened nesa est 

Save ed ing er est Waste ed ing fill fiihiesa 

Gloom y iness ier iest Cheer fill ed less lesaly 

Sparse ness ly er est Dense ly ity er est 

Want less ed ing s Plenty nil fiUly oos ousnesa 

Exercise 309. 

Gain ed ing er est Lose ing er able est 

Win ing er ingly est Lose ing er able est 

Find ing er est s Lose ing er able est 

Sweet en ly neas est Sour ed ness ly est 

Sweet er ened ening ness Bitter ly ness er est 

Clean er est ly liness Dirty er est ly 

Exercise 210. 

Cheap en er ly est Dear ly ness er est 

Siak ing er est s Swim ing er s est 

Grave ly ity er est Gay ety ly er est 

^ Bind ing er est ery Loose en ening ened est 

Bond age ed mg s Free dom ly ness est 

Oiiiet ly tide ness eat Noisy ly 



MJLUflOAL SAJriMI.. 



SteiciSB 1U1. 



High 


ly 


nesB 


er 


est 


Low 


ly 


ness 


er 


-eat - 


Great 


er 


Mt 


ly 


neas 


Small 


er 


est 


nsss 


ish 


Faifc 


»y 


r^ 


, er 


est 


Fool 


nsMily 


er 


eat 


Long 


0r 


fh* 


thy* 


Short 


er 


est 


ness 


ly 


Straig 


ly 


th* 


er 


est 


Weak 


ly 


ness 


er 


est 










£zEBei8K 91d. 










Coane 


ly 


neas 


er 


est 


Fine 


er. 


est 


ly 


nesa 


Gaunt 


er 


est 


ly 


ness 


Plump 


er 


est 


ly 


neas 


Sleep 


fa* 


7 


inees 


fly 


Wake 


hg 


ful 


fiOnessfiilly 


Sharp 


iMsaer 


est 


ened 


Dull 


neaser 


est 


ed 


Sharp . 


neaser 


en 


ening 


Blunt 


nesser 


ed 


ing 










ExsBcnx 213. 










Sane 


ity 


er 


est 




Mad 


nesser 


est 


ly 


Wise 


Jy 


er 


est 


s 


Foolish 


ly 


neai 






Heel 


4 


a 






Part 


tag 


8 


ed 




Van 










Rear 


ward 






Pale 


neaser 


est 


ish 


Ruddy 


nener. 


est 












ExKEcnx 214. 










Ease 


ed 


inir 


s 


L. 


Distress 


ed 


ing 


es 


fiit 


Shame 


ed 


i4 


ful 


Honor 


ed 


ing 


able 


My 


Narrow 


»y 


nesa 


er 


est 


Wide 


er 


est 


ly 


en 


Unite 


Ml 


edl;^ 


ednessing 


Divide 


edlying 


er 


aUe 


Ck>mbine 


ed 


ation 


ing 


er 


Sever 


ed 


ing 


ance 


al 










ExxBcisx 215* 










Former 


ly 








Latter 


ly 








Ague 


8 


ieh 


ishnesaishly 


Fever 


et 


ish 


ishly 


iahneai 


Brother 


ly 


lest 




like 


Sister 


ly 


like 


hood 


8 


Idle 


newy 


eat 


er 


Busy 


ly 


ed 


ness 


est 


Single 


nea 


>y 


ed 


ing 


Double 


ed 


ness 


er 


y 










EXKRCISE 216. 










Father 


ed 


ing 


less 


liness Mother 


hoodleas 


\y 


like 


Gather 


ed 


ing 


able 


er 


Scatter 


ed 


edly 


iyig 


er 


Kindle 


ed 


1^ 

atum 


er 


es 


Smother 


ed 


ing 


a 




PubUe 


lly 


ly 


nesB 


Private 


neflsly 


oy 


oiea 


Tidy 


nessly 


er 


est 


Sloven 


ly 


liness 







' l^ reoeifliig tldii tearfnattef f sT the ladisal is e^^ 



«0 



MXALtncIL JUHUIX.. 



Ezncita 317. 

Winter s ed ing ly Summer s 

Modem iaa izsd ist ism Aacient ly nen s 

Punish ed ing ment able Reward m ing able fill 

Flatter y ingly ing er Slander ously ous ing ed 

Supine ness ity ly Agile ness ity 



Borrow ed ing er 

Cruel ty ly er 

Humble ed ing 

Bren nessly er 

Evil ly ness 



Feeble y ness er 

Follow ed ing er 

Heaven ly liiMss ward ize 

Heavy inessly er 

Lofly ly ness er 



Pleasure able ably ful 
Modest y ly 

Noble ness ly ity 

Sorrow ful ed ing 

Woman ish hood ly 



Overt ure ly 

Often er est ness Seldom 

Frugal ity ally Lavish 

Advance ed ing ment ive Retreat 

Exercise 222. 

Sacred ness ly Profane 

Awkwardness ly er est Handy 

Fertile ity ness ize izing Barren 

Lament ableed ing er Rejoice 

Pretty nessly et est Ugly 



EURCItE 218. 






s Lend . 
est Kind 
er Exalt 
est Odd 
Good 


ing er s 
ly ness er est 
ed ednessation er 
ly ness est er 
nessly liness lew 


Exs&ciss 219: 






est Strong 
8 Lead 
ize Hell 
est Light 
est Low 


ly er est 
ing er s 
ish ishly ishnessy 
en ened er est 
nessly er est 


Exercise 220. 






ist Pain 
Bold 
est Mean 
less Joy 
ishly Man 


ful fully ed 
nessly est 
ly ness er 
less lessness ful 
ly luxess ful 


less 

er 

est 

ous 

fully 


Exercise 221. 






DUsnessVice 
Covert 


ious iouslyiate 
ure less ly 


iated 



Tud7 ly 



er 



Exercise 223. 
eet Rapid 



ly ed ment nees 
ed ing er s 



ity ness 

ly ness er est' 

ly ness er est 

ed ing ingly er 

ness er est 



itj 



ANALYTICAL MANUAL. 



61 



Bottom ed ing 

Early ness er 

Empty ness ly 

Limber ness est 



less s 

est 

ed 



mg 



Top 
Late 
Full 
Stiff 



ExKRCiSE 224. 



Plenty ful oiw ously fully Scarce 

Shallow ly ness er ' est peep 

Tender ling ly ness est Tough 

Begin er ing s End 

Mdign ant ancy antly ly Benign 

ExERCiSB 225. 

Putrid ly ness ity Sound 

Augment able ation ative er Lessen 
Agree ed ing able* ableness* Differ 
Despair ful ing ed er Hope 
Mountain ous et s ousness Valley 



ed ing less 

ness ly er 

ness ly er 

ly ness er 



ly ness ity 
ly er est 
ly ness . er 
less ing ed 
ant antly ity 



ed 
ent 
ful 



ing 
ing 



er 

s 

ed 



est 
est 



est 
lessly 

ly 



est -• 

ently 
ed 



SECTION xra. 

RADICALS ALIKE OR NEARLY ALIKE IN SOUND, BUT DIFFER- 
ENT IN FORM AND MEANING. 

The object of this Section is to familiarize the mind with those dif- 
ferences in orthography and signification, by which many words, 
nearly or exactly the same in sound, are distinguished from each 
other. Here will be seen the utility of written exercises. The dis- 
tinctions to be noted, are such as address themselves to the eye, and 
not to the ear ; hence the importance of employing that organ chiefly 
in learning them. 

To impress upon the mind the differences of signi* cation between 
words of this class, the plan, already recommended, oi/composing sen- 
tencesf embracing the words defined in the lesson, is ^ far the most 
efficient. As the form of the written exercise will be ^*^ewhat dif- 
ferent from that thus far employed, — some of the' radicals being ex- 
plained by formal definitions, others by terms synonymous which are 
expanded by suffixes, — a model is given on the page following, that 
the mode of preparing the written part of the lesson, may immediately 
appear. 



* Upon adding this suffix, the final « of agrtt is not to be rejected, 
t The sentences in this Section, however, should always be m writing. 



/ 



.,4^ 



1 



1 

O 

oi 

Z 



1^ 
O 

•-3 

Q 
O 



r 



2 



J- 






^ 



% 

C 



i 




Ni 



ANALYTICAL JCAmTAL. 



ExxBCiss 226. 



Air 


less 


ed 


ing 


The fluid we breathe; to ventilate. 


Heir 


dom 


ed 


Sng 


One who inherits ; to inherit. 


Arrear 


8 


age 




That which remains unpaid. 


Arriere 








The last body of an army. 


JLvale 


M 


ing 


8 


Depress ed ing es 


^ Avail ' 


ed 


ing 


able 


Profit ed ing able 


,■• 






Exercise 22/. 


B£i 


^ 


ing 


able 


To set free on security. 


Bale 


vug 


air 


To make up in a bale or pack. 


Bait 


ed 


ing 


s 


Lure ed ing s 


Bate 


ed 


ing 


8 


Lessen ed ing s 


Bare 


]y 


ness 




Nikked ly ness 


Bear 


ing 


er 


8 


Support ing er s 


■- 






Exercise 228. 


Beach 


es 


y 




Shore s 


Beech 


es 


en 




A forest tree. 


Beat 


s 


er 


ing 


Strike s er ing 


Beet 


s 




. 


An eatable root. 


■Beau 


X* 


ish 




A man of dress. 


Bow 


s 






An instrument for shooting arrows. 








Exercise 229. 


Bight 


s 






A smaU bay ; also, one coil of a cable. 


Bite . 


8 


ing 


er 


To seize wUh the te^. 


Blight 


ed 


ing 


8 


Blast ed ing s 


Blite 








A genus of plants. 


Bloat 


ed 


ing 


8 


Swell ed ing 8 


Blote 


« ed 


ing 


8 


To dry and smoke. 








Exercise 230. 


Boar 


8 


ish 




A male swine. 


Bore 


8 


ed 


ing 


Perforate s ed ing 
Akind of earth; the body of a tree. 


Bole 


ary 






Boll 


8 


ed 


ing 


A pod or capsule ; to form a pod. 


Bowl 


8 


ed 


ing 


A wooden ball ; to roll ; a basin. 


Break 


8 


ing 


er 


To sever by force. 


Brake 


8 


y 




Fern ; a tool for dressing flax. 








Exercise 231. 


Cede 


8 


ed 


ing 


Yield 


Seed 


8 


ed 


ing 


To produce or to shed seed ; to sow. 



• By adding x, the plural Is formed; and the word is then pronounced, as if 
wattsai, htaus. 



AMAJOTJCAL MAMUAL* 



Cefl ed ing 
Seal ed iog 
Seel ed ing 



Cere ed ing 

Sear ed ing 

Seer 

Sere* 

Chagrin ed ing 

Shagreen 



Choirf 8 

Quire s 

Cite 8 ed 

Sight 8 ed 

Site 8 ed 

Climb 8 ed 

Clime s 



Coarse ness ly 

Course ing ed 

Creak s ed 

Creek s y 

Dane 8 ish 

Deign s ed 



Demean s ed 



s y 

8 ly 

ed ing 

ed ingU 



ed 



Dew 
Due 
Die 
Dye 



Fain 
Fane 
Feign 



atcd 



ation 
less 
uate 
ing 



er 

e4 

ing 



mg 



To cover or Ume the top of a room. 
To fasten wUh a seal ; on ammal. 
To close the eyes. 

ExfEcisE 232. 

To cover wiik wax. 
Bum ed ing s 

Prophet etic etical s 
Withered ness 
Vex ed ing es 

A hind cfUaiher made of ike shn of a 
fish. 

ExKEcxtE 233. 

A hand of singers. 

Twentyfour sheets of paper. 

Summon s > 

Hie sense of seeing ; a view. 

A position. 

Ascend s ed ing 

Region ' s 

Exercise 234. 

Not fine or soft ; rude ; gross. 
Career ing ed 
To make a harsh grating sound. 
A small inlets stream or hay. 
A native of Denmark. 
Condescend s ed ing 



Exercise 235. 

ing- Behave s ed ing 

Patrimony es al 

ing Moisture ; to wet with dew. 
ty Owed ; a deht or claim. 

8 Expire ed ing s 

8 Color ed ing s 

Exercise 236. 



ing 



Gladly 
Temple s 
Pretend s 



ed 



mg 



M 



Cmomofofy written se^r, 
%% The fixm eourter m nraally applied to a swift 
f Al» written iZfMora. 



t Abo written qutre. 
e See Note» page 45w 



AI(AI.TtICAI. MAHVU. 



« 



Paint 


nesE 


1 er 


est 


Feeble nem - er est 


Feint 


8 






A false show ; a mock assavjL 


Pair 


ly 


er 


est 


Handsome ly er est 


Fare 


ed 


ing 


s 


Togo; also, food; price of convey aneSn 
ExE&ciSE 237. 


Feud 


8 






Quarrel s 


Feod* 


al 


ality 


ary 


^K^' right to land on condition of seftfiu. 


Flea 


s 






An insect. 


Flee 


8 


ing 




Run s ing er 


Freeze 


ing 


s 




To congeal with cold. 


Friezef 


like 


ed 




ExE&cisE 238. 


Gag© 


8 


ed 


ing 


Pledge s ed ing 


Guage 


8 


ed 


ing 


Measure s ed ing 


Gait 


8 


ed 




Carriage ; manner of walking. 


Gate 


8 


ed 




A kind of door. 


Gibe- 


S 


ed 


ing 


Sneer s ed ing 


Gybe 


8 


ed 


ing 


To shift a loom sail. 
Exercise 239. 


Glair 


ing 


ed 


y 


The white of an egg ; to smear with the 
white of an egg. 


Glare 


ing 


ed 


ingly To shine teith dazzling UgM. 


Goa4 


8 






A piece of cloth, wedge-shaped, put in io 


" 








widen a garment. 


Grore 


y 






Clotted blood. 


Grate 


ed 


s 




A range of bars. 


Great 


er 


est 


ly 


Large er est ly 
Exercise 240. 


Grease 


y 


ier 


iest 


Softfat. 

Name of a country. 


Greece 


ian 


ism 


iise • 


Hail 


y 


ed 


ing 


Drops of frozen rain ; to pour down haiL 


Hale 


er 


est 




Healthy er est ness 


Hair 


s 


y 


iest 


A small filament issuing from the skin. 


Hare 


s 






An animal. 
Exercise 241. 


Heal 


8 


ed 


ing 


Cure s ed ing 


Heel 


S 


ed 


ing 


A part of the foot ; to heel as a shoe. 


Hear 


ing 


er 


s 


To perceive by the ear. 


Here 








In this place. 


• Generally written /MMe 


9 



M 



ANALYTICAL JUMVAL. 



Hew 


8 


er 


ing 


Cut 8 er 


ing 


Hue 


8 






Color 8 
Exercise 242. 




Hie 


ed 


ing 


8 


Hasten ed ing 


8 


High ' 


er 


ly 


ness 


Lofty er ly 


ness 


Hoard 


s 


ed 


ing 


Amass es ed 


ing 


Horde 


8 






Tribe s 




Hole 


y 


8 




A cavity, or hollow. 




Whole 


ly* 






Total ly ity 
Exercise 243. 


ness 


Knave 


s 


ery 


ish 


A dishonest person. 




Nave 


s 






The middle part of a wheel . 


; the huh. 


Knead 


8 


ed 


ing 


To work dough ; to intermh 


; by working 


Need 


S 


ed 


ing 


Want s ed 


ing 


Kneel 


S 


ed 


ing 


TofaU or rest on the knee. 




Neal 


8 


ed 


ing 


To temper by heat. 
Exercise 244. 




Knight 
Night 


8 


ly 


ed 


A title of honor ; to create < 


a knieJu. 


8 


ly 


ed 


The time of darkness ; darkness. 


Know 


S 


ing 


able 


Understand s ing 


able 


No 


wise 




Not any ; a word of denial 




Leach 


es 


ed 


ing 


To wash, as ashes, by percolation. 


Leech 


es 


• 




A bloodsucker. 
Exercise 245. 




Leaf 


age 


less 


let 


Fart of a plant. 




Lief 








Willingly. 




Leak 


s 


ed 


age 


To let any fluid in or out; i 


to ooze. 


Leek 


s 






A sort of onion. 




Lean 


er 


est 


ness 


Gaunt er est 




Lien 








A legal claim. 
Exercise 246. 




Leave 


8 


ing 




Quit^ s ing 


ed 


Lieve 








Willingly 




Lie 


8 


ar 


ed 


An untruth ; to tell a lie ; 


to rest. 


Lye 








Water drained through ashes. 


Liar 


8 






One who lies. 




Lyre 


8 


ic 


ical 


A musical instrument. 





* Upon adding this suffix, e final of whole is to be omitted. 









.UIALTXICAL HAlIOAk 


H 










ExERCiss 247. 




txMin 


s 


ed 


ing 


Lend s er 


ing 


Lone 


ly 


liness 


some 


Solitary ly ness 




Mail 


S 


ed 


log 


A bag for letters ; to arm defensivelp. 


Male 


S 






A he animal. 


, 


Main 


ly 






Chief ly , 




Maine 








The name of a State. 




Mane 


8 






Hair on the neck ofheastt. 
Exercise 24& 




Maize 








Indian com. 




Maze 


8 


y 




Labyrinth s ian 




Mead 


8 






A beverage ; aUoy a meacUm 


1. 


Mede 
Meed 


8 
S 


inn 




A native of Media. 
Reward s 




Mean 


ness 


er 


est 


Base ness er 


est 


Mesne 








Middle; intervening. 




Mien 








Maamer ; air ; look. 
Exercise 249. 




Meat 


8 






Fleshforfood, 


' 


Meet 


8 


ing 




To come together ; to join. 




Mete 


8 


ing 


ed 


Measure s ing 


ed 


Mewl 


8 


ed 


ing 


Cry es ed 


ing 


Mule 


8 


ish 




An animal. 




Might 


y 


ily 


iness 


I Power ful fully 


fuhiess 


Mite 


y 


8 




An insect ; anything very minute. 










Exercise 250. 




Moat 


8 


ed 


ing 


A deep ditch round a castle 


; to trend 


Mote 


8 






A fine particle. 




Oar 


8 


y 


ed 


An instrument for rowing ; 


to row. 


Ore 


8 






Metal in its fossil stale. 




Pail 


8 


ful 




A wooden 'vessel. 




Pale 


8 


ed 


ing 


Wan ; to make pale. 
Exercise 251, 




Pain 


8 


leas 


ed 


Distress es 


ed 


Pane 


•s 


leas 




A square of glass. 




Pair 


8 


ed 


ing 


Couple ; to join in fairs. 




Pare 


S 


ed 


ing 


Trim s ed 


ing 


Pear 








A kind offruiL 




Peace 


le88 


ful 


fully 


Rest less ful 


fhlly 


Piece 


less 


ed 


ing 


Part ; aiso^ to patch. 





MMALTaCAL MMIXVAU 



Peak s 

Pique s 

Peal s 

Peel . s 

Peer » 

Pier 8 



Plain er 

Plane er 

Plait s 

Plate s 

Pole 8 

P6U 8 



Pore 8 

Pour 8 

Port 8 

Porte 8 

Pray 8 

Prey a 



Quean 8 

Queen s 

Rain 8 

Reign 8 

Rein a 

Raze 8 



Read 8 

Reed s 

Reek a 

Wreak a 

Rhyme ;8 

Rime a 



Right ly 
Rite g 
Wright 8 



ish 
ed 
ed 
ed 
age 



est 
ed 
ed 
ed 
ed 
ed 



ous 

ed 

able 

ed 
ed 



like 

ed 

ed 

ed 

ed 

ed 



er 

la 

ed 
ed 
ed 



ing 

ing 
ess 



ing 
ing 
ing 

mg 



mty 

ing 
age 

ing 
ing 



MxtumtK d5d. 

The top of a hill ; a poifii. 

Offend s ed ing 

To send forth a had sound. 

To strip off the skin or hark. 

An equal; a nobleman. 

The support of an arch, 

ExKRciSE 253. 

Smooth ; also, distinct, 

A level ; a tool in joining ; to plane* 

Fold s ed\ ing 

To overlay with metal, 

A long stick, or rod ; tofwrnish with pok^ 

The head ; to register, 

ExsaeiSE 254. 

A passage for perspiration ; a small opening 

To issue or cause to issue in a stream. 

To carry; aTiarhor, 

The Turkish Court. 

Implore s ed ing 



mg 

en 

ing 

ing 

ing 

ing 



Plunder 



Exercise 255^ 

A worthless wotnan* 
A female sovereign. 

ing Shower « 

ing Rule 

ing Curb 

ing Lift 

ing Subrert 



ed 



8 ed 

8 ed 

8 ed 

8 ed 

8 ed 



mg 



mg 
ing 
ing 
ing 
ing 



er 



mg 



ExsRcisx 256. 

Peruse a 

An aquatic plant. 

Smoke 8 ed ii^ 

To take vengeance ; to revenge. 

To accord in sound ; to make rhymes. 

Hoarfrost ; to congeal into hoarfrost* 



ual 



Exercise 257. 
Just ly 



ice 
ually Ceremony es al 

An artyicer, or workman.. 



ally 



AHALTTICAl lUMVUb. ti 

Write M iog ef Tof&rm leUers uriih a pen sr graver. 
> Roam er ed ing Ranibla er ed ing ^ 

Rome an ish aoize The name of « city. * 

ExERcisx 268. 

Roe 8 ThefenMleef the hart; the spawn of fohe$. 

Row s ed er To propel bff ffars ; aleo, a rank. 

Rye A kind ^ grain. 

Wry nesa Twisted; crooked. 

Sail 8 ed ing A she^ of canvas ; p} move by mZf • 

Sale 8 ableableness The act of selling. 

ExERciss ^59^ 

Satire s icid {(My A poem in which vice and foUy are censured. 

Satyr s A silvan deity. 

Sea 9 Ocean a 

See 8 log er Behold s ing er 

Scene s ery ic View a 

Seine a er A fishing neL 

ExEBCiss 260» 

S^m 8 ed ing The joining of two edges ; to join hy sewing. 

Seem a ed ing Appear a ed ing 

Seignior a age ized Lord s ship ed 

Senidr a ity Elder a . ship 

Sew er ed ing To join with a needle and thread. 

Sow or ed ing Disseminate er ed ing 

ExEmcisx 261. 

Soar a ed ing Mount s ed ing 

Sore a ly ness An ulcer ; tender to the touch. 

Shear a ed ing dtp s ed ing 

Sheer ly er est Pure ly er eat f 

Sign 8 Token a » 

Sine 8 A geometrical Une. 



a 


ed 


a 


ly 


a 


ed 


ly 


er 


8 




8 




a 




8 


'm 


8 


ing 


8 


ing 


a 


y 


s 


ed 



ExE&ciSE 262. 

Slaie a A weaver^s reed. 

Slay 8 ing er Kill a ing er 

Sleigh 8 ing ed Sled a ing 

Sley 8 ing ed To paA and arrange threads. 

Sleight a y ful Artifice ; an artftu trick. 

•Slight s ed ing Neglect a ed Ing 

Exercise 36^. 

Sloe 8 A small wild phtm. 

Slow ly neas eat Notfaa; ML 



fO 



MMAktnCAJL UAXVAi^. 



Sole B ed 

Soul 8 ed 

Stair 8* 

Stare 8 ed 



Stake 8 ed 

Steak 8 

Steal 8 ing 

Steel 8 mg 

Stile 8 

Style 8 ish 



T%c hoUom 4flhefoot or of a sh$e. 
lese The immortal spirit of num. 

Step 8 

ing Graze 8 ed ing 



ing 

th 
ed 

ed 



ExEBCias 264. 



ed 



ing 



Wager s 

A slice (jfmeat. 

To take by (heft. 

Iron hardened ; to point or edgetoith steeL 

Steps for passing an inclosure. 

Manner ; mode ; to call. 



Straight er en 

Strait . 8 en 
Suite 8 

Sweet est en 
Tail 8 

Tale s ful 



Taper s 

Tapir 8 

Tare a 

Tear s 

Team s 

Teem s 



fei- 



Tire 

Tyre 

Toe 

T6w 

Ton 

1V>ie 



ed 

ed 

ed 

ster 

ful 



Tear 8 less 

Tier s , 

Throe s 

TTirow 8 ing 

Thyme y 

Time ist ly 



ened 
ened 

ish 



mg 

ing 
ing 



ful 



ed 



ed ing s 



8 






8 


ing 




8 


ed 


ing 


8 


ed 


ing 



Exercise 265. 

Direct ; to make straight, 

A narrow passage ; distnss. 

Retinue s * 

Agreeable to the taste. 

End 8 

Story es 

I. 
Exercise 266. 

A smaU wax cdmdU ; to make smaller.. 

An ammai. 

Allowance ; tofni ti^ amtmnl of the tare.' 

Rend s ed ing 

Horses or oxen yoked together. 

To hnng forth ; to heJvlL 

Exercise 267. 

Water from the eyes. 

Row s 

Agony es 

Hurl 8 ing ed 

A plant. 

The measure of duration ; season. 



Exercise 268. 



ed 



Fatigue ed ing 

The name of an ancient city. 

One of the extremities of the foot. 

Draw s ing 

A tax or rate ; to pay toll. 

Allure 8 ed ing 



ANALTTICiX XANXTAL. 



n 











£X£RCI8E S69. 




Vain 


er 


ly 


est 


Empty ; prtmd. 




Vane 


8 






A weathercock. 




Vein 


s 


y 


ed 


A hlood-vesseL 




Vale 


s 






A valley. 




Veil 


s • 


ed 


ing 


Cover 8 ed 


ing 


Vial 


s 


ed 


ing 


Bottle 8 ed 


ing 


Viol 


8 


ist 




A stringed musical instrument, 
ExERcrsE 270. 




WaU 


8 


ed 


ing 


Lament s ed 


ing 


Wale 


s 


ed 


ing 


Ridge ; to mark mth stripes. 




Wain 


8 






Carriage s 




Wane 


8 


ed 


ing 


ibecrease s ed 


ing 


Waist 


8 






The middle part of the body. 




Waste 


8 


ed 


ing 


Squander s ed 
Exercise 271. 


ing 


Wait 


8 


ed 


ing 


Tarry es ed 


ing 


Weight 


8 


y 


iness 


Quantity ascertained hy the balance. 


Waive 


B 


ed 


ing 


To relinquish ; to put off . 




Wave 


8 


ed 


ing^ 


Billow ; to move Wee a wave. 




Wear 


8 


ed 


ing 


To impair, waste, or consume. 




Ware 


8 






Commodity es 
Exercise 272. 




Way 


8 


less 




Path 8 less 




Weigh 


8 


ed 


ing 


Balance s ed 


ing 


Weak 


ly 


ness 


est 


Feehle ly* ness 


est 


Week 


ly 


8 




Seven days. 




Wean 


8 


ing 




To put off; to alienate. 




Ween 


8 


ing 




Think s ing 
Exercise 273. 




Wheal 


8 






Pustule 8 




Wheel 


8 


ed 


ing 


A circular frame or body ; to turn romd* 


Hart 


8 






A stag or male deer. 




Heart 


8 


ed 


less 


The vital part. 




Mareschal £ 


\ 




A commander in chief. 




Marshal s 


ed 


ing 


The chief officer in arms ; also, to arrange. 


Martial 


isni 


i ist 




Pertaining to war. 
Exercise 274. 




Altar 


8 


ist 


age 


A place for sacrificial offerings 


r. 


Alter 


8 


ed 


able 


Change s ed 


able . 



* Upon adcBsg tiib iRiflbt, drop le of the radicaL 



19 



ASALYTICAL JUSUAU 



Anger 








A loring tooL 


Augur 
Ball 




7 


ate 


One who predicts hy omens f 








A round body a dancing entertaament. 


Bawl 




ed 


Tf)g 


To cry, or shout aloud. 
ExKKCiSE 275. 


Calk 




er 


ed 


To stop the seams or leaks of a ship. 


Cauk 


7 






A kind of spar. 


Cork 




7 


ed 


A tree ; also, the hark cf the tree ; to siap^ 


Call 




ed 


ing 


To name ; summon. 


Caul 








A membrane. 


Chord 




ed 


ing 


String of a musical instrument ; to strung^ 


Cord 




ed 


ing 


A small rope ; to bind wiih ropes. 
Exercise 276. 


Faun 








A rural ddiy. 


Fawn 




ed 


ing 


A young deer ; to flatter. 


Gall 


y 


.ed 


ing 


The bile ; to fret ; to chafe. 


Gaul 


ish 






^ name of ancient France.' 


Hall 








A court ; a large room. 


Haul 




ed 


ing 


Drag 8 ed ing 
ExEBGisx 277. 


Pall 








A dock ; a covering for the deai^ 


Paul 








A maiCs name. 


Pawl 








A short bar. 


Talok* 


7 


oua 




A species of earth. 


Talk 




ed 


ative 


FamiUar converse ; to converse. 


Wall 




ed 


ing 


To inclose wiih a wall. 


Waul 




ed 


ing 


To howl, or cry as a cat. 
Exercise 278. 


Anchor 




age 


ed 


An iron instrument to hold a ship. 


Anker 








A liquid measure. 


Anger 




ed 


ing 


Besentment; to provoke. 


Angor 








Intense pain. 


Ascent 








The act of mounting; an eminence. 


Assent 




ed 


ing 


Agree a ed ing 
Exercise 279. 


Bell 








A hollow vessel of metal for making sounds, 


Belle 








A gay young lady. 


Beny 


es 






A small fruit. 


Bury 


es 


ed 


ing 


Inter 



* Also written tak sad (stt. 



▲KALTTICAL UAJXVAh* 



78 



Berth 
Birth 



Burrow 

Borough 

Cannon 

Canon 

Canvas 

Canvass 



Cast 

Caste 

Cell 

Sell 

Cense 

Sense 



ed ing 



ical 



es ed 



ar* 

er 

er 



ler 

ist 

ing 



A sleeping place in a ship or hoot. 
The act rf coming into Itfe. 

EXKRCISE 280. 

To make holes in the ground^ as do rdblniu 

A corporate Unon. 

A great gun. 

A rule, or law. 

Coarse hempen or flaxen cloth. 

To sift J to examine ; to seek. 



Exercise 281. 



ing 



ing er Throw s 

Tribe, or race. 
arage A small apartment or caoUy. 

To dispose of for money. 
ed Perfume ; alsoj a public tax. 
ible itive Feeling; perception; reason. 



er 



Cent s 

Scent 8 ed ful 

Cession s 

Session s 

Chough s 

Chui? 8 



ExsBciSE 282. 

A hundred ; a copper-coin. 

Odor s ate 

The act of yielding. 

The act of sitting. 

A sea-bird. 

A coarse rude cloum. 



ous 



Cingle B 

Single lyf ness ed 
Concent ful ual 
Consent s ed ing 
Coquet 8 ed ing 
Coquette^ s 



Cousin 8 

Cozen s ed ing 

Cygnet s 

Signet 8 

Dam s ed ing 

Damn s ed ing 



Exercise 283. 

Girth 8 

Separate ly ness ed 

Harmony ous 

Agree s ed ing 

Jilt s ed ing 

A girl who gives false hopes to a hoer. 

Exercise 284. 

A child ofone^s aunt or uncle* 

Cheat s ed ing 

A young sunin. 

Seal s 

A bank, or waZl to obstruct a stream ; to 

Condemn s ed ing 



* The form cellar is used to signify a room, or place under a building for stonMk 
t Di«p U €imn$le, upon addii^ this suffix. X iS«l^«Q^«ct. 

10 



74 



ANALimCAL XAHTTAJL. 



Drachm* s 

Dram s 

Draft 8 

Draught a 

Felloef s 

Fellow 8 



Galley a 
Gaily 68 
Gest 8 , 



Hip 
Hyp 



Jam 8 

Jamb 8 

Joustj: 8 

Just ly 

Kill 8 

Kiln 8 



Knab 

Nab 

Knag 

Nag 

Knap 

Nap 



Knit 8 

Nit s 

Lessen s 

Lesson a 

Levee a 

Levy es 

Limb 8- 

Lima s 

Mantel 8 

Mantle 8 



ed 



ed 
ed 

ed 



EXKRCISE 285. 

A small weight ; an ancient coin, 

A drink of ardent spirits. 
ed ing Sketch ; also^ a bUl drawn for money. 
ed ing The act of drawing, or ofdrinhiihg ; to draw. 

This rim of a wheel. 
ship (Companion 8 ship 

Exercise 286. 

A hw, fiaUhuiU vessel. 

A printer^ sfram^y or case. 

Deed s 

Joke 8 

ed ing The haunch ; to sprain the hip. 
ed ing Depression (f spirits j to deject. 

Exercise 287. 

ed ing A conserve of fruits ; to wedge in. 

ed ing The side-piece of a fire place ; a supporter 

ed ing Tilt s ^ ed ing 

ness Right ly ness 

ed ing To take away life. 

A stove ^ or furnace for drying or burning. 

Exercise 288. 

ed ing Gnaw s ed ing 

ed ing Seize s . ed ing 

y A knot in wood ; the shoot of a deer*s horn. 

A STnall horse. 
ed ing To Ute ; to snap ; a protuherance. 
ed ing il short sleep; the daum on chth. 

Exercise 289. 

ed ing To weave, or unite with needles. 
y ily The egg of a small insect. 
ed ing Diminish s ed ing 

ed ing Task; to teach. 

A morning a^semhly of visitors; a causey. 
ing To raise, or collect men or money. 

Exercise 290. 

less A member or branch; a border. 
er Paint s ed er 

A chimney 'piece. 
ing A kind of cloak; to cover, or spread. 



• Mm^irmn. 



t Mm^fiUf, 



t Ah9,JU9t 



ANM.TnC4L lUlfirM.. 



n 



Metal* 

MetUe 



Panel 

Pannel 

Pencil 

Pensile 

Plum 

Plumb 



Rabbet 

Rabbit 

Rap 

Wrap 

Reck 

Wreck 



Rest 

Wrest 

Retch 

Wretch 

Ring 

Wring 



Rough 

Ruff 

Serf 

Surf 

Sun 

Son 



Subtle 

Suttle 

Tong 

Tongue 

Travail 

Travel 



Verge 
Virgef 



ic kt 
some 



s 
s 
s ed 



ed 



ed 

ed 
ed 
ed 
ed 



s ed 

8 ed 

es ed 

es ed 

s • ing 

s ing 



nesser 



ed 
ed 



ise 

ed 



mg 



mg 



mg 

er 
er 
less 
ful 



mg 

ing 

ing 

edly 

er 

er 



ly ness est 

s 

s 

s 

s y 

s 



less 



A mineral subsUmn. 
Spirit; courage. 

ExEBcisi: 291. 

A thin hoard set in a frame; ajury^roUi 

A land of rustic saddle. 

An instrument for drawing or writing. 

Hanging; pendent. 

A kind of fruit; the sum of £100,000. 

To adjust by a lead and line ; perpendicular. 

Exercise 292. 

To joint hy lapping the edges of a hoard. 

A small ammal. 

Ejdock s ed er 

Fold s ed er 

Heed s ed less 

To destroy hy dashing on rocks or shoaUm 

ExEKCisE 293. 

Repose ; the remainder .^ 

To twist hy force ; to pervert. 

To make an effort to vomit, 

A miserable or worthless person. 

To sound; a circle; toft with rings. 

Twist s ing 

Exercise 294. 

Not smooth; harsh. 

A plaited article of dress^for the neck. 

A servant, or slave in husbandry. 

The swell <fthe sea that breaks on shore. 

The orb giving Ught and heat to the planets, 

A male child. 



Exercise 295. 



est 



ed 

ing 

ing 



ed, hig 



er 



Sly ness 

The net weight. 

The catch of a buckle. 

The organ of speech and taste. 



Labor s 

Journey s 

Exercise 296. 

The brink; to tend. 
A rod ; a mace. 



ed 
ed 



mg 
ing 



* UjMmaddini the saffixes, the final Z of BiiallfianialljdoiliM. tAko,«irff^ 



n 



JMALJmCAL VAUUMi. 



Weather s 

Wether s 

Choler io 

Collar 8 



Profit 

Pro[Aet 

Tonsil 

Tonsile 

Bruit 

Brute 



ed iog 



icness 
ed 



ed 
ic 



ed 
al 



ing 



ing 
ioal 



ThetiaUffiheair; to air; to endtm* 

A sheep* 

Wrath ful fulness 

SometMhg worn round the neck ; to collar 



£xEmci8K 297. 



ed 



Benefit s 

One who predicts. 
A gland in the ihroaU 
That may he clipped. 
Rumor s ed 

s ly 



ing 
aluess Beast 



ing 



ing 
linest 



ExERciss 298. 

Crewel s Yawn twisted and wound on a haU, 

Cruel ty ly ness Inhuman ity ly 

/ Groom s A person who tends horses; a servanU 

Grume s ous ousnessClot s y 

Hoop 8 ed ing To Mnd with hoops^ or bands. 

Whoop 8 ed ing Shout s ed ing 

Exercise 299. 

Pool • A small collection of water. 

Poule The stakes of parties at game. 

Room y iness A spax:e or apartment. 

Rheum y atic atism Watery matter secreted hy the glands* 

Rood 8 Thejourth of an acre; the cross. 

Rude ly nees esl Rough ly ness est 



Bough 

Bow 

Council 

Counsel 

Flour 

Flower 



Foul 

Fowl 

Rout 

Route 

Abel 

AW* 



8 

8 ed 

8 or 

8 or 

8 ed 



er 

er ed 

8 ed 

8 



mg 

ed 
ing 

y 



ly 

ing 
ing 



Exercise 300. 

Branch es 

Bend; an act of respect^ or retserence* 

Assembly es 

Advice ; to advise* 

Meal; to convert into meal* 

The blossom of a plant. 

Exercise ^1* 



Filthy er ness 

Bird ; to kill fowls. 

A rathU; also, to defecd^ 

Road 8 

A man^s name. 

Strong er est 



ly 



AKALTilCAL WLAMWL^ 



TT 



Anele 

Anneal 

Baron 

Barren 

Battel 

Battle 



Beer 

Bier 

Bile 

Boil 

Boy 

Buoy 



Breach 

Breech 

Broach 

Brooch 

Cauf 

Cough 



Cease 

Seize 

Colonel 

Kernel 

Cymbal 

Symbol 



Dear 
Deer 

Dollar 
Dolor 
Doce 
Dodge 



Dose 
Doze 

Dual 
Duel 



ing 



8 ed 

8 ed ms 

et age ial 

nesser eft 



ing 



EZBBCBU 303. 

Anoint 8 ed 

To heai; to temper by heat, 
A title qfnohiUty; a peer. 
Sterile ity er 

To make fertile; to grow fat. 
Combat 8 ed 

£xj:aciSK 30X 



ing 



ing 



8 

ious 



A liquor made of maU and hops, 
A frame for conveying the dead. 
Gall y 

ing To agitate violently with heat ; to seethe, 
khoAssil male ehUd; a youth, 

ing A ^floating block tied to a weight; to hear up. 

Exercise 304. 

The act of breaking ; a gap. 

The lower part of the body, 

A spit ; to spit, or pierce. 

A jewel; a breastpin; to adorn with jewels, 
s A chest to keep live fish in water, 

8 ed ing il convulsion of the lungs ; to cough. 



ly 



ed 
iah 
ed 



ed 
ed 



jng 
ing 



ed 
ed 

3 

io 



er 



ing 
ing 
ship 



ize 



est 



8 
8 

8 

8 ed 



ous ifio 



mg 



8 ed ing 

8 ed ing 

ity istic 

ist 8 er 



Exercise 305. 

Stop 8 ed ing 

Catch es ed ing 

The commander of a regiment. 

The edible substance in the sheU of a nui. 

A musical instrument. 

Emblem s atic atixe 

Exercise 306. 

Beloved; costly. 

An animal. 

A silver coin. 

Chief ; pain. 

The chief magistrate of Venice. 

To start aside. 

Exercise 307. 

A certain portion of medicine ; to dose* 

Slumber 

Expressingy or pertaining to two. 

A combat betfoeen two. 



76 



ASjumcAL hahtal. 



Falther 


s 


ed 


ing 


The male parmU; alio, to adopt. 


Farther 


s 


ed 


ing 


Further s ed ing 
Exercise 308. 


Ferrule 








A metal ringf or hand. 


Ferule 








An kuirumentfor correcting children. 
A jerk of ^finger from the thumb. 


Fillip 


8 


ed 


ing 


Phillip 


S 






A man^s name. 


Filter 


S 


ed 


ing 


A strainer ; to percolate. 


Philter 


8 


ed 


ing 


A love-potion; to exciU by love-potions. 
Exercise 309. 


Fir 


8 






A tree. 


Fur 


S 


ier 


ed 


Finexsofi hair ; to Une with fur. 


Gamble 


s 


ed 


ing 


To game, or play for money. 


Gambol 


8 


ed 


ing 


Frisk 8 ed ing 


Gentile 


ize 


ism 


ish 


Pagan ize ism ish 


Gentle 


ness er 


est 


Meek ness er est 










Exercise 310. 


Grope 


8 


ed 


ing 


To search, or seek by feeling. 


Group 


8 


ed 


ing 


Cluster 8 ed ing 


Grisly 


ness 




Frightful ness 


Grizzly- 








Somewhat gray. 


Gutter 


8 


ed 


ing 


A channel, or passage for water ; to gutter 


Gultur 


al 


ally 


alness Throat y 










Exercise 311. 


Halo 


s 






A luminous circle round the sun or moon. ' 


Hallow 


8 


ed 


ing 


To make holy. 


Hoarse 


ly 


er 


ness 


Having a harsh, rough voice or sound. 


Horse 


8 






An animal. 


Idle 


8 


ed 


er 


Unemployed ; to be unemployed. 


Idol 


8 


ize 


ism 


An image worshiped as a deity. 


Idyl 


8 






A short pastoral poem. 
Exercise 312. 


Key 


8 






That which serves to lock and unlock. 


Quay* 


8 






A tmU, or wharf. 


Ketch 


es 






A kind of ship. 


Catch 


es 


ed 


ing 


Seize s ed ing 


Lac 








A resinous substance. 


Lack 


8 


ed ' 


' ing 


Want 8 ed ing 



* Abo, key. 



ANALYTICAL MANUAL. 



70 











Exercise 31^ 


Loam 


s 


y 


ed 


Rich unctuous earth ; to cover with ham. 


Loom 


8 






A weaver's machine. 


Lord 


S 


ed 


ing 


Domineer s ed ing 


Laud 


S 


ed 


ing 


Praise s ed ing 


MaDor 


8 


fal 




The estate or jurisdiction of a lord. 


Manner 


S 


ly 


ism 


Mode ; mein ; peculiar way. 


Manna 








A gum, or honey-like juice. 
Exercise 314. 


Mark 


8 


ed 


ing 


A line ; also, to make marks. 


Marque 








License for reprisals. 


Medal 


S 


ist* 


ic* 


A coin, or piece of metal in the form of coin. 


Meddle 


S 


ed 


ing 


Interfere s ed ing 


Missal 


s 






A mass-book. 


Missile 


s 






That may he thrown, or sent. 
Exercise 315. 


Order 


8 


ed 


ing 


Regulate s ed ing 


Ordure 








Dung; filth. 


Palate 


8 


able 


al 


The roof of the mouth ; taste. 


Pallet 


8 






A small bed. 


Pearl 


S 


ed 


y 


A gem ; a speck on the eye* 


Purl 


S 


ed 


ing 


To murmur, as a brook. 
Exercise 316. 


Pedal 








Pertaining to the foot. 


Peddle 


er 


ed 


ing 


To be busy in trifles ; to deal in small wares* 


Pendant 


8 






A jewel hanging from the ear ; a small flags 
Hanging; depending. 


Pendent 


ce 


cy 




Pillar 


8 


ed 




Column s ar 


Pillow 


8 


ed 


ing 


A cushion for the head ; to rest on. 
Exercise 317. 


Pistil 


8 






The part of a flower that receives the pollen. 


Pistol 


8 


et 




A small hand sun. 
A gold coin of Spain. 


Pistole 


8 






Place 


8 


ed 


ing 


Position ; locality ; to put in a place. 


Plaice 


S 






Aflatflsh. 


Pointal 


8 






Pistil s 


Pointel 


8 






Something on a point ; a pencil. 



* Upon addix^ this sufiGbc, the final I of medtd m ufluaUy doufalod 



80 



ANALTTICAL MAN17AL. 



Portion 

Potion \ 

Price 

Prize 

Reason 

Raisin 



Regal 

Regale 

Rigor 

Rigger 

Serge 

Surge 



Serrate 

Cerate 

Skull 

Scull 

Sleave 

Sleeve 



Sorrel 

Sorel 

Statue 

Statute 

Surcle 

Circle 



Tract 

Track 

Tomb 

Tome 

Urn 

Earn 



Vary 
Very 
Vassal 
Vessel 



8 ed 

s 

8 ed 

8 ed 

8 less 

8 



ly ity 
meat ed 



ed ion 
ed 

8 



ed 
ed 



8 
S 
8 

8 et 



ate 



8 

s 

8 

8 

8 ed 
8 ed 



es ed 

ty ly 



mg 

ing 
ing 
er 



ing 



Exercise 318. 

Part; to parcel. 

A draught, or drink. 

The value set or demanded ; to value. 

Something taken ly adventure ; to rate* 

The faculty of discerning and judging, 

A dried grape. 

Exercise 319. 



mg 



ure 



mg 



Royal ly ty 

Refresh ment ed 

Strictness; severity. 
One who rigs vessels. 
A kind of woolen cloth. 
Billow 8 y 

Exercise 320. 

Indented on the edge, like a saw. 

An ointment made of wax and oil. 

The bone inchsing the brain. 

A small boat ; a shoal offish. 

The entangled part of thread ; also, to sley. 

The part of a garment that covers the arm* 

Exercise 321. 



A plant of a sourish taste ; a faint red. 
A buck (fihe third year. 
.Image s 

ory able Law s ful 

A shoot ; ttoig. 
A round figure ; a ring. 



ed 



Exercise 322. 



less ed 



ation A region ; a treatise. 
Trace; vestige. 

A monument over a grave ; to bury. 
Volume s 

A kind of vase ; to put in an urn. 
To gain by labor. 



mg 
ing 



Exercise 323^ 



ing Alter s ed ing 

est True th ly est 

A dependant ; a serf ; a slave. 

AcaskyOrutensilforholding liquids; a»hip^ 



AirittflCAL HANtTJO. 



81 



Analyze, 

Ascetic, 
Ascitic, 
Asperate, 
A^nrate, 



Auricle, 

Oracle, 

Binacle, 

Binocle, 

Battens, 

Buttress, 



SECTION xvr.* 

WORDS OF SIBtlLAR SOUND CONTINUED. 
£xE&cux 324. 

to resolve a compooiu) into its elements. 

to write annals ; to narrate. 

a recluse; a hermit. 

dropsical* 

to make lough. 

to pronouice wi^ full lireatii. 

ExKRCisx 325. 

the external ear ; an i^pendage of the heilrt. s 

somediing uttered hy supernatural wisdom. 

a oompass-box. s 

a kind of telescope. \ s 

an iuBtroment £ot paring the hoo& of horses. 

a prop, or support; to prop. es ed ing 



ed 


ing 


tist 


ed 


jng 


fist 


8 


ism 




al 






ed 


ing 


ion 


ed 


ing 


ion 


s 
s 


art 
art 


^ 



Exercise 326. 

Calendar, a i«gister of times ; an almanac ; to register, s 

Calender, to smooth by pressing between rollers. s 

Capitsl, principal; a large letter ; the top of a column, s 

Capitol, the edifice occupied by the legislature. 

Cavalier, a hovseman ; a xnight ; brave ; haughty. 

Cavilor, one who cavils ; a captious disputant. 

Exercise 327. 

Centaury, the name of a plant, and a genus of plants. 

Century, a hundred ; a companY of 100 men. 

CetaiMoaa, pertaining to the whale ; of the whale kind. 

Setaceous, pertaining to bristles ; bristly. ^ 

Character, a mark or letter ; that which distinguishes.^ 

Caricature, a distorted representation ; to represent lu- 
dicrously. 

Exercise 328. 

Chronical, relatii^ to tame ; continuing a long time. 

Chronicle, to register events in the oraer of time. 

Cilidaus, consisting of hair. 

Silicious, pertaining to silex ; flinty. 





ed 


ing 




ed' 


ing 




|y 


ize 




lan 


ine 




ly 


ness 


es 






es 


al 


ate 



ize ism ed 



1st 



ed 



er ed ing 



* For tbe mode of preparing the written exercise in this Seetioo, see model, p. 85. 
t Vposi adding ut, drop xe and ize of analyze and amiaUxe, 
% Upon adding or and orly, iamt tbe letter « between e and J of the radical: 
this, soBMndaKi 

11 



AVAI.Y7ICAL MANUiO*. 



Cognation, relatioosliip ; kindred. 

Cognition, knowledge deriyod from experience* 

ExsBcisx 339. 

Colation, the act of straining liquor. 8 

Collation, the act of laying together ; a gift ; a repast. 8 
Complement, that which completes ; the fnfl quantity. el 
Conipliment, an expression of civility ; praise. 
Conndant,* one intrusted with secrets. 
Confident, trusting, relying, folly assured ; bold. 



Corporal, 

Corporeal, 

Deformity, 

ItiffOTmity, 

Dependant,* 

Dependent, 



Descension, 

Dissension, 

Deviser, 

Devisor, 

Divisor, 

Elector, 

Electre, 



Elision, 

Elysian, 

Elicit, 

Illicit, 

Emanant, 

Eminent 



Exercise 330. 

relating to the body; the lowest officer of 

infantry, 
having a body ; not spirituaL 
the state of being deformed ; uglineae. 
irregularity of fonn. es 

* one sustained or appointed by anolJier. b .. 

hanging down; subject to ; at the disposal o£ ce ' 



fiS 


aUy 


«iy 


ce 


iai 


ly 


% 


ity 
ist 





8 
9- 
.8 
8 
S 
8 

ic 



Exercise 331. 

the act of going down ; descent. 

disagreement; strife. 

one who contrives, or invents ; a contriver* 

one who grants, or gives by wiH. 

the number that cUvides. 

one who elects, or has the right of choice. 

amber.f ' 

Exercise 33^. 

the^act of cutting off a vowel. 

pertaining to Elysium ; veiy delightfuL 

to draw out ; to bring to light, ed 

not allowable ; unlawful. ly 

issuing, or flowing from. 

high ; txalted in rank or office ; conspicuous, ce 



cy 



al, 
idty ify 



mg 
nesB 008 

ly cy 



Exercise 333. 

Empirical, experimental ; versed in experiments. ly 

Empyrical, containing the combustible principle of coal. 

Empyreal, formed of pure fire, or light; pure; refined. 

Imperial, relating to an empire or emperor ; royal. ist ty ized 



* Confidant and dependant are often, and more correctly written, confident, de« 
pendent. 

t " By friction, amber becomes strongly electric; from which property originated 
the name and science of electricitv, n^tKTpov [elecirm]t being the Greek word for 
smber." Ency Amer., vol. i., p. 24. 



AMiLttUiil, UJMVAl. 



88 



Gxonasey 



Faetiliotu, 

Fictiidoiis, 

Pinary,* 

Finery, 

Fonnally, 

Foniterly^ 



Qlntinons, 

GluttonaiiB, 

History, 

Histrion, 

Honorary, 

Qnerary, 



Humeral, 

Humoral, 

Imminent, 

Immanent, 

Inciaiont 

LuitioQi 



iDfienioiiiSa 

Ingennons, 

Intension, 

Intention, 

Licorice, 

Lickerish, 



Lineament, 

Liniment, 

Literal, 

Littoral, 

Millenary, 

Millinery, 

Millicmary, 



to exert; tomdn; to use. «4 lag er 

to- adjure by a liofy name; to expd «nl spir- 
its, ad iag er 

Ex£&citB 334. 

miuie by art ; artificial. 

feigned; imaginary. ly nest ^ 

the second forge at the iron mills. es 

show ; showy articles of dress. 

according to finrm, or role ; stiffly ; predsely. 

in time past ; heretofi^re. 

ExsaciSE 335. 

luving the nature of ghie ; yiscoos. new 

having the nature of a glutton ; ^eedy. ly 

a narrative of past events ; description. icf ically an 

a sta^e-player, a theatrical performer. ic ically ism 

pertaming to, or conferring honor. 

pertaining to, or comprising a burden. 

Exercise 336. 

pertaining to the shoulder, 
pertaining to, or proceeding from humors, 

nnpending; threatening. ce 

inherent; intrinsic; internal. cy 

a cutting into ; a wound. s 

a setting in; an insertion, or grafting. s 

Exercise 337. 

possessing genius ; havin|; skin or aptitude, ly nets 

nrank; fair; open; candid. ly ness 

the act of strobing, or straining. s 

design; purpose; aim. a al 
a root of a sweetish taste, 

dainty ; delicate in the choice of food* ly nest 

Exercise 338. • 

feature; form; outline. a 

ointment. s ' 

pertaining to the letter ; not figurative. ly ity ist 

pertaining to the shore. 

a thousand years ; consisting of a thousand, 

articles made by milliners ; as, bonnets, dec, * 

pertaining to, or consisting of millions. 



alJy 



Exercise 339. 
Monetary, pertaining to money ; pecimiary. 



AJMO^Jhwry 



t Upon adding ic and ieaUft drop tha iML t| cC kUVn^i. 



84 



JLgALTnCAk MMmAU 



WLcmtary^ tai£iig to warn or adviaa ; advitiBf. ni 

Ordinance, a law; a nil^ or appomtDkenl. a 

Oninanoe^ 6annon; artillery. 

Ordonnance, the disposition oi figures in a pdcture. 

Orison, a prayer ; 'Supplicanoa* a 

Horizon, the line whicn bounds tlie view* tal* tali^taBj 

EXERGISK 940. 

Partition, that which separates ; to separate. a ' ed ing 

Petition, an earnest request, or prayer ; to ioBcit. a ^ ing 

Passable, that may be passed ; tolerable. ness 'fy 

Passible, susceptible oi feeUng. nesa ity 

Populace, the common people ; the multitude. 

Populous, hm of people, or inhabitants. mis 



'EiMtLcnm 341. 

Potable, that may be drank; drinkable. 

Portable, that may be easily earned. 

Precedent, gcnngbcKfore; anterior; an examine. e 

President, one who presides over othen witn authority, a 

Presentment, the act of presenting. a 

Pres^timent, a previous notion or impression. a 



ed 

ial 



a 
ship 



ExERCiSB 343. 

Principal, chief; the head; a sum of money at iirtereet. a ity fy 

Principle, an original cause; foundaticm; rule of actioM. a 

Radical, pertaining to a root ; a primitive word. s ly iqf 

Kadicle, the germ of the root ; a young root. a 

Reticule, a small net ; a small bag of net-woik. a ar 

Ridicule, cofttemptuoaa laughter ; to deride. a ti«a ad 

£xE&ci8x 343. ^ 

Salvation, the act of saving; deUvenaee. "^ 

Salivation,! the act of salivathig. 

Spiritous, partaking dP the nature of spirit ; refinedl. nesa 

Spirituous, containing spirit ; ardent. nesa 

Stationary, fixed ; not progressive or retrogressive. 

Stationery, articles sold by stationers, as pens, &c. 

ExfiMim 344. 

Subtilty, thinness; fineness. ea 

Subtlety, artfulness; cunning. ea 

Tarrier, one who tarriea or delays. s- 

Terrier, a dog that fellows his game under grooBd. s 

Vertical, being at the zenith. ly nesa 

Vortical, having a whirling motion. 



■ * The t before the suffizee, is merely s up h mie. 
t JBm note CB Salhrate, page 111. 



I 

o 

H 



I 



1 



Ik* 
D 









t 

^ 



^ 



6? 



^" 



&r* 



AVALTnOML WkMUML. 




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mu 

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§lili« 



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ll 



=3 ll.§ sill i 



bS'^ SSbS 



III 



.5 



t III tfll -a 

J -g 

§ "b-isl i nil « 

krrli i 11^.1 I 

C4 H 



•SaJS.^ fi^5.2 fc^ 



,Sgi .-S « a. 

111 1.5 § 

'S a J s 

17 55 o .a 0^ £ 
■* i? ** IB '^ S. 



^ s 

-s 1 



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OS 01 cs S g 



i: 






o^ . P o4 S ♦• B jl^ 



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5 >^.Sqq 



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AKALTTICAI, KASViX.. 



87 



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AXLALTtJCAL KAXUAL. 



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AMALTTIOAL KiSUAI,. 




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AlCiXTTICAL KAinTAL. 



91 




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3 B 3 rt § 



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f?^t>e:t^ 



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93 



ANALTTICAL XAMTTAL* 



ic 

ated 

ean 



AtwHiilon ed 
Aboyaiice 

AfnmexJ^ ate 
Adamant iae 
Adipoae 
Alabaflter 
AJacrity 



AJbtno 8 

AlcbemyH icalfut 
AJcolud ic ize 

Ateebra ic ical 
A£a3i ea 



Allegcny 



ict 

8 



SECTION XVf 

ExKRciSB 362. 

er meat De«ert ed ing er km 

AwaUinginlaw; iomeihinginrevenvm 
ically lam Schoolt ar astic aatically 
aling atioB Atharppoint; quickness of itudUet* 

A sUme of extreme hardness ; diamond. 

Fat er est nesB y 

A Tdnd ofwhiU marble. 

Promptness; briskness. 

ExE&ciSE 363*. 

Apenon unnMturcdly fchitc 
isdcal ixe Art ofehanpng base intopreemms metolff 
ized ization Pure^ or kigh^ rectified spirit, 

A vessel used w distilling. 
ically iat A sort ofunhersal arithmttie* 
me eaoentf ize A salt that neutraUzes adds. 
ically ist ize Parable** ic ically 
Calendar a 



Alphabet io 
Amalgam ate 
Amaranth ine 
Ambroiiaf t al 
Amethyst me 
Ammooiaf f ac 
Amulet a 
Aachoyy ea 



Ancillny 

Anemone . 

AatimoBLy al 

Appanage 

Axpulme 

^Arable 

Azaneoiu 



Exxftcisx 364. 

ical ically arian I%e letters of a langtuLgedtdyarrangeA 
ated atmg ation A mixture of mercury mthojSodmmiUiaL 

A JUnoer that never fades. 
an ac The fahUd food of the gods ; a dmsUy. 

A precious stone of a xmUI color. 
acal A volatile aUcaU ; a drug. 

A charm against evil or miscMtf* 

A smaUfiM used for sauce. 

EzxaciSE 365. 

Pertaining to a nudd^ervmiL 
The idna-flower. 
oua ated A mineral substance. 

Lands assigned to younger children. 
Belonging to the eagle; hooked. 
Tillable. 
Like a cotnoeb. 



Arbiter ate atrix amentable Umpire 



* For the form of the written exercise, see Model 9, psj^ 63. 
t Beftve addSnf the snflbes, drop the final v of the radwal. 
t Ihop one a of sehooU upon'ddding the snmxes. 

i'the e hi acumen, beo(nnes t hi me deriyathres ; thus, acumtnata 
Also written alehimy and alchymy. 
T Drop the final t of alkali, apon adduig esesnt. 

** Between & and Z of |NnvUe, Insert an in the darinithwfonns; tfaoib ptiahsHib 
if The final a is to be dropped, upon adduig the suffixes. 



ANJLLrnCAL KANtTAt. 



£XXB€|IE 366. 

Aidma tie tize tons laa:6oi^Th^pri$ie^pUqffiafpramt€mjp^^ 

Aiquebme ler ade* ^ A hand gun; acahver. 

AneiuJ 8 ' Annory es 

Arsenic al ate ated outf A mineral jffoisan. 

Arfceiy es al Av^Hle<meewn^Uoodfrom(heluart 

Arthntist ic ieal A disease of ike joinU; a»^ Ihe gout. 

ArtDleiy Ordnance 

Anupsce§ y m Augor y a iai 

£xBaciSE 367. 



AAphatoofttSie ita 

AssasfliA ate ated aticm ator 

Assemble ed age a ing 



Asylum 

Asthma 

Attitude 

Attorney 

Atidad 



tic tical 

8 

8 ship 

ity oouy oiiMieie 



Bitomenll ons ate ated 13» 

A secret fmurdenr* 

Congregate ed ion 8 mg 

A place ofrefiige ; a sanctuary. 

Shortness ofbreaQh ; dyspnaa. 

Posture 8 

An agent, specially in law business^ 

Bold nessly , er est 



ExxRCisx 368. 



Aurora 

Anapice 

AuxUi 

Avalanche 

Avarice 

Average 

Axillar 

Bachanal 



iowiouslyi 
aiy atoiy ariee 
a 

iofosioualyioasness 
a ed ing 

y . 

a um 



The dawn of day. 

An omen from btrds ; proUetion ; fimfr.- 

Aid ant s 

A snouhslip ; a mass (^ sliding i 

Cupidity 

Amedudsum; to reduce to at 

Pertaitdng to the arm-pit. 

£.eveler 8 



EXBBCISE 369. 



Bachelor a 
Badinage 
BacateOe 

Bakony ea 

Balderdash ed 

Baluster ed 

Barbecue a 

Barnacle a 



alup 



mg e8 
adef 8 
ed ing 



One v^ has not been masrrisd. 
Light, or playful talk. 
A trifle. 
Gallery es 

Ajcrgonofiosrds; to aduUersUe* 
A smaU column, or pilaster, 
A hog or other animal roasted uihole. 
A sMU'fish often four^ on the^ bottom 
of ships ; a species of goose. 



EzxBCiax 370. 



BBStinade**8 ing ed 
Bayonet a ing ed 



Cudgel 8 ing ed 

A dagger fixed to a mUsket ; tobayontU 



* Arquehusade rigmfies the shot, or diechaige of an aequebiifle ; abo, a disdilsd 
liqiier ftr a irpand or bmiaa. 
t Upon addmg ous, drop the final letter [c] of carsenic, 
X Thelait <iMlettofBoftfaiBir«id, aretobeomHtoduponaddhigthesaffiiML 
4 Also, karuspiee* 

I In the derirative fioima, the e hi bitameni is ohanged into t ; m, bttmnlnoai. 
% Balusitrtde^SLfmssfMmtsTs. ^ Also, &««ltiMK(ia 



94 



AJfALTTICAXf XAinrAX,. 



Beleaguer s 

Bistoury es 

BoftsteiDCis ly 
Bombasiii 

Bucanier* s 

Bucolic a 



cd ing 



JBeaiege a ed ing er 
A surgical instrument fir incMtofif. 
Lctud ; furious. 

A slight stuff made of silk and wor$ted* 
Pirate a cy ical kally 

A pastoral poem. 



£X£ECI8E 371. 



Bulletin a 

Cabaret a 

Cabinet a 
Cadaverona nesa 

Calandtyf ona onaly 

Calibeit a 
Calico 

Caliginona neta 



An official report ; a notice. 
Tavern a 

Ctoset ; seUet council ; set of drawers* 
Like a dead body ; ghasdy. 
IHaaater oua oualy onsneaa 
The lore of a gun ; cafocU^, 
Cotton doth, umte or printed. 
Dark nesa 



EXEECISE 372. 

Calomel A preparation of mercury. 

Calumet a An Indian smoking pipe. 

Calmnny ona onsly ated atory Slander oua ously ed 

Camerate ed ing ation Arch ed ing 

Caniator a A small basket ; a box^ er case. 

Cannibal a ly iam One who eats human flesh. 

Canopv es ad ing A covering over the head ; (o canopy* 

Cantulate a ed ing ion Chant a ed ing 



ExsiiciSE 373. 



Caparison a ed ing 
CapiU ary§ aceoua amentf 
Caravan a aary|| 
Carbuncle a ed arlT 
Carcanet a 
Cardinal** ly 
Carminative 
Carpenter a y 



Trappings ; to decTc with trappings* 

Ahaxr* 

A company, or body of travelers. 

A red gem; a pimple ; an ulcer. 

A chain, or cottar of jewels^ 

Principal ly 

Expelling wind ; a medicine. 

A builder of houses, or ships. 



Camon 

Cartilage inoua 
Carancle arU atedf 
Caaeous 
Caatanet a 



£xERCisE 374. 

Dead and putrefying fl^sh. 
Gristle y 
Tubercle ar^f ouslf 
Having the nature of cheese. 
A snuM shell of ivory or wood, to keep 
time wiOi in dancing. 



* Also, bueaneer. t Drop the final y here, befbre adding the suffixaa. 

t Alflo, calibre, ^ 

i CapiUory, hair«19Le, l e. mimite ; also, a faets tube, or tbbibI : — eof^XUnnsntf a 
fine thread, filament or fibre. |I Caravansary, a kind of inn for caravana. 

T Upon adding this suffix, insert « beCore 2 of tiie radical ; thus, caibmicttlar. 
** Cardinal is also the name of an officer, next in rank to the Tope, 



aNALTTICAL kantal. 



05 



Cftstinte ed "^ ing kn or Chastise ed ing meat 
Ccaxu ' xy* ier* ierly cade* Ahorse. 
Celebrate )M isg or ion Praise 



ion 
ExxaciBE 375. 



ed ing er 



Celery 

Celibate cy 
Cemetery es 
CepiiaHc 
Cerebral 

Ceremony es al 
Cespitoosf itions 
Chameleon ize ized 



ally 



Aipedes of parsley, used as a udad* 
Single life* 
Aj^ace of interment. 
Pertaining to the head. 
Pertaining to the brain. 
Rite es ual nally 

Turfy 

An animal of the lizard kind^ tul(jid 
to changes of color. 



Exercise 376. 



Champion s 

Chancellor s 

Chanticleer s 

Chaperont s 

Chariot 8 

Charlatan s 

Chevalier a 

Chivalry! oua 



ess 
ship 

ed 
eer 



ical 



Cheveril ize[| ized 

ChiHadlF ast 

Ch3mera§ s ical 
Chocolate 

Christian ity ize 
Chrysalis 

Cicatrix** izeffized 
Cicerone 



Cinnamon 

Citadel 

Clandestine 

Clavated 

Climacter 



Combatant s 

Judgeof a court of equity; aprendetiL 
A clear, or laud crower ; a cock. 
A hood worn by knights of the garter, 
ing A half-coach ; to convey in a charity 
Empiric s ism Si 
Knij^ht s hood ly 
Knighthood; valor. 

Exercise 377. 

izing A kid, or leather of kid-skin. 

A thousand ; the millennium. 
ically A fabulous numster ; a wHd notum. 

A preparation of the cocoa-nut. 
ly ism Pertaining to Christ. 

The form of certain insects, as huUer^ 
flies, before they become vmged. 
ization izant A scar. 

A guide who explains curiosities. 

Exercise 378. 

The inner bark of a species of lavrd* 
Fortress es 
ness Secret ly ness 

Club-diaped. 
ical ic A criticcd period, or year inhumanUfe. 



a 



* Cava^, troops on horseback; — Cavalier, a horseman; also, gay; haughty; 

CtmaUade, a procession on horseback. 

t Remove oua, before adding the other suffix. 

t As a verb, chaperon is to attend a lady in public. 

^ Drop the last letter of this word, upon adding the terminations. 

II (jheoerilixe, to make pliable as kid leather. 

T The last two letteis of this word, are to be omitted, upon adding another termi* 
nation. 

** Also, eieairies. The termination, ta?, is to be omitted, before the suffixes an 
added. tt Cieatrixe, is to heal, or skin over. 



M 



ARALTTtCAL KAmTAL. 



Cochineal 


» 






An i$ueet uftd in dyimg icaarUL 


CbcWca* 


atef ated 


aiy 




A ierew ; UUraUjft a anotf.' 


Cohobate 


ed ing 


atum 




To dUtm repeatedly. 








E:(XRCi8JE 379. 


Colonade 


8 






A ranee ofcdumni. 


Colony* 


ize ist 


ized izatioQ A body ofptopU draimfrom(Mrnar 
Hve Uma, to dwdL in a provmet* 


CploBSTist 


al ean 








Colmnbary 


es 






Adove-coU 


Columbine 


8 






A genu9 of plants. 

Rdating to popular ouerMui, 


Comitial 








Condiment 


8 






Seasoning a 


Contrary 


ety ly 


ne88 


0U8 


Opposite ness ly 








Exercise 380. 


Conundrum 


8 






A sort of riddle orjesU 
That which unites ; a de. 


Copula*' 


ate ative 






Coriander ^ 








A genus of plants. 

A bird that preys upon fish; affiujtkn. 


Cormorant 


8 






Corollary 


ea 






Inference 8 


Corridor 


8 






OaUery round a huilding. 


Coruscate 


ed ing 


atianaBtl 


Flash ed ing 


Corybantic 








Inflamed liJce the Coryhantes.W 








Exercise 381. 


Corymb 


0U8 ubusated 




A topf head, or cluster. 


Coemeticl" 








Beautifying ; thai which heautyUt. 


Cosmiralf 


ly 






Relating to (he world, or untioerst. 


Coterie 


8 






Associatitm 8 


Cothumate** ated 






BusJcined ; relating to tragedy. 
Kind of dance; tune for a eatdUm. 


Cotillon 


8 






Cremation 








A burning. 


Crenate 


ed 






Notched 








Exercise 382. 


Crepitate 


ed ing 


ation 




Crackle ed ing 


CrepuBculeffar oua 


ine 




Twilight 


Cretaceous 








Chalky ness 


Cucullate 


^d 






Hooded 



* Drop the Vui letter of this word, upon adding another tenninatkni. 

t Cochleate, having the forai of a screw ; spiraL 

% The hut two lettera of this word, are to be omitted, iqKm adding another torn 
nation. § Drop ate of oorasoate, before adiing cut 

B Priests of Cybele, who, daring their festival, acted as if deUrions er mad. 

T Cosmetic and co^nical are both from Kovfus, .{cosmos) — a Gwek wonrdt wfaMi 
means order, regularity, ornament ; and which, smce these qualities are £md iu 
perfection in the system of the w(^d, thence came to signify, also, ths world; lAa 
ftntterse. 

** Cothurnus m the Latin name of a sort of buskin, reaohmg to the middle of tlia 
€«lf, ai^ having very thick soles of cork, worn by the ancient tragic acton. 

ft Also, crepusete* ^ 



INAITTICAL ICAinrlL. 



« 



Cnciimber 

Cactui»t ftceons 

Culinary 

Culmen* ate ated ates 



Cultivate ed ing or 

Culverin s 

Cupola 8 

Cupreous . 
Curmudgeon ly a 

Custody al 

Cyclopsf ean ic 



Cylinder ic ical oid 

Dafibdilt s 

Damascene 8 

Dandelion 

Debenture 

Debonair ity ly ness 

December 

Denizen ed ing s 



Diapei 

Diary 

Diurnal 

Didactic 

Didapper 

Dilettante 

Disciple 

Domestic 



Domicileif 

Dotterel 

Duenna 

Dynam 

Dynast 

Delicate 



s 
es 



ed 
ist 

[yal 



mg 
an 



shipinell iflary able 
ate ated ally ation 



The name of a plant and itsfruU. \ 
A gourd ; a chendeal vessel. 
Pertaining to the kitcken, 
Btioo* The top ; the highest point, 

EXERCISE 3^. 

ion Till ed ing er 

A species of ordnance ; a cannon. 
Dome 8 

Coppery , 

A miser ; a churl. 
Guard ing 

Fabled giants, having hut one eye in 
theferehead. 

Exercise 384. 

aceous A long circular lody. 

A plant of the genus narcissus. 
* Damson 

A plant. 

A certificate ofdeht, or of a datm. 

CourtPx)us nessly 

TJie last month in the year. 

Citfzen ize ized izes 

Exercise 386. 

Figured linen cloth ; to variegaU* 

Journal 8 ist 

Daily 

Instructive ly 

A diving-bird. 

A lover, or promoter of the fine arts* 

Pupil age 

Pertaining to home. 

Exercise 386. 



iaryed iate iating An abode ; afijced residence. 

a A kind of bird. 

a Governess es 

ic ical ic8 Strength ; power. 

ic y Sovereign ly ty 

cy ly ou8ly**ou8nes3 Dainty nessly 



* The e of culmra becomes t in the derivatives ; as, cuhntnation. This last word 
is often used to signify the transit of a planet over the meridian, or hi^est point of 
altitude. t Drop the final letter of this word, upon adding tne suffixes. 

t We have, also, daffodilly and daffodowndilly. 

^ Dilettanti is the plural. <* 

j] The form, discipline, unplies instruction coupled with order; hence, as a Tect. it 
signifies, to instruct and govern ; to regulate by training. 

T Also written domicil. 

** Drop ate of delicate, before adding ous and ousness 

13 



Bbcmy,. 

Bchintid 



Eclaircise 

EcUtci 

iklible 

Edema 

Egotistt 

Elastic 

Element 

Elephant 



ize used 
ate* ated 



AJUIiTTICAL MANUAI*. 

mng A heavy, hard^ black toood.. 

A hedge-hog ; a prickly shell-fiiK 



ExEECiSE 387* 



ed 

ity 

tons 
ical 



ed 



ing 

0U8 

toae 

i8in§ 

al 

ary 



ed ing ationf 



mg 



Elixate 

Elixir 8 

Embargo ed ing 

Embassy ador|| 

Embrasure s 

Emerald a 



Emery 
Emetic 



es 
al 



ally 



mentf Explain 

Greedy 

Eatable 
tie A dropsical swelling. 

One who says nmch about himself* 

Springy ness 
aKty Bnly AJirst principle ; <m ingredient. 

Tne largest of quadrupeds. 

Exercise. 388. 

8 To extract by boiling. 

A tincture ; quintessence ; a ccrdial. 

es Prohibition^ or to prohibit from saiUng 

A sderrm message ; a public functi^^ 
An opening in a wall for cannon* 
A precious stone, green in colfr. 
A mineral used in polishing sted» 
Vomit ive 



EXEBCISE 389. 



Emulate 
EncomiTun 

Enigma 

Environ 

Epicure** 

Epulary 

EpalotLC 

Bremite 



ed 

astir 

tist 

ed 

ean 

ation§ 



U 



ing ion . ous§ Kival ed ing 

asticf Paiiegyric istIF icallF 

ticallytical tic RiddUe er ingly 
.ing^ Surroi«id ed ,ing 

eanismism ize One givt^ to Ivjcurious living. 

Festive ity 

Cicatrizing ; u healing substance. 



age 



ical 



Hermit 
Exercise 390. 



age 



ical 



Eruginous 
Escnalot 
Esculapian 
Esotery ic 



Pertaining to copper, or rust ofcoppej 
A species of onion or gaHic. 
Pertaining to^sculapius»^ff medical 
Privacy; secrecy. 



* The final lettenr [us] of echinus, are to be omitted in the derivotiTes. Edi4nat€ 
lignifies, set with prickles. 

t These word are written eclaircissement — explanation. 

t We have, also, the form egoist^ which is used to designate a person who doubts, 
or affects to doubt, the existence of every thing but himself, 

4 Upon adding this suffix, the last three letters of the radical are to be dropped. 

li Also, ambassador. ^ 

1" Upon adding this suffix, the last tioo letters of the radical are to be dropped 

** This word is from Epicurus, the name of an ancient philosopher, who is saul 
to have taught, that all happiness lies in the free induigence of sensual appetites. 

tt The &tbled god of the healing art. 



JLNALYtlCAL HAlttrAfi. 



M 



Esplanade 
Estimate ed 
Estivate ed 
Estovers 



Etesian 

Etiquettef 

Etyinon 

Euctical 

Examen 

Exchequer 



The open space mfronfofa ciiadd, 
jag ive or Rate ed ing ey 

ing al* Summer ed ing 

Necessaries allowed a tenant by law* 

EXEECISE 391. 

Perisdical; occurring €U staiediime$^ 
TheJormso/dviUiy. 
8 A primitive word. 

Supplicatory ; thanksgimng* 
et ation er able A test ; an inquiry, 

A court in England, having in chargu 
the public revenue; a treasury, 
ificatioD Example s 

External ; public* 

Exercise 392. 

Exotic Foreign; a foreign plant or tree. 

Extraneous Foreign ; not pertaining to a iMng* 

Extrinsic aUyal External ly 

Facinorous ness Tl^icJced in the extreme. 

Family ar|| arity arize arly A household ; a race. 

Funfaron ade Blusterer^ ing 

Farrier y A horse-shoer ; also, a horse-doctor^ 

Ferruginous Partaking cf iron* 



Exemplar! ary ariness ify 
Exoteric al 



ExE&cisE 393. 



Farthingale s 



Fastidi 

Fastigiate 

FaviDous 

February ' 

Fedity 

Felicity 

Felicitate 



ous o«isne!&8 oidty ously 
ed 



ous ously 
ed ing 



A hooj^ to spread the petticoat, 
y Aversion; disdain; disgust 
Boofed ; narrowed to the top^ 
Like ashes ; ashy. 
The second ntonui in the yean 
Baseness 

Bliss fill fully 

Congratulate ed ing ion 



Exercise 394. 



Femoral 
J«*eneratiGa 
Fenestral 
FerialJ atiou 

Ferocious ly ness 
Festuc ous inelT 



Belonging to the thigh. 

Usury 

Belon^ng to idndows. 

Pertaining to holydays. 

Fierce ly ness 

A straw* 



* Upon adding this suffix, thte last three letters of the radical are to be dropped 

t Also, etiquet. 

t Examine, is t6 make a test, search or inquiry. Note that the « of ezamen bei 

mes t in the derirativee. 

§ Upon addmg the suffixes, the last two letters of this word are to be dropped 

il FamUiaar, pertaining to a family) i. e. intimate% 

^ ThefQrm/e8tmcine,mg;td&eB9traw»eokred* 



»00 



ANAI.YTICAL MANUAL. 



JPV aoeoTuamentamentoTis 

I^bnbriate ed ing 



A ikread; a fibre. 
Fringe ed ing 



Fiftnla* ar ons ate 

Flagellate ed ing 

Flageletf a 

Flagitious ly ness 

Fluctuate ed ing ion 
Flununery 
Forinsecal 

Formidable ness ly§ 



Fornicate ed ion or 

Fortuitous ly ness 

FraUm al 

Friable ity 

FiicaaKe ed 

Frivolous ly 



ity ize 

ing 

ness ityt 



ExxBCiSE 395. 

ated A reed ; a pipe ; an andL dUease. 

Flog ed ing 

A mail flute. 

Atrocious ly ness 
antt Undulate ed ing ion axyt 

A sort of jelly ; ftdsome flattery. 

Foreign ; alien. 

Dreadful ness ly 

Exercise 396. 

ing To commit lewdness. 

Accidental ly- ness 
ization Brotherly hood 

Easy to he crumbled. 

To dress infncassee.\\ 



Frument aceous arious ation^T y IT 
Fruticous 



Trifling ly 
Com, or gram. 
Shrubby 



Exercise 397. 



Ful|^ate ed ing ion 
Fuliginous osityfly 
Fuudament al aXk 

Funcr al 

Fustigate ed 

Gabardine a 
Galaxy 



ed 



nag 



ing 



Galeated 



Gallimatia 
Gallimaufiry es 
Galloway s 
Galvanism istt 



ict 



Gkffgarism 
Garrison 



izedt 
ed ing 



Flash 
Sooty 

Foundation ; the lower part of the body 
ate atioQ Burial 

Cudgel ed ing 

A coarse upper garment. 

The milky way ; alsot any spUndid 

assemblage. 
Helmeted 

Exercise 398. 

Nonsense 

A hotch-potch ; a medley. 

A horse of small size, bredin QaUaway. 
izet izedt A species of electricity, d%»covfired Sy 

Galpani.. 
iadngt Gargle ed ing 

A fortress ; to put troops in a fortress. 



* "Drop the final letter of this word, upon adding the soffixes. 

t AJbn, flageolet. 

X Drop the last three letters of the radical, upon adding this suflSz. 

SHere drop the last tvyo ietten of the radical See Rule XIY; 
A fricassee is an article of food, made by cutting up chickens, rabbitSi or ths 



like, and dressing them in strong sauce. 

T Frumentation, a giving out, L e. largess, of 
utfale of food made of wheat boiled in nuUk. 



gram to the people : — Fmnieitf y, aa 



AHALTTICAL KJLXUAL. 



lei 



Ganrolons itv* 
Gasconade ed 



Talkative 

lag AnoUd trait of the OateonSf i. «• 

ing ; to boast. 

ExxRCiSE 399. 



Geneva 

Geniculate 

Germmate 

Gigantic 

Glad 

Oladi 

Gondola 

Gordian 



ed ing km 

ed ing ion ant* 

al eanf inef 

0118 al ate ation 

atort atorialatet 

ierf 



A distilled miritttous liquor ; gm> 

To joint, or Knot 

To sprout ; to bud» 

Pertaining to a giant ; immente. 

Ice y 

A siDord* 

A fiat-hottomed hoot used at Vtmxst^ 

Pertaining to Gordius,^ u e. intricate* 



ExERCiss 400. 



Grossamer 

Gramineal 

Gridiron 

Grimalkin 

Guaranty!! 

Gubemate 

Guillotinelf 

Gymnasinm tic* 



onsf 

8 

ed 
ed 
ed 



ing 
ive 
ing 
tics* 



orial 



tically* 



The dchm of plants ; a very thin colh 

web. 
Grassy 

A sort of grate for braiUngfish crfieikt 
An old cat. 

Warrant ed ing ^ 
Qoyem ed in^ ment menta) 

A machine for beheading ; to behead* 
Aplajcefor athletic exercises f 



EXZECISE 401. 



Haberdasher 

Habergeon 

Halibut 

HaUelujah 

Hallucinate 

Harbinger 

Harlequin 

Harmony 

Hebdomad 

Hebete 

Hecatomb 

Heder 

Hegemonic 

Hegira 



Id ing 

8 

8 ed 
ously ical 


ion 
ize ist 


8 . al 
ate ated 


wry 
ationude 



8 

al 
al 



One who deals in smaU wares* 

Armor to defend the neek and hrtatt* 

The name of a large fiat fish. 

A song of praise and thanksgiving. 

To Uunder ; to err. 

Forerunner s 

A buffoon ; to play the buffoon* 

Concord antly ant 

USE 402« 
Week 8 ly 

Dull; blunt, 

A sacrifice of a hundred oxen. 
Ivy ^ ed- 
Ruling 

Tlie era of Mohammed? s flight from 
Mecca.** 



* Drop the last three letleiB of the radical, upon adding this suffix. 

t ^pon adding this suffix, drop the last two letters of the radical. Drop, also, the 
final a of gondola, before the suffix. 

X Oladiator, a sword-player : a fencer. The ancient gladiatoni were men, who 
engaged in brutii) combats for public entertainment : — glaSiate, signifies, riiaped lik« 
aswoid. 

^ GokUos, an ancient }daf of Fhr3rgia, made a knot in the harness of his chailst^ 
so mtrioate, that an Oracle, it is said, promised the empire of Asia to him, that oovM 
«Btiait H Also,ruar««fM. 

f This maahiiiadaihnea Sa name ftom^iat of telvniBk^ ^'^\iif«|\%^^\>.^ 



IW 



'AHAtmCAt MAStja,. 



HeDebofe 
Hepatic 


ina* 
•1 


The name of certain jpi0nif* 
PerUdning to the Hocr. 

£URGI8X 403. 


Her«py ticf ticalf ticallyf 

Hermeneatie al ally icsf Interpreting ; expUmatory* 

Hermetic al fd)y Chemcal ; perfectly close or tigfU 

Hiatnaf ionf A^ap; an opening. 

Btbem al ate ated ation Wmter y ed ing 

Hibemia ant dsmt Ireland 

Hol^BMiGa » Apparition ; a spectre* 






ExKEeiss 404. 


Hodiernal 

HolydayJ 

Homily 

Hurricane 

Hyacinth 

^ena 

Hy^kn 

Hypnotic 


es istt 

8 

ine 

• 


Of, or pertaining tOi this day^ 
A festal day; adayofresU 
eticaljetict Sermon s izer 

A violent storm ofmnd, 

A genus of plants ; alsOf a gem^ 

A fierce quadrvmed. 

Hialthv 

Somninc 

ExsBCUK 405* 


HystOTical 

lambntll 

Idiom 

Idiot 

Imagine 

ImbecOe 

Imbricate 

Imitate 


ic ical Nervous fits peculiar to ioomeiu 

icIT icsif A poetic foot 

atic atical atically Peculiar mode of expression. 

ish ical ically iam** Fool ish isWy 

ed ing er able Conceive ed ing er able^ 

ity itate itated Weak ne«8 en ened 

ed ion Formed Uke a guUer-tUe ; tiled. 

ed ing or ion Copy ed ing ist 






Exercise 406. 


Impamiel 
Inchoate 


ed ing 
ly ed 


8 Enroll ed ing s 
ion ive Begun ; also, to begin. 



* Helleboriam, a medical preparation of hellebore. 
• t Befiore adding the toffixeg, drop the last two letters of this word. 

t The last letter of the radical is to be omitted, before adding thie termmatkm. 

4 ALio, hoUday, 

n Drop the last two letten of this word, upon adding the suffixes. 
, f An Iambus, or Iambic, consists of one short and one long syllable. Iambics^ 
(the plural,) are veises composed of short and long syllables in alternate snooeflBisB. 

** The form idiotism is sometimes used to signtfy a jteeuliarityof txpremisnt 
i a., an idiom ^— ecmietunea, msntat weakness, i. e. folly ; idiocy. To explahi thisy 
we haT6 only to recollect, that idiot and idiom are both fit)m the Greek liioi ; [idim\ 
fftgsr; peadiarfjrivmte. ISist [tiimms] was q>plied to a private penoa, as op- 
)jpi4 to one m office or otherwise publicly engaged ; thence, naturally enoofffa, te 
en^.inssperienesdt or ignorant of business affiurs ; and, finally, to a simple, si&ff m 



JkNALTTICAL KAlfUAL. 



K» 



ne 

Inimical . 
Instaurate 
Instigate 
Insulate 



Integer 

ftitenerate 

Interest 

Interim 

Internal 

Interpret 

Intestine 

Intimate 



Intrinsic 
Inveigle 
Irascible 
Irony 

Irritate 
Isagogic 
ItaHc 
Itinerate 



Ivory 

Jacobin IT 
• Janitor 
Janizary 
January 
Jehovah 
Jubilee** 
Juffular 



ous 



ed in§ ioin 
ed ing ion 
ed ing ion 



al ity ant 

ed ing ion 

ed ing 

ed mg er 

8 al 

ed ing cy 



A natkie of a place* 

Hostile . , 

or Reform ed ing ation er 
or Incite ed ing ment er 

or* Isolate ed ing ion 

Exercise 407. 

ate Whole; entire* 

To make tender. 

Concern ed ing 

The mean time. 

Interior ly 
ation Explain ed ing er atioBf 

Inward s ly 
ly To hint; also, familiar. 

Exercise 408. 



al ally Internal ; also, real ; inherent. 

ed ing ment er Entice ed ing ment er 

ness ity Irritable ness ity 

A mode of speech, in which tduzt 'is 
said, is the opposite of what is meant* 
ed ing ion ary Provoke ed ing ationj ativet 
al Introdnx5tory 

ise§ ised ising s Italian; also, a hind of letter, or tigpe. 
ed ing ant|| ary|| Journey ed ing 

Exercise 409. 

The tuslc of an elephant. 

A violent revolutionist, 

A door-keeper. 

One of a body of Turkish foot-guarit, 

Thejirst month of the year* 

The Supreme Being ; God. 

A rejoicing, or time of rejoicing. 

Pertaining to the throat. 



ize ized ism 



8 

es 



ant ation 



* Insulator is chiefly applied to a substance tliat prevents the communication si 
the electric fluid, i. e. a non-conductor. 

t Written, explanation. 

X The A; in provoke is changed mto c, m this word. 

§ Italicise is to print iu italics, — a sort of inclining letters first used in Italy. 

|] Upon adding this tenninatibn, drop the last three letters of the radicali 

IT The Jacobins are said to have been so named, from their place of meeting, 
which was a monastery of the monks called Jacobines, that it, friaiB of the ader St 
the Dominicans. 

** The great Jubilee, hi commemoration of the wonderftd delhreranee fttim the 
oppressions of Egypt* was celebrated among the Jews every fiftieth year. This yibu 
brought a general release of all debtonh slaves, and even of lands and other posses* 
sions whicn, by sale or otherwise, had passed out of the hands of the orighud fSM- 
Reject the ee» vpon adding the suffixes. 



104 



jUIALTTICAL HANUAL. 



Kilderkin 

Labial 

Labyrinth 

Lamrym 

Lacomct 

Lamina§ 

Lancinate 

Lascivious 



ate* ated* 
ian 8 

ary able al 
al ally ism 
able ar ate 
ed ing ion 
ly ness 



EzsftCiSE 410. 

A small harreL 
Pertaining to the Up»> 
Maze y s 

atoryf Tear nil 

Concise ly nesi 

ated A thin plate, or scale* 
Lacerate ed ing 
Wanton ly 



101 



Lassitude 

Lateritions 

Latitant 

Landannm 

Laureate 

Legacy 

Lefferdei 



cy ation| 

ed ing ionlf 

es atorll atee|| 

Legerdemain 

Legitimate ly cy ion 



Leviathan 

lieviffate 

Libiiunous 

Library 

Licentiate 

Licentions 

Lieutenant 

Lipintnde 

Litany 

Litigate 

Litur|ay»» 

Liziviumff 

Loricate 

Lucubrate 

Lumbago§ 

Luxury 

Macaroni 
Macerate 



ed ing ion 

ly ness ist|| 

an 

s 

ly ness 

8 cy ship 



es 

ed ing ion 

es ic ical 

al ons ate 

ed ing ion 

ed ing ion 

inous 

ous ousnessate 



EXXECISE 411. 

Weariness 

Having the nature of brickft 

I^f^g hid, trr concealed* 

l\nctwe ofopiwn. 

Laureled ; also, to crown witft laurel 
ataryll Bequest s 

Slight of hand; trick. 
ness Lawful ly ness 

Exercise 412. 

An immense iDater animal. 

To polish; also, to pulverize. 

Lewd ly ness 

A coUecHon of books ; place for hotikB, 

One who is licensed. 

Dissolute ly ness 

A deputy ; one next, or second in raank» 

Blearedness; soreness of eyes. 

Exercise 413. 

A form of prayer for public toorsfdp. 
iousjl To contest in taw. 

A formtUary of public prayers. • 

Lye 

To plate over. 

To study or compose by candle4igkt» 

A pain m the loins and back. 

Voluptiumsness ; a dainty. 



auon 



ory 



ed ing ion 



antn 
Exercise 414. 

A kind of edible paste ; a droll ; a fop. 

To make lean. 



*• Lahiote signifies Upped, or lip«like ; as, a labiate corol, in Botany. Befinre add« 
ing ate and ated, drop the suffix al of labial. 

t Lachrymatory, a veasel designed for the preservation dftean. 

t The inhabitants of ancient Laoonia cukivated brevity of speech with so great art» - 
siduity, that the term, laconic, came forcibly to signify concise, pithy, pointed, 

4 I>rq> the last letter of this word, upon addmg the suffixes. 

I Upon adding this termination, drop the last three letten of the radical. 

T Laureation is applied to the act <^ ooafening Univerrity degrees. 

•• See Note to Rule XI. 

tt Drop the last two letten of this wadt iqpon adding the suffixes. 



AliALYTICAL MANUAL. 



IM 



Maclimata 


ed 


ing ion 


or ContriYe ed ing anceer 


Madrigal 
IVffiginmafl 


8 




A little pastoral poem. 

A store-kouse ; a repository. 


Magister 


ial 


Ate* atie 


acy A master. 


Magnesiaf 


an 




A vMte alkaline earth. 


Mahogany 






A very hard and heauHful wood. 
Exercise 416. 


Mohammedt 
Majesty! 


an 
ic 


anize anism A celebrated false prophet of Arabia. 
ical ically Grandeur "^ 


Malady 


es 




Disease s 


Malapert 


ly 


ness 


Saucy ly , ness 


Malison 


8 




Malediction s 


Malleate 


ed 


ing ion 


ablell To hammer out. 


Mandarin 


s 






Mandible 


8 


arir 


The jaw. 
EXEECISE 416. 


Mandncate 


ed 


ing ion 


ory Masticate ed ing vm orj 


Mania 


act 


acal 


Madness 


Manifest 


ed 


ing ly 


ness Clear ed ing ly ness 


Manoeuvre 


ed 


ing 


Manage ed ing 


Mantiger 


8 




A lady*s goum, or dress. 


Mantna 






Marasmus 






AwasdngawayofOufiesh; otropAgft 


Margarite 






Pearl 


• 






ExxECiSE 417. 


Marital 






Relating to a husband. 

The ptUp of quinces boiled wUh sugar. 

A little monkey. 


Marmalade 
Marmoset 


8 




Martin^al 
Masculine 


8 


ness 


Curb-strap fastened to a horsed girth. 
Male ;. atso^ strong ; robust. 


Masquerade** 


»8 


ed ing 


An assembly of persons masked. 


Massacre 


8 


ed ing 


Murder s ed ing 


Matliematicsf 


al 


ally ian 


The science of quantity'. . 



* In adding ats, atiCf and acy, Rule XIII. applies. The fiam magistrats, deaig- 
natee an officer inverted with executive or judicial powexs. 

t Drop the last letter of this word in forming the derivative. 

t Mohammed, or, as the name is commonly written, Mahomst, oommeneed bis 
wonderful career of imposture in the early part of the seventh century. He posNd 
for a prophet, honored of Heaven with extraordinary revelations to mankind ; and> 
partly by artifice, but chiefly by force, succeeded in establishmg a sort of moiwMl 
system of belief and practice, — Pagan, Jewish and Christian, which, to this &j, 
lirams the religion of a great part of the eastern worid. 

§ See Note to Rule XL 

jl Drop the lart three letters of the radieal, upon adding this terminatioii. 

T Written, mandibular. 

** Masquerade, as a v«Eb» is to assemble ki masks ; to go in di^giusa. 

14 



va 



AKALTTKAL XAITOAL. 











£xBiu:lBE 416. 


MatQtine 


al 






Pertaining to the morning ; early. 


Matriculate 


ed 


ing 


ion 


To enroll; to admit to membership.. 


Manaoletim* 


' 8 


an 




Monument s al 


Maxillar 


y 






Pertaining to the jaw. 


Maximum 








The greatest amount. 


Meanderf 


s 


ed 


ing 


ian A winding course ; to wind. 


Mechan 


ist 


ism 


ic 


icst A machine ; an engine. 


Mediocre 


ity 


al 


ist 


Middling ; middle rate. 

EXKBCISE 419. 


MeduUar 


y , 






Pertaining to, or consisting ofmarrom 


Meliar 


ated 


I ating aticmity Better ed ing ment nesa 


Mendacious 


ty§ 






Lying : false. 




8 


cy 


ity§ ate§ Beggar ' s y 


Mephitic 


al 






Fold; noxious* 


Mercenary 


S' 


ness 


es 


Venal ; hired ; also, a hireling. 


Mercuryg 


alist 


fyl ficationll One of the ancient gods ; a planet . 
quicksilver. 


MIU 


iaf atef 


ant 


axy A soldier. 










Exercise 420. 


Millesimal 








The thmisandik. 


Miniate 


8 


ed 


ittg 


me** To color or tinge with vermilion. 










The smallest amount. 


Mintdar 


8 






Balcony es 


Mitigate 


ed 


ing 


ion 


ive Soften ed ing 


Moiety 


es 






Half es 


Molasses 








Tfeacie 


Morocco 








A fine kind of leather. 



• Artemisia, wife of Mauaolos, an ancient king of Caria, whose death had rea- 
dared her extremely disconsolate, erected, iu honor of her husband, one of the noblest 
monimients oT antiquity. The monument was called Mausoleum, — a name ever 
since applied to ai»r splendid sepulchral structure. 

t This wotd is mnn MtBdnder, an ancient river of Asia Minor, remarkable far its 
intricate turns and windings. 

X Mechanics, the science of motion, ot of moving forces ; literally, the science of 
machines. 

§ Drop the last three letters of the radical, upon addmg this suffix. 

jl The leading ofl(ee of Meieiiry, though many and various he had, was tiiat of 
messenger of the other gods. He is usual^ represented as havmg a winged eap [pe. 
tasusi and whiged sandals, [talaria,} with which he could perfomi their errsnids with 
the greatest celerity. Hence the apfriication of his name to the metal quieksilwr, 
4a allusion to its wlatiliiy ;-^to one of the planets, because of its speed ; — and to 
sprightly qualities, as belonghig to one bom' under the influence of that piaasft 
Msreurify is to obtain mercury from metallic minerals : mercwifiedtisn, the act of 
mhdng with quicksilver. 

T The form militia^ literally s^fies soldiery^ but is now restrieted to bodise ef 
men, enrolled, and tramed m military movements, though not brongfat into actual 
service in war, except in cases of emergeney. Militate is, to serve as a soldier, i. e 
to fight ; to war ; to oppose. 

•* JftsMliirs, • MDflJl paintiaf tr delfaieatioB ; a oiMn poitntt. 



ANALYTICAL BIAlfTTAL. IW 

ExnteiSE 421. ' 

Mosqxdto* et A kind of stinging Jlyt er gnat. 

Mountebdnk 8 ery Quack s ery 

Miilatto 68 One whose parents are a tokite and 

black. 

Mulberry The fruit of a tree of the genus marut* 

Mtdiebnty Womanhood. 

Muriaf atejated atic Strong brine, or pickle. 

Mussulmans ish Mohammedan s 

Mutilate ed ing ion or To cut off; to cut short ; to maim. 

" ExjERCisE 422. 
Myriad , s The number often thousand. 

Myrmidon§ s A rude soldier ; a desperate ruffian* 

Mystery ous ously ousness es A secret ,• something hidden. 
Narcotic al ally ness Torporific al ally 

Nauseaf ate ated ous ousness Sickness at the stomach ; loaOiing. 

Necessary ly ityH itate|| itous|| That must be ; indispensable. 

Negotiate ed ing able|[ ant|] To transact business ; to treat inth* 
Nemorous alj Woody 

Exercise 423. 

Nepotismlf Favoritism to relatives. 

No&tion Unwillingness 

November The eleventh month. of the year* 

Novenary es The number nine. 

Novercal Pertaining to a step-mother. 

Nugacity ious|| The quality of being trifling ; futility 

Numismatics The science of coins and rnidals. 

Nummary ular|| Pertaining to coin or money. 

EXEACISE 424. 
Nundinary al|| atian|| Pertaining to a fair, or market dw. 

Obelisk A square stone, gradually diminishing 

from the base to the summit. 
Oblivion iouslj Forgetfulness 

October T%e tenth m4mth of the year. 

Opium** ateft The inspissated juice of poppies. 

* Also written musqueto, musketoe, and moseheto, 

t Drop the final letter of this word, upon adding the suffixes. 

t Muriate is the name a][^Ued to a salt formed by muriatic acid combined with a 



§ The Myrmidons, a people of ancient Thessaly, derived their name, accordinf to 
nome, from Myrmidon, their sovereign ; according to others, from a Greek word 
[uvpitriKeg] signifying ants : thQ fabulous account of them being, that they were origi- 
nally ants, and were changed by Jupiter into men. They acccHnpanied Achilles ta 
the Trojan war, and were daruig and niesperate in action. Hence the applkatimi 
of their name to all persons of like character. 

li Upon adding this termination, drop the last three letters of the radical 

T Nepotism, nom the Latin nepoa, which generally signifies a nephew, is used la 
reference to the corrupt promotion of any relative. 

** The last two letters of this word must be dropped, npon adding the suffixes. 

ft Opiate, made of, or having the quality of opiom ; abo, a soponfic meficine 



)08 



▲NALTTICAL MANUAL. 



OpHm 


]8in*iBt 


acy* 


Th$he8t. 


Opulent 


ce 


ly 






Rich es ly 


Orbity 


ude 


ationf 






State of hdng bereaved vf paremU m 
ckUaren. 










£XERCI8E 425. 


Orchestra} 


8 








A place for musicians ; a hand ofnw 
sicians. 


Orion 










A southern constellation. 


Orrery! 


es 








An instrument to show the moHons oj 
the planets. 


Oscillate 


ed 


ing 


ion 


ory 


To move backwards and forwards. 


Oscitate 


ed 


ing 


antf 


ion 


Yawn ed ing 


Ostracizell 


ed 


ing 


iamf itef 


To banish ; to expeL 


Pabnlumf 


ar 


ous 


ation 


Food; aliment. . 


Palanquin 










A covered carriage, borne on menU 
shoulders. 










ExE&cisx 426. 


Palaver 










Idle talk ; flattery. 


Palestralir 


ic 


ical 


ian 






Palladium** 








A statue of Minerva ; a defense. 


Palliate 


ed 


ing 


ion 


ive 


To cloaJc, or cover ; to extenuate. 


Palpable 


ness 


^y 


ity 




That may be felt ; plain ; obvious. 


Palpitate 


ed 


ing 


um 




To beat, or throb ; to flutter. 


Pantaloon 










A garment for males ; a buffoon. 


Papaverous 










Having the nature, or quaUt^ of poppy. 










EXKBCISE 427. 


Paragon 


8 








Pattern s 


Parasang 


8 








A Persian measure of length. 


Paregoric 










Assuaging; amedicine that eases patn. 
A beadle ; a summcner of civil eowrU 


Paritor 


8 









* Optimism, the doctrine that all things are ordered for the belt : optimacy, the 
nobility, or body of the nobles. 

t Drop the last three letters of the radical, upon adding this suffix. 

t Also written orchestre, 

§ This contrivance was so named in honor of the Eari of Orrery. 

Q Among the ancient Athenians, persons deemed dangerous to the state, were 
condemned to exile in the manner following. Each person inscribed upon a shell 
[ovrpoKov, ostracon] tbe name of the person, whom it was his wish to banish. If, 
upon counting the votes given, the name of the same individual appeared upon a 
minority of SOOO shells, that person was sentenced to banishment for ten years. 
Hence we have the forms ostracixe and ostracism, which latter signifies the act of 
banishing m the manner just described. Ostraeite, is applied to an oyster sheli in 
the fossil state. 

T The last two letters of this word must be dropped, upon adding the suffixes. 

** ^ladium is from Paiia«, one of the names of Minerva. This celebrated statue, 
about which so many wonders have been related, was destined, it was said, as long 
as preserved, to be a sure source of safdty to ancient Troy. Palladium has, heneis 
come to be applied to any thing. Upon the preservation of which, the safety of an- 
other thmg depends. 



ANALYTICAL VA2CUAL. 



100 



Parsimony 
Paucity 
Pavilion s 

Pectinal* ated 



0118 onsness 



I^eculiar 

I^eculate 

I^ecuniary 

i^enetrate 

I*enury 

Petronel 

Petulant 

Pharisee* 



ed 

OTIS 



aict 



oQsly Sparingness in use or expeHdUmrt* 
Fewness 

ed Tent s ed 

atioQ Pertaining to, or like a comb, 

ExEBCiSE 428. 
ize ly ness Belonging to one aUme ; apprppriaU* 

ing ion or To d^rcmd the public. 
Monetary 

ive antf ablef Pierce ed 

ously ousness Poverty 

A horseman^s pistol. 
Peevish ness ly 



aicalness aism One of an ancient Jetmsfi sect. 



Pharmacy aceuticf 



Phillipic§ 


ize 


ized 


izing 


Phthisis* 


ic 


ical 




Phylacterll 


ic 


ical 


ed 


Picaroon 


s 






Pilaster 


8 






Pillorj' 


es 


ed 


ing 


PimentalT 








\ 






JE 


Pinnacle 


8 


ed 




Pioneer 


8 






Placable 


ness 


ity 




Plagiary 


ist 


ism 




Platonic* 


ist 


>ism 


ize 


Plebeian 


8 






Pleurisy* 


tic 


tical 




Pneumatics 


icf 


icalf 


T? 


Podagrical 






Ji 


Polemic 


al 







Exercise 429. 

The art of preparing substances for 

medicine, 
A discourse containing bitter invective. 
Consumption 

Amulet ; a charm against evil. 
Plunderer s 

A small square cQ(hm,n, or pillar, 
A machine to punish criminals, having 

holes for the head and hands, 
A hind of spice ; Jamaica pepper. 

Exercise 430. 

Turret s ed 

One that goes before to dear the way. 
Appeasable ness 
Literary theft ; a thief in literature, 
ized Relaiina to Plato ; purely inteUectuaL 
One of me common people. 
InfiamnMtion of the pleura,** 
Science of air {also, doctrine of sptriU. 

Exercise 431. 

Gouty 
Controversial 



* Dn^ the last two letters of this word, upon adding the suffixes. 

t Upon adding this suffix, drop the last three letteis of the radioal. 

X Pharisaic, pertaining to the Pharisees, ». e. formal ; hypocritical. The Phari- 
sees were a sect remarkably strict in ceremonial observances, and of very lofty pre- 
tensions to holiness. 

§ This word, first applied to certain orations of Demosthenes against Phillip, king 
of Macedon, came afterwards to be a general epithet for any bitter, acrimonious 
piece of invective. Drop the final letters ic, upon adding the suffixes. 

II Also, phylactery. Among the Jews, the phylactery was a slip, or bandage of 
parchment, with some memorable passage of Scripture inscribed, which was won 
on the forehead, neck or breast, as an indication of religious character. 

T Also written pimento. 

** The pleura is a thin membrane linmg the thorax, or chest 



110 



AHALtTICAL KAHCTAL. 



Polfioitatkm 

Pollinctor 

Pamander 
Pomatum 
Pragmatic 
•Prodigal . 



Prodigy 

Propagate 

Provender 

Prunello 

Puberty 

Puerile 

Pulchritude 

Pyramid 



8 ed 
al ally 
ity ly 



mg 
alness 



ist* 



Pitwnise 

One that prepares dead bodies for 5#* 

rial or embalming. 
A ball of powder perfumed ; noeethaSL 
Perfumed ointment for the hair. 
Meddlesome ; qffidous. 
Wasteful neas ly 



ExEKCiSE 432. 



ous ously ousnesses Any thing astonishing or monstrous* 
ed ing ion ablef To spreads o^ extend. 

Food for beasts. 

A kind of silk stuff. 

Ripe age in mankind. 
ity Chiklish ness 

Beauty 
al ical ically oid A solid having a square^ triangular or 
polygonal oase^ and ending in a 
vertex. 



ExE&ciSE 433. 



Quantity ative itive 
Querimonioua ly ness 
Quinary 

Quirister s 

Quixotic ism* 

/ 

Quotidian s 

Rabato s 

Ridotto s 



Amount; bulk; weight. 

Querulous ; complaining. 

Consisting of five. 

Chorister s 

Like Don Quixote, i. e. absurdly ro^ 

mantic. 
Daily ; any thing occurring daily. 
A neckband. 
An assembly ; a musical entertainmenU 



Uodomant 

Kuminate 

Runagate 

Sacharine 

Sacerdotal 

Sadduceet 

Sagamore 

Saginate 



Sagitt 
Salamander 



Exercise 434. 

ade A braggart ; a ranter. 

ed ing ion antf l^o chew over again ; to meditate* 

8 A fugitive ; a renegade. 

Sugary 

Priestly 

ism* One of an ancient Jewish sect* 

* An Indian cHief 

Fatten 

' Exercise 435. 

ate§ arius§ An arrow. 

A kind^ of lizard fabled to live in fire* 



ed 



al 



mg 



^ry 
ine 



* Drop the last tuio letters of the radical, before adding this suffix. 

t Drop the last three letters of the radleal, upon adding this suffix. 

X The Sadducees denied the doctrine of the resurrection and of angelic existence 
They were a sort of freethinkers. 

^ Sagittate, formed like the head of an. arrow: — Sagittarius, [the archer,] th* 
name of one of the signs of the Zodiac. 



ANALYTICAL MANUAIr. 



Ill 



SaHva* al 

Salubrious ly 

iSalvable 

^Sanhedrim 

Sardonic! 

Satellite 



Scrutiny* 

September 

Sepulchre 

Sequester 

Seraglio 

Seraskier 

Serenade 

Shibboleth 



Sibilant 
Sillabub 



ity 



Satumianll inej 

Savanna 

Scaramouch 

Scavenger 

Scholium fl" 

Scimitar** 

Scintillate 

Scrofula* 



s 
ed 



sry 0U8 atef Spittle 

ty} Healthful ly ness " 

That may be saved. 
The supreme council among the Jew9» 
Forced ; feigned ; involuntary. 

ious A follower; a secondary planet. 

Exercise 436. 

aliant Relating to Saturn ; golden ; happy. 

An extensive open plam ; prairie. 

A buffoon in motley dress. 

One who cleans the streets. 

A comment ; etplanaUrru remark. 

A short sword used by the Turks. 
ing km antt Sparkle ed rag 

T'he disease^ commonly caUed king'0 
evil. 



Exercise 437. « 

ize ized ous eer Search ed ing er 

The ninth month of the year. 
ing Orave ; tomb ; to bury. 

ation able To imthdraw ; to separate. 

Palace of the Turkish Sultan ; harem* 
A Turkish general, 
ing An entertainment of music at night in 

open air. 
The characteristic^ or criterion of a 
party. 



*al 
ed 
s 

8 



ed 
ate 



ed 



Exercise 438. 



ationi 



Hissing 

A liquor made of wine or cider mixed 
mih ndlk. 



* The last letter of this word is to be dropped, before adding the suffixes. 

t Salivate is, to excite chiefly by mercurial preparations, extraordinary discharges 
of saliva ; to purge by salivai^ discharges. 

t Drop the last three letters of the radical, before adding this termination. 

§ Among the products of ancient Sardinia, was a specfes of wild parsley, or other 
herb much resembling it, which proved mortal to every one that ate of it ; causing 
its victim to have such contractions of the nerves, such invofuntqry motions of th0 
muscles, as to appear to he in a fit of laughter in the very moment of death Hence, 
the phrase, Sardonic grin^ or smile. 

[| Satymiarif in reference to the blissful reign of Saturn, ofl^n styled the golden 
age, ^ame, hence, to signify, happy : — Saturnine, because, according to the astrolo- 
gers, persons bom under that planet are distinguished for a grave, demure turn of 
mind, is applied to what is, sad; dull; heavy : Satumalian, from Saturnalia, th« 
feasts of Saturn, which were characterized by licentiousness and riot, has, accord- 
mgly, the meaning, loose; dissolute; licentious. 

T Also, schoUon. Plural, scholia. 

•* Alsor, scymitar and eimeter. 



in 



ANALYTICAL MANt7AL. 



Simony* 

Sinister 
Sirocco 
Skeleton 

Solecismf 
Solicit 



Sovereign 
Spatula 

Sphacelus§ 

Stiletto 

Stipulate 

Subsidy 

Succulent 

Safibcate 



The buying or selling of chMrch jprc- 
ferment, 
ly 0118 ously On the left; evU ; inauspicious. 

A pernicious periodical wind in Italy. 
The bones of an animal, cleaned^ and 
preserved in their natural position. 
izet An impropriety in language. 

0U8 ation Entreat ed ing y 



istt 
ed 



istict 
ing 



Exercise 439. 



ty iae ized ly 



ate 

8 

ed 
es 
ce 
ed 



ated ating 

ing ion 
ary 



.ing 



ive 



A supreme ruler. 

An utensil used by apothecanet to 

spread plasters. 
Gangrene ate ated ating 
A small dagger. 
To settle terms ; to contract. 
Aid in money ; a supply. 
Juicy ness 

Choke ed ing 



Superable 

Surgeonjl ery$ icalj 

Tafferel 

Taffeta 

Tantalizelf ed 

Tantamount 

Termagant cy 

Tesselate ed 



ing 



Tesseraic 
Testaceous 
Testudo** 
Theorem 



inal 



Exercise 440. 

That may be overcome* 
One that cures by manual operations. 
The upper part of a ship's stem. 
A glossy thin silk. 
ation To torment with disappointments. 
Equivalent 

Turbulent ; a boisterous woman. 
Toformy or lay in squares ; to checker. 

Exercise 441. 

Being in squares ; tesselated. 

Pertaining to shells ; having a shdU 
ineousf t inatedf f Tortoise 
atic atical A proposition to be proved. 



ing 



• Simony, literally, the act, or practice of Simon, who o^red to buy with money, 
from the Apostles, the gift of the Holy Ghost 

t The people of Sou, a town of Cilicia, originally founded by a colony of Athe- 
nians, had so degenerated from the pure dialect of the parent city, that every sort of 
impropriety or incongruity of language was proverbially styled a solecism, 

X Drop the last three letters of the radical, before adding this termination. ^ 

§ Upon adding the suffixes, drop the last two letters of this word. ^ 

jl A contraction of chirurgeon. 

T Tantalus, king of Lydia, according to an ancient fable, was condemned for his 
crimes to sufier, in the lower world, the miseries of perpetual hunger and thinrt 
Though boughs laden with delicious fruits hung directly over his head, and the water 
of the pool in which he was placed, came up to his very chin, both instantly receded* 
the moment he attempted to partake of them. Hence the word, tantalize, 

** Drop the last letter of this word, before adding the suffixes. 

ft Testudineous, having the form or nature of a tortoise shell : — Testudinatedg 
diaped like a tortoise shell, i. e. roofed, arched. 



AHALTTICAL KAKtrAL. 



118 



Theory* «tic etical iit ise A^eetdatUn ; a scheme or system. 

Theriac al Jn anUidoU. 

Tilillato ed ing ion Tickle ed ing 

'Tolamto ed ion ancef ablef Suffer ed ance able 

ExxRcus 442. 



TEVramameiit 
Traculent ce 
Tremendons Ij 
XJhitfiity ary aiineoa 
JJhanam 

Uimiilic al ate ated 
Ungrolate 
Vatidnate ed ing ion alf 



A mock combat or ene(»inter ; a Hit* 

Fierce; saoage* 

Terrible; ostomMug* 

Ommpreaence 

Muddy; sUmy. 

Pertaining to the navd. 

Hbof-ehc^pedm 

Propliesy ed ing 



ExsRCiSE 443. 



Venerate 


ed ing 


ion 


ablef Reverence ed ing 


Venial 


new 






Venison 






Flesh of beasts taken in ihe (hase ; 
dttr'sfiedu 


Vertebre 


al 




A joint of the spine. 


Veatibnle 


a 




Porcb 68 


Viminall 


eooB 




Pertaifdng to twigs. 


Violate 


ed ing 


ion 


ablef To injure / to break. 


Virulent 


ly ce 




Venonmts; malignant. 
ExxBCiSE 444. 



Vitriol ic ons ate izable^ mineral salt ; copperas. 

Vituperate ed ing ion ive Censure ed ing 

Voluntary ly neas 

Voluptuaiy ousf ouslyf ouanessf 

Wednesday a 

Whitsuntidel 

Zodiacll al 



Spontaneous ly 

Cfne given up to luxurious enjoyment. 
Thefourih day of the week. 
The season of Pentecost. 
A great circle in the heavens^ containr 
ing the twelve Signs. 



* Drq) the last letter of this word, before adding the suffixes. 

t Upon adding tiiis suffix, drop the last three letteis of the radical. 

t Upon adffing the suffixes, dxiip the last ftoo letten of this word. 

§ Compounded of the three words, white, Sunday and tide. The season of Pen- 
taeost was so named from the oircnmstanee, that the new converts in primitiTe thnos, 
a|^>eared at church, firom Eaiter to Pentecost, m white jg^annents. 

n Zodiac, from a Greek word, [^aStov, diminutive of ^aw,^ meaning an animal, 
mgna&as containing, or consisting of animals ; this great circle of (SmsteUations 
bSng so called, from their siqiposed resemblance to the figures of certain anhnals. 

15 



114 UXJLLTrKAL MJJXUAL. 

SECTION xvn. 

THE SIMPLE PREFIXES. 

Pbxfbct familiarity with the form and force of each of the pnfizea 
defined and illustrated in this Section, is absolutely necessary to the 
proper study of the extensive and important class of words, that oome 
next in order to be treated. The predominant signification, in each 
case, is indicated by a word in small capitals, while the o^ier defi- 
ning terms are, for &e sake of distinction, printed in itaUes, In every 
instance, no little care should be taken to point out, and fix upon tbi 
pupil's mind, this primary and prevailing power, whatever be uie par- 
ticular word or words employed to express it. Thus, in explaining 
Ah, which stands first in the list, and which is well enough defined or 
translated, in most cases, by such words as from, away, off, or apartf 
examples sufficient should be given and so explained, as to show that 
its everywhere prevalent force is to express separatum — the parting of 
one thing from another. 

Those prefixes which, besides their ordinary meanings, have certain 
special powers, or uses, and are thence classed as negative, privaUvef 
intensive or euphonic, will require particular care ; since wiUiout thi% 
there is great and constant liability to error. And as these terms 
must frequently occur in pursuing this study, and should, therefore^ 
be well understood^ the following definitions are given to be commit- 
ted by the pupil. 

DEFINITIONa 



A NEGATIVE PARTICLE is ouc that indicates or implies the denial or 
albaence of that which is expressed by the radical ; as, tflegal, not le- 
gal : ttfishapen, itithaut shape, or not shaped. 

n. 

A PRIVATIVE PARTICLE* is One that indicates the privation, or dis- 
possession of that which is denoted by the radical ; as, disELTm, 1o take 
out of the state of "being armed, i. e. to deprive of arms. 

HI. 

An INTENSIVE PARTICLE is ouc that serves to give additional foroe to 
the meaning of the word with which it is combined ; as, evasperate^ 
to make very, or exceedingly^ angry. 

* As the diBtinction between ne^tive and privative particles, is veiy likely to be 
misimdentood by youn||r pupils, care should be taken to make it plain. This is easily 
done by resort to examples. Thus, in <2iriike, which means I do mot like, we hav» 
dis plainly negative ; while m {lisarm, which means to deprive of arms, the samA 
particle has a privative power. 

t Notice, that Ex in exaeperatet which property means out, or out of, has not 



/ 



ANALmCAL KAIIVAL. 115 

IV. 

An supHoific PARTICLE 18 ooo that serves merely to produoe an 
^«greeable soimd ; as, ameliorate, for meliorate. ' 

The prefixes, like the suffixes, occasion by their unicHi with radi- 
cals, the necessity of certain euphonic changes ; which, though not 
made with that regularity, nor with that frequency observable in the 
cue of the latter, are, nevertheless, both regular and frequent enough 
to justify a statement of the circumstances under which they are found 
to take jplaoe. And, as in that ferm, they are most likely to arrest die 
schdars attention, they are here presented as 
t 

RULES 

FOB THE FORMATION OP DERIVATIVE WORDS BT MEANS OF PEBFCCBS. 

Rule I. 

The final vowel of a prefix is often omitted, befere a radical that 
. begins with a vowel ; as, anti-arctic, anterctic ; paro-ody, |Mirody.* 

Rttle II. 

The final consonant of a prefix, is generally assimilated to the ini- 
tial consonant of the radical ; as, eui-nex, annex ; su&-fix, suffix. 

Rtjle III. 

In some instances, the final consonant of a prefix, instead of being 
assimflated to the initial consonant of the radical, is rejected ; as, a^ 
vert, avert ; coii^regent, co-regent. 

Rule IV. " 

Between the prefix and the radical, is sometimes inserted a mere 
letter of union ; as, bj-ocular, binocular. 

In preparing his exercises, the pupil will have little, or no occasion 
to pake the chances which these rules prescribe ; since, to prevent 
embarrassment and mistake, they are, for the most part, already made 
fi>r him. This, however, should not release him irooi die duty of be- 
coming familiar with them^ and understcuiding their application. 

In diis and the next section, it will be noticed, that the radicah are 
not Separately defined, but explained in connection with the prefixes. 

hem its apprdpriate Bense, bat, serving merely to indicaie a higher degree of snger, ■ 
scooKliafly defined by the wind very, or exceedingly. In this book, intennve psr- 
licles are nnifonnly defined by sooh words as very, exceedingly, fuUyt ^koremgUyt 
mm^ieteUf. 

* When both yowels are retained, they are sometimes separated by the hyphaft 
crthedieresii; as, pg6»estabiidi, or praHstthtirfi 



116 



ANALYTICAL KAlTirAL. 



To determiae, in each instance, what part of the definition belongs to^ 
or is intended for the radical portion of the derivative, one has only to 
direct attention to those words not in Italics, and not inclosed in brack. 
et8. In many cases, the radical is deemed sufficiently simple without 
a defininff word ; accordingly, it appears in the definition, joined with 
that word, or those words only, that serve to explain the pxefiZr 



ExEaciSE 445. 



Ab* 

Abs 

A 

Adf 

Ac 

Af 

if 

An 
Ap 
Ar 
As 
At 
At 



AH 

Am 

Amb 

Ambi 
Amphi 

Ante 
Anti 
Ant 



raoM; away; off; apart. 



to; towards; at; 
on ; to make. 



near 



Abstndef 

Avert, 

Ad}6mf 

Accredit, 

-4/Hx, 

ul^elntinant, 8ti( 

; ^fmex, 
Append, 
Arrogm^ 
jl58imikte« 
AttreLCting, 
jitfcribe, 



toireefrom. 

to poah or thrust owayr 

to tnm away arfiem. 

to joiii to, 

to give credit to, 

tonx to. 

to, 
to bind'or tie to. 
to join to, 
to nang to. 

daiming to [one's miL] 
to makelikeorsiiiBlarto. 
drawing to or towards, 
to write or mark down to 
[one's acconnt.] 



ExsRCiSK 446. 



WHOLLY ; 

tirely. 



completely ; en" .il^-just, 
^ready^ 
^mpatate, 



entirely just. 
completely ready, 
to cat roind, and hence, 
tOCQt off! 

about; around; doubtful; ^^^^ «^ ^^^'^^ 

^^"^* -AwMlogy, doubtful talk or language^ 

jlmpUbioiu, havin^r, as it were* a dont- 
V hleuSe or nature. 

' BEFORS ; prenious ; in front. Antecedent, goine hefore, 
? AOAIN8T ; opposite; corres- jln^pathy, a feeing against, 
> pondent, ^in^arctic, opposite to the axetiie. 



* Thii paitiole, oerpeeiany the form a, is often ntgative or privative. 

t Notice here, that d, Ae final letter of ad, m nine times assimUated by Rule H. 
and once rtjeeted hy Rnle IIL ; makmg, m all, ten forms of this one paitidey be» 
■de the piimitiye one. 

t This ftrm of the piefiz ad, mnst not be coofiranded with the a above, which is 
ftom a&, and has^ accordingly, a meaning exactly (^posite. That paitida a, how- 
ever, which denotes prhration or negation, is in most instances, as the classical scholar 
will mstantly perceive, the Greek alpJta privative or negative, though here ranJked 
m a fonn of <i^ With this disthiction, however, the mere English scholar need not 
be tronhled; sbice ab, coBsdered as a nrivative, has precisely the same finee at the 
|rivative or negative alpha of the Greek. For a similar reason, the Saion piefti #» 
M not, in the text, distmgnished from a, the abridged form of ad, which ImmT ~'^ 
pv^position. 

f AI^ trfMB Boe aepanitad from tha ntdteal by a byj^MOr rqiKS^ 



AVALTTXCJU. HAin7Al. 



117 



Aph 



Be 
Bene 
Bi 
Gata 

Ci« 



ur; ogam; apart. 



fsom; off; away. 



EzEiunsE 447. 

.^Inadromous, 
jl^TOBtatize, 



nmninff, or pttMng im. 
to stand amiyfram, tnak 

is, tofixnake^ 
the taking [of an imtj al 

letter or syllable] yroM • 

[a word.] 
near, or by the side of. 
doinff well or good. 

ttlXh^\d. 



NCAB ; 6y ; over ; to makcBeside, 

WKLi; good. Beneficent, 

two; apart. JSifold, 

} AftAiNST ; down ; ill ; ac- CSotobaptist, one who is agmmt baptise 
$ cording to. Cat^lic, completely nmversal. 

Off THIS siDS. 0K5alp]ne, on this nde of the Alps. 



Ciicun 

CircQ 

Contra 

Contio 

CrOunter 

Con 

Co 

Com 

Cog 

Cd 

Cor 



ai^xund; about. 



ExEEcisE 448. 

C^rcttmflnent, flowing arottn^. 
CSrcKttion, the act ai gmng aroutuL 
Om^adict, to speak against^ or » 

^^^^^^l^^^'^^Oro^roveit, to'^Tjj^^i [in dis- 
^'^^^^ pute,] t. e. to at^ntU. 

CWnterpart, c^e^pondent part. 

Gmvoke, to call together. 
Cb-partner, 
Cbwimix, 

WITH ; wUhin; together; ^^S^^^^ 
joint; like; to make, e.nocntion, 



Owrival, 



a Joint partner. 

to mix together. 

bom to^emer ; hence, al- 
lied by blood. 

the act of speaking to- 
geiher. 

anvalunt^ [another,] i.e. 
iifeULow rivaL 



.Det 

Demi 
Dia 

Dicho 
Dist 

01 

DyB 



Exercise 449. 

»OM ; dovm; off; to caiMeDepart, 
or make. Dejected, 

HALF. . Demi-wolf, 

TBROueH \ thoroughly; to- Diameter, 
g€(htr. 

A^AKT ; in two parts. DichoUmazey 
Dutend, 
Disable, 
' apart; separately; aioay; 

not. Df/lident, 

^ J[>ilacerate, 

ill; bad; difficult. Dyspnoea, 



to "ptjtfrom. 

cast down. 

half-wolf. 

the measote [i. e. a ri^ 

line] throu^. 
to cnt in two. 
to stretch c^Mxrt. 
to take out of the state of 

being able. 
not trusting [one*s self.] 
to tear apart. 
<fi2/{cu{t breathing. 



• Here note ihat Cdth in eatMie is mer^y intensive, 
t De 18 not unfrequently a privatiye ; and occaflionally a mere intensiTe. 
X The moat common aie of Dig, is to expresi prtvaition or negatioo. la a km 
safes, however, it Is intensiye ; in fewer still, eniibMun. 



116 



ANALTTIGlIi MANITAIh 



ExxmcMB 450. 



X 
E« 

Zc 

Ef 
Extra 

Epi 

En 
Em 

En 



For 
Fore 



) 



out; pvlof; fnm; he- 



Jl&ceed, 



JE2bcentric, 
J^^Tudon, 



BSTOffD. 



ON.; vgpon ; ootr ; dwring.Epiacojpy, 



Hypo 
Im 

!P 

Ir 



Intro 
JattL 
Inter 

Enter 

Jnxta 

Male 

Mai 

Metaf 

Meth 



Mia 

NOQ 



Siir ; nUo ; toput^ or cause JT^loee, 
to he in, JBmbroil, 

wxLXi ; good; easy; agree-Eu^hoay, 
able. 

EXEBCIBS 451. 

AAAiirsT; off; aside* 
BEVOBi; htforehand. 

BAUP. 
VNBSB* 



tocaatou^ 

to go beyond* 

out of, or deyuitingy^VM^ 

the centre* 
the act of flowing out 
J&frovagant, wandering beyond [dot 

limita,] 
a lookin£ oner, t . c. 8upe^ 

intendence* 
to dose til* 

topUin a broil or tomolt. 
ogreea&^e aonnd* 



oybr; o^e. 



ur ; into ; «pofi ; 
make ; jput in. 



For£endy to fend or parry qfi 

JPor^bode, to show be/iyy^iki* 

Hismisphere, half a. sphere. 

IQ(potnecate, to place under [pledge,] 
t« e* to pledge, 
one who » over critieaL 
to pat, or excite spirit in- 
to make brown* 
not noble. 

that can noi be read, 
breaking or mshing » 
mupon* 



HypercnACf 
Jnspirit, 
J^brown, 
not; to Znioble, 
iSegible, 
Jmiptivet 



Exxmcnz 462. 

wxthih; inward. Introspection, a looking tritAMi. 

BENEATH ; bebw. In/rammidane, beneath the world. 

[ BETWEEN ; among ; mu- Intervene, to come between. 
\ tuaUy ; in the midst of. jETntertissned, woven between. 
NEAR ; side by side wim. J«zf oposition, position, near, or beside. 
MaUydieDt, wishinfi; evil [to othen.} 
ilfaZformation, HI or bad formatioiL 
Metamorphose, to form difierently^ i. d^ 



- ILL ; bad; etU. 



^ BBTOND ; differently; af- 
ter ; according to. Method, 



EzEBciSE 453* 



WRONO 
NOT. 



erroneously. 



Mtsf^ojde, 
Non-pm^, 



to ^anfform. 
after, or according to a 
way, or manner. 



to guide trnm^. 
not swearing, or taldag 
the oath. 



* Ab a geuerri thing, In, when prefixed to verbs and participles, signifies m. Info* 
•fi or upon ; when united with other parts of speech, it is a negative. like DiOg 
however, it will be found sometinMS to add nothing to the meaaingof the radical, or, 
at most, merely to give some slight degree of btenrity. 

t The predominant power of Meta, is to eatress change or <raiur/flrsac«. It 1% 
iken&n, citsn eguiyalent to trems. 



ANALYTICAL KAMiriL* 



li» 



Ne 
Ob 

Op 
Off 



Oat 



iroT. 



Obyious, 



Of FBOirr; before ; towards ; ^}^ 
ugamU; down; to make. -^ ' 

Cjpprees, 



rBOv; opposiU. 



O/facouring, 



bbtond; h^ier; more. Outrun, 

EzxaciSE 454. 



Over ABOTx; h^ond; too. O&tfrshoot, 

Para ^ Parasol, 



'^Hdf^^^ ' "^"^ ' """^ ^'"'"'^y' 



Par 

Pen ^ AUfOST ; nearly. Peninsula, 

Per. THSoves; ^unvughlffg by. Perforate, 

Peri ABOUND ; «i(m< ; near. Perimeter, 



Por romra ; farwartU Porrecticm, 

PM aftul P(»^pone, 



Fto 



; previously. Prejudge, 

Exercise 455. 



not either. 
goinginyrDftt or before j 

hence, open, plain, 
shut or closed agaauL 
to bear bigjbre [one ;] 

hence, to* present, 
to press against or 

doiDH. 
that which is scoured 

ojf arfrom^ i. e. the 

refuse, 
to run beyond* 



to shoot beyond. 

[a small canopy to 

shield] from the sun. 
an ode, or song [which 

is but an alteration] 



^t an isla&d.* 
to bore through. 
the measure aroufid, 

[a body or figure,] 

t. e. its limits, 
a stretchinffybr^ 
to place after^ %. e. to 

put oS, 
to judge beforehand. 



Preter b^tond ; past. ' Preternatural, 

Pro roBE ; ybrtfe ; forward ; vn Ptvduce, 
ptace of; according to. i 

Ke again; back; against. JReview, 

Betro BACKWABDS. i^trograde, 

Semi HALF. iSemt-ciicle, 

5tf&nascent, 
' iSttcceed, 
5tt/Tossion, 
-Suggest, 

VNDSB ; €^Ur ; aside ; in Suppnm^ 
place of; smaller. 

iSiMrreption, 



Sub 
Sue 
Suf 



Sap 

Sur 

chibter 



beyond the natural. 

to lead or bring for* 
ioard. 

to yiew again. 

to go backioards. 

hatjfsL circle. 

growing under. 

to follow after. 

the act of digging under. 

to put under [notice,] 
f . e. to hint. 

to ]»ess under, i. e. to 
subdue; to conceal. 

the act of seizing under 
[cover,] i. e. una- 
wares. 



SMerBncnaf flcnving under. 



• TlMt is, m tract of land aknosi sonmiBded bgr watsr. 



IM 



AJUUmOAL UAJXUJkL. 



SXBBCISS 456. 



Stix 

Se 

Sine 

Super 

Snpra 
Syn 

Sym 
Syl 



Trans 
Tran 

Tra 

Ultra 
Un» 

Under 



ovxb; heifond. 
up; iifitoM. 
jkPABT; aside. 

without; destitute qf, 

oTsm; ahwe; beyond. 

ABorc; beyond. 



SuTchaxgdf U) overload. 
Sustain^ tohcMmp^ue»tohuBi. 

jSecede, to go ^wii, i. e. t4 

separate from. 
iSfinecare, [an office of profit,] 

inthoiU employment. 
tSttp^matant, swimming atxyve, t. e* 

on the surface. 
£»ttpraTnlgar, abot>e the vulvar. 



iSynopsis, 



►with; togeOier; alike; joint. ^y^P»%' 
^yZlable, 



a view [of thmgs] t»- 

geiher^ %. e. a gen^* 

eral view, 
feeling mlh [another,] 

i. «. fellow feeling, 
a taking together^ i. e. 

a combination^ [of 
» letters.] 



ExxECisx 457. 



ACB08S: ooer ; beyond; on 



TVan^portedy earned aerotf. 
IVoiisude, tosweat,orooKea<:r0««. 

t^oeAcr^wteo/. 2Vajecting, throwing, or casting 

OMT or across. 

UUramoatecaef beyondibb mountains; 

Unwise, not wise. 

Unbind, to take out of the staie 

tfbmng howad, 

UndetRgsntf an irferior agent. 

l^ift, to li& aloft. 

TVithatajid, to stand against, i. e* 
toreaist. 



BXToirn. 

NOT. 



below; beneath; inferior. 
above; cdoft; onJfigh. 
against; aside; baik. 



SECTION xvin. 



COMPOUND PREFIXE& 



The prefixes are not so variously, nor so frequently comlniied as 
the suffixes. In the exercises of this Section, therefore, though few» 
the pupil may, perhaps, find examples sufficient to enable him fully to 
understand both the mode of combiniDg and defining them. 



* Un, prefixed to veibs and participles, is a privative ; as, C/hbind, to take out of 
the state of being bound. When in union with other parts of speech, it is equivaien*< 
to the negative in, and is often interchanged with it ; as, ITncurable or Jncnrablo 
ITncontestable or Jncoptestabto. 



AKALTTKAL KAKirAL. 



vn 



Im per 

Im per 

Im pro 

In ad 

Ir re 

Co ex 

Fore ad 

Un in 

Un im 

Re an 

In com 

In di 

It re 

His re 

Pre com 

Pre e 

Re ap 

Un sur 

Un pro 

Un as 



Exxacisi 468. 

Jfltperforated, not bored through^ or not jperforated. 
ImperSbctf not thoroughly made or done, or nd 

perfect. 
Jfltprovident^ not seeing or looking fortoard, or not 

provident, i. e. wanting forecast* 
Jfuufvertenty not turning [the mind] to, or not ad* 

vertent, i. e. heedless, negligent. 
Irreclaimable, that can not be called hack [mm vicOi] 

or not reclaimable. 

ExKECiSE 459. , 

Co-extending, stretching out [equally] unth^ or ex* 

tending [equally] with. 
fare-a(2monished, advised to previously, or previously ad^ 

' monished. 

Umhhabitable, that can not be dwelt in, or not mhab- 

itable. 
Ummpressive, not adapted to fix deep upon [the mindj 
or not impressive, 
joined to again, or annexed -o^atn. 



Re-annexed, 

Jncomposite, 

fiuiispersed, 

Irrevocable, 

JkTwreport, 

Preccmtpose, 

Pre-elect, 

jRe-oppordon, 

Un^rpassed, 
Ui^ovoked, 
ZJno^similar, 



Re sub JRe-«i^ect, 



Exercise 460. 

not put or placed together, or not com^ 

posite. 
not scattered, or driven apart, or iu4 

disTperseA, 
that can not be called hack, or that can 

not be revoked, 
to carry hack an erroneous [accounti] 

or to report erroneously. 
to put together previously, or to cpM« 

pose previously. 

Exercise 461. 

to choose out heforehand, or to elect fo. 
^ forehand, 
to portion to again, or to n^portion 

again, 
not passed heyond, i. e. not ea;ceeded. 
not called /ortA, or no< provoked. 
710^ similar to, or not a^imilar. 

Exercise 462. 

to throw or cast under [power] agam, 
or to suh^eci again. 
16 



129 A1IAJC»TTICAL MAXraAL. 

Un trans Dfi<raiuinitted, not sent over or acrosi, or not tnau* 

mitted. 
Somi per Semi-iierspiouousy hilf visible ihraugli^ ox half ^perw^ 

uous. 
Un di Dhdivertedi not turned onde, or aiooy, mX diverted. 

Un pre Gi^^oted, no^/oretold, or not predicted. 

ExxHcisE 463. 

Re in IZ^-mspecty to look isato agairh or to inspect again. 

Re pro jReiproduce, , to bring or \eeid forth again, or to pro* 

dues again. 

In CO Incoherent, not stiokmg together , or not coherent. 

Dis ao Dtfoccustonii to take out of the state of being habitu- 
ated tOy or to take out of the state of 
heing accustomed. 

Un ex Unexhausted, not drawn or drained otO^ or not ex* 

hausted. 



SECTION XIX. 

Those derivatives in which the radicals appear in union with pre- 
fixes, and upon the study of which we now more directly enter, have 
oome to us, at various times and through various channels, chiefly 
fiom the Greek and Latin. The prefixes and suffixes being now sup- 
posed to be well understood, nothing more is required, in order to the 
right apprehension of the Uieral ox primary meanings of this very numer- 
ous class of words, than the easy task of learning the true import of com- 
paratively a few short and simple radicals. From the literal ot primary 
sense, however, j9ow, and to it in every case must be referred, those that 
are figurative or metaphorical . For this reason, the exercises in this and 
the four Sections following, have been so formed and arranged, as to 
make the study of the relations existing between the literal and the 
%urative significations of words, a necessary part of the pupil's duty. 
He is, accordingly, first presented with an exercise containing a few 
radicals defined literally,* each accompanied by particles to be prefix- 
ed ; being then exp^ted, from his knowledge of the elements that en- 
ter into their composition, to give readily the primary meaning of each de- 
rivative thus fermed. But, to give him facility in this, he must be often 
and closely pressed with questions like the following : — What is ^he 
meaning ofvident ?'\ Seeing, Has it a suffix ? If so, what suffix ? 

* As these radicals, for the most part, both separable and inseparable, stand uni- 
ted with 9uffixe9t care must be taken, in each instance, not to confound that part of 
tto definition wUch strictly belongs to the rooU with that which is intended to ex* 
fUSok the Bf^ffix. t See EzerciM 464. 



AMALTnCAL MAKUJLL. 138 

Birr. What is the meaning of eut ? The same as mo, that is, can- 
tinuxng to. What then, is the sense of the root vid ? See. How then 
may I define vident f Seeing, or continidng to see. la vid 9i s^panu 
hie radical? It is not. Is vu2en/ separable. It is not Why? Be- 
eanie it always appears in union teiih a prefix. What prefixes are 
here to be combined with it ? Pro and Itnpro. . What is the meaning 
of Provident? Foreseeing. Improvident? iVirt foreseeing. What 
is the force of Im here ? Negative, What is a negative ? In this 
way, the pupil will soon acquire a degree of accuracy, not otherwiia 
easy to be attained. 

The elements, both separately, and in combination, bemg well un- 
derstood, the scholar then comes to an exercise, sometimes more than 
one, in which the same radicaJs, or most of them, appear in conneo- 
tioh with the prefixes, the literal signification of the whole combinatbn 
stated, and the attempt made to exhibit the manner in which the figiu 
ratire, or metaphorical, have arisen from the primary applications. 
Those exercises in which the radicals stand apart from the prefixes. 
as the first one below, are to be written according to the model [No. 4,*J 
at the head of Section XXII. ; the others, according to that on pag9 
86, No. 3. 

ExxKCisx 464. 

vident, > seeing, or looking. 

t7mon,f \ the act of seeing, or looking. 

vvnceiX > to conquer ; to subdue. 

victioHf \ the act of conquering. 

varicate, to go astride, or crookedly ; to deviate from a 

direct course. 
vulgaUon,^ the act of spreading among the people, 
vey, > to bear, or carry. 

veXf ( borne, or carried. 

vey^ to see, or look. 

* Thk model [No. 4] will Borve to show the mode of wnting all the eiefdMi of 
the same kind in this, and the four Sections, next succeeding. 

t The design of the Brace t*^^^] after tiie radical forms vident and m&ion, k to 
indicate their common origin. The popil will not nnfreqoentlj find two or mora Un- 
died forms connected in this way, and may hence know that they are tzaeeahle 1o 
the same ofiginal Bonroe. 

t Note that most of these rvlical forms admit m nmnber of suffixes not here set 
down, thus forming nnmerous English words by a simple' change of terminatSon. A 
good ora2 exercise, after the regular lesson, is to train the pupil in thus fbrmfaig and 
defining derivativea. The teacher will of course guard hisscliolBn against the eirar 
of aaroming the ri^t to form and use words not already sanctiooed by reputable oqs- 
torn. From the roots above, legitimate words may thus be formed:— 
Vis, yistoe, ykwU, ykiSk, ymbhff risioii, visionary. 
FniM, ymetUefyincibUnes, ^ 

Vict, victor, viotreM, victory, victoridot, victonouWy. 
Vulg, vulgar, vulgarly, vulgarity, vulgarism, vulgwrire, &o. &c 
i The root of this wonl is the I^din vulous, the common feofU ; the ^of^nlMC. 



Fix) 


Impro 


Pro 


Super 


Con £ 


Con E 


Di 


Pre 


Di 


E 


Con Recon 


Con De 


Sur Pur 



IM 



AMALTTIGAL KM(UAL. 



ExERCiss 465. 

Provide, to foresee ItMngs for the future ;1 hence, ed ential enoe 

to get ready beforehand ; to furnish* 
Provision, the act of providing ; anything provided, al ally saj 
Convince, to conquer fully [in argument ;] hence, ed ingly ibfe 

to prove to one^ satis&ction. 
Convict, to overcome fully [one T'em/sn^ a c^kor^e ed ive ion 

of guilt,] i. e. to prove him guilty. 
Prevaricate, to go very crookedly ; hence, to shuffle ; ed ing er 

to quibble ; to evade. 
Divaricate, to straddle apart, i. e. to separate into ed Ing ion 

two branches ; to fork. 
Divulge, to scatter among the people, L e. to tell ; ed ate ing 

to publish. 
Convey,* to carry with [o^e ;] to bear away ; to ed ing anoa 

transfer. 
Convex, carried with [the concave, i. e. over it ;] ity edly Ij 

hence, sibbous ; opposed to concave^ 
Purvey, to look ror; i. e. to provide, or pro- ed anoe or 

•cure. 
Survey, to look over; to supervise; to superin- ed al orship 

tend. 



In Ambi 
Re Sobter 
Apo Syn 
In IHsin 
En De 
En Dis 

Ac 

Ac 



In 
In 



Ex Dis 



dexterity,t 

copate, 

carcerate, 

camp,j: 

courage,§ 

cend, i 

censian, \ 

cruoiating,|| 



ExxRcxsE 466. 

quality of being dextrous, 
a fleeing, or retreating, 
to cut. 



to imprison. 

a plain, or field. 

vigor of heart, i. e. valor ; bravery. 

to glow ; to fire, or inflame. 

the act of firing, or inflaming. 

torturing. 



* In each of the words, convey, purFey, and rarvey, the radical part vey, is, ia 
lorm, the same ; and it mjgbt thence be inferred, that the same ra^Kcal sense belongs 
to them all But, as the Braces indicate, vey in convey, com^s from a different root, 
[VMHO, vekare, vizi, vectum,] from vey in purvey and eurvey, which latter [French, 
voir,] like vident and viaion, is from vidbo, vidare, vidi, yisum, to 9ee. 

t Dexterity is from the Latin dexter, the right hand; and, sfaice we more readily 
and skillfully use the right than the left hand, we have dextroue, dextreuely, dex^ 
inmenees and dexterity, which all unply skill or expertneee, 

t Camp, from the tjatin eampus, literally signifies a field, bat is in English re* 
stricted to a field, or ground on which a body of soldiers pitch their tents. 

^ Courage is from the Latin ear [^np,] the heart The termhiation age indicates 
spirt^, aetM or vt^or . 

I Crudatmg fimn encm, a Latm verb derived fhim the noon eruxi eruei*, a 



ASJOXnCAL KAinrAlM 



1S5 



au8 ousneatitj 



ee 



ed ing 


ion 


atedize 


ist 


ible ibilky 
ed iary 
ed ment 


ed 

ions 

ive 


ed ing 


ory 


atedable 


atka 



ExsBCiBx 467. 

Ambidexter, one having, as it were, adovUs right 
hand^ i. e. one that uses both hands 
equally well ; henoe, alsc^ a dou- 
ble-dealer. 

Refuge, a fleeing back [from danger or dds- 
tresi /] hence, a shelter ; a retreat. 

Subterfuge, a flying under [covert to conceal 
tndh ;] hence, a shift ; an evasion. 

Apocopate, to cut ofl* [one or more leUer$\ from 
[the end of a wordJX 

Syncope, the cutting away [of Utters from ihe 
middle of a word^ 

Accend, to fire, or mflame. 

Inoend, to kindle fire in ; hence, to incense. 

Incense, to inflame, or kindle [angry jMi^nbiw] 
in [^ mmd of OMUi^iker^ 

Incense, to set fire to, or bum [odoroua sub* 
stances m religious rites.] 

Excruci, to torture excessively. 



Exercise 468. 

En Ac croachy* to hook, or draw with a hook. 

Ea Disen cumber, to load ; to check, or retard, as by a k)ad. 

Per Trans colate^ to strain [a Uquor.] 

In Con culcatey to tread, or trample under foot. 

IHb Coa color, to tinge i to dye ; to paint. 

Sinf Insin cere, wax. 

Ex Pre cogitate^ to put in motion, or exercise [one*s mM^] 

henoe, to think. 

Re Pre cognition, knowledge. 

Dis Per ct^ent^ shaking. 

Inter Sub cutaneous, pertaining to the skin. 

Exercise A691 

Encroach, todrawin[toone'^«e^,]aswithahook; ed er ment 

hence, to intrude ; to trespass. 
Disencumber, to take out of the state of being loaded, ed ing s 

or embarrassed. 
Percolate, to strain through ; to fiker. * ed ing ion 

* From the French croc, a hook. 

t See the explanation of nneere in the next exeidM. 

t Cogitate, here taken as a radical, is, in fact, a derivatiTe of eon and agito, (ok 
ego,) to put in motion ; to drivie. So, abo, with cognition, which is firoul sognKM^ 
the pert part of cognooco, a veifo formed finnn eon and nooco, to know. 



196 



lHALrnCA£ XAHtTAL. 



Inculcate^ to tread in, or upon ; and, thence, to ed ing ion 

enicHTde by frequent repetition. 
Discolor, to deprive of the natural or proper ed ing ati<»i 

color ; to alter the appearance. 
Sincere, without wax, [as honey ; J hence, clear ; ly ity est 

pure ; real. 
Excogitate, to think, or reason out ; to invent ; to ed ing ion 

contrive. 
Recogni, to know again, or to acknowledge. ize izing itum 



ExxRciss 470. 



In 

En 

In 

En 

En 

Ante 

Sur 

Be 

Con 



De 

Per 

Ob 

Epi 

In 

Post 

Counter 

Un 

Dif 



deooroai, 
dure, > 
durate, y 
demicj 
donej 
diluviany 

fit, \ 
fide, 



decent; becoming; orderly, 

hard or firm.. 

hardened. 

relating to, or i 

to back or put on the I 

pertaining to the flood. 

to make or do. 

to make {suitable,) 

to trust or have faith. 



EzsRCiss 471. 



Dedecorous, 
Bodure, 

Obdurate, 
Indorse, 

Epidemic, ^ 

Surfeit, 

Counterfeit, 

Confide, 
Diffide, 



.Af 
Con 
Con 
Re 
Con 

Ctia 



not decorous ; disgraceful. 

to make hard, or unyielding \to Umey 
wear or decay y] to last ; to suffer. 

greatly hardened [in heart;'] stubborn. 

to put on the back \pf a note, one's 
name as responsibleJ] 

[a disease] upon the people, i. e. prev- 
alent among the people. 

to do above [measure ;] to overdo, and, 
hence, to overload [ike stomach.] 

to make correspondent; to imitate 
[specially f legal coin or hank notes.] 

to trust with or in ; to rely upon. 

to be without, or destitute of trust in ; 
to lack confidence in. 



ance ed ing > 



oy 

ment 



ion 
aUe 



ed 



mg er 



ed ly 



er 



ent 
ent 



ence ential 
ently ence 



Dis 


franchise. 


De 

Af 


flagration, 
front. 


Super 
De 


fine, 
fine, 


Be 
Re 


spersSf 



ExKKCiSE 472. 

to make free. 

the act of burning. 

the forepart ; the face. 

small; thin; delicate; not coarse. 

the end, bound or limit. 

to scatter ; to spread. 

to pour. 



ANALXnCAI. KAnUAL. 



im 



Ob In 


fiucaU. to darken or obacnire. 






Con Diso^ gruUyf ^8 quality of being suitable ; agreement. 




Exercise 473. 






Disfranchise, to take out of the state of being free [as 


ment ed 


ing 




a citizen.] 






Confront 


to front together, that is, to place &ce 
to face. 


ed ing 


aticn 


Affront 


to face, or front towards [in a hoMe or 
insolent manner ;] to insult. 


ed ive 


er 


Refine, 


to make very fine ; to render delicate ; 
to clarify. 


raeht ed 


ing 


Confine, 


to enclose within certain limits. 


less ment ed 


Define, 


to l;mit exactly [chiefly the meaning of 
words ;] to determine. 


ition ite 


itive 


Con/ate, 


to pour together or mix, [as hot and 
cold water ;] hence, to weaken an 
argument; to disprove. 


able ed 


ant 


Refute, 


to pour back [upon an antagonist in ar- 


able ation ed 




gument ;] hence, to show to be false, 








or unsound. 






Congru, 


agreeing together ; consistent. 


ous ent 


ity 



Exercise 474. 

Pis Ag grace, favor. 

Apo Peri gee^ ' the earth. 

11 Preter, legal, lawful. 

Sub* Supra* lapsarian^ relating to the fall (of ^daiw.) 

Col De liquate, to melt ; to fuse. 

Pro E long, extended, or protracted. 

E Pur fom, far away. 

E Inter lope, to run, or leap. 

Exercise 475. 

Disgrace, to deprive of favor ; to bring tp shame, ed ful fulness 
Apogeef [that point in a fLaneCs orbit most dis- 

tant] from the earth. 
CoUiqu, to melt together ; to dissolve. able ated ative 

Prolongate, to stretch forth, or lengthen out [in ed ing ion 

space or time.] 
Elongate, to lengthen out ; to remove to a dis* ed ing ion 

tanoe. 
Purloin, to take off, or away for [one'^^e^,] i.e. ed ing er 

to steal. 



• Sob hem means t^Ur; sopra before, t The opposite of a^to^^^i&'^QDs^Bif^ 



128 



AlCALTTIGAI. KAI^AL. 



Elope, to run (Jiff [prhately and without kaveJl ed ing ment 

{nterlopey to run between (parties engaged for ed itig er 

miUtud advantage ;] to intrude ; to 

intercept. 



Bi Col 

Ante Post 
Meta Ana* 
Dia Hyper 
UndeDe 
Anti Un 
Ad Per 
Ira Per 
Ad Com 



lateral, 

meridian, 

morphosis, 

meter, 

moHshedf 

musical, 

mufsible, 

miscible, ^ 

mixture, ( 



Exercise 476. 

pertaining to the side. 

midday;' noon. 

formation. 

measure. 

formed into a mole, mass or pile. 

containing, or pertaining to music. 

capable of being, or fit to be sent 

capable of being, or fit to be mixed. 

the act of mixing. 



£x£acnx 477. 



Collateral, beifag side with, or by side ; concur- 

rent; indirect. 
Metamorphose, to form differently ; to transform. 
Diameter, the measure, or line through [the 

centre of a figure, which divides 

it into two equal parts*^ 
Demolf to cast down a pile, or structure ; to 

destroy. 
Permissible, that may, or can be sent or passed 

through ; allowable. 
Permiscible, oapable of being mixed thoroughly. 
Commix, to mix, or mingle together. 



ness 



ed idg 
ical ically 



er 



ish ishment ition 



neas 



nesB 
ed ing 



ture 



ExEaciBE 478. 



Be 

Ex 

In 

Pen 

Bene 

Con 

Apo 



Hypo:}: Meta 
Inter Re 



Fore 

Con 

De 

Antepen ultimate, 

Male volmity 

Di verge, 

Exf 



token, a sign. 

temporary, pertaining to the time. 

tonation, the act of sounding. 

last; froal. 

wishing, or desiring. 

to tend, or incline. 

a standing, or putting. 

a standing, or putting. 

to make smootn and glossy ; to refine. 



t AnamorphosiSi literally, a forming agaiUi or renewed formation. The word ii 
applied in Perspective Drawmg, to any monstrous projection of a figure, by which, 
at one point of view, it is made to present a form in gross deviation ftom nature, while 
at another, it exhibits a representation exact and true. 

t Also written €€9ta$y. 

t HypoatasUf or hypQ9ta9y, literally aplaeing as Uying mtdsr, or that which is 



JUfALTTlOAL JUMUAXt. 



l» 



aneousally izs 

aneous ary arineM 

ed atioQ ated 
ed ing ioQ 
ed ing ation 



ent 



ed encj 



ing ent inglj 
tize tioal atef 
tic tical 



Exxmciss 479. 

E«teinppre» [armng] fiom the time, or occationi 

that is, unpremeditated. 
CoiOempary at the time with, i. e. being or living 

in the same age or period. 
Intone, to make, or utter a deep, loud sound. 

Detonate, to sound aloud ; to explode. 
Detonize> to detonate ; to bum with an explo- 
sion. 
Converge, to turn together [to the same point y] 

to bear or tend towards [the same 

mark.] 
Diverge, to tend, or turn apart from [a poirUt 

as rays of light,] 
Apostasy,* a standing away, i. e. departure from 

[ane^s faith or profession,'] 
Extasy,* a standing, or putting [of the mind] 

out of [tiie natural state ;] hence, 

a trance ; rapture ; enthusiasm. 
Metastasis, the putting over, i. e. removal [of a 

disease from one part to another.] 

Exercise 480. 

Aph Di teresis, the act of taking. 

A Di phylhusy having, or beanng leaves. 

Em Disem broil, noisy strife. 

An:|: • Syn archyy rule, or government 

Ad Re-ad just, right; proper. 

Ap§ Peri heUon^ the Sun. 

Di Subdi vide^ > to separate. 

Di Subdi mtfum,|| S the act of separating. 

Exercise 481. 

Aphseresis, the taking [a letter or syllable] from [the be- 
ginning of a word,] 
Diseresis, the taking apart or division [of a diphthong,] 
Embroil, to put in noisy strife ; to perplex ; to disturb. 
Anarch, one without rule, or who produces confusion. 



ed 

y 



ing meni 
ical ism 



placed under, properly siigniiies whstanee or tubsistence. It waa, hence, used hf 
theological writers, to denote the distmct substance or personality of the persons in 
the Godhead. 

* Drop the last tu>o letters of this word, upon adding the suffixes. 

t Apostate is applied to a person who renounces his faith. 

t Jnt [ana] in the word anarchy, signifies, witiumt or destitute •/. 

§ See apoffee, in Exercise 475, page 127. 

II Vision, m the exercise above, though the same m form, is not to oe confoondea 
with vimtt, He aetof seeing, [Ex. 464] which is from a difikent root. 

17 



190 



AJXALYTIDAL XAMVAJC.. 



Aijusti to make just or exact to[nUe or meAod;} 

to arrange, or order. 
Divide, to separate into parts ; to sever. 
Dms, to divide. 



ed er mem 

ed inff er 
ioniUb iooal 



ExxRciss 482. 



AblM 

Ad Mal-ad 
Ex At 
E Ab 
In Ex 
In Ex 
P6r Inter 
At De 
In tie 



minister, 

tenuate 

normouSf 

hahy 

hume, 

meatUm 

rive 

novate, 



the act of washing or watering. 

to serve ; to supply ; one who ministers^ 

to make thin or slender. 

pertaining or according to rule. 

to breathe, or take breath. 

the ground ; the soil. 

the act of goin^ or passing. 

a stream ; a nver. 

to make new. 



Exercise 483. 



Ahlu, to wash off from ; to cleanse. 

Dilute, to wash apart, or thin by washing, or 

watering ; to weaken by admixture. 
Extenuate, to make very thin, or slight ; to dimin- 
ish. 
Enorm, beyond, or out of rule or measure ; ex- 

cessive. 
Exhale, to breathe but, or emit ; [as vapor or 

fume,] and, generally, to draw forth. 
Perme* to go or pass through ; to pervade. 
Arrivef to flow to, or reach [the shore or any 

point] by water ; hence, to come to ; 
to attain. 
Derive,f to flow from [its source,] as a river ; 

hence, to come from ; also, to draw 

from. 
Innovate, to brmg in [something] new, i. e. to 
change or alter. 



ent tion 

ion ed er 

ed ing ion 

ity ously ouaness 

ed able ant 

able ant ate 

al ed ing 

ed ative able 

ed ing ioD 



Aba 
Abs 
Dis 
Com 



De 
De 
Re 
Pre 



terge, ) 
tersive, ^ 
integrate, 
pare. 



Exercise 484. 

to wipe ; to cleanse, 
tending to cleanse, 
to make whole ; to renew, 
to make equal, fit or ready. 



* The final e of this fonn is not to be omitted upon Bddmg the safflbtes. 
t The explanatious ffven above are founded upon the assamption, that Ihe ladU 
eaipart both of arrive 9Hd derive, is the latiiirivue, m i ' 



JkVALrnCAL KAHOAL. 



in 



At Con 

£s De 

Circum Contra 

Di Com 

Im Inter 

Im Pre 



trectaHani the act of feeling or handling. 

velapf a cover or nrrapper. % 

vaUationy the act of fortifying with a rampart. 

minutiony the act of making fii^ or small, 

mediate, middle ; being in the midst or between* 

matnre, ripe. 



Exxxcisx 485. 



ed 
ed 



abla 



Absterge, to wipe off; to clear away. 
Compare,* to make equal with [for the purpose of 

illustroHon ;] to liken. 
Prepare,* to make equal, or adequate beforehand ation atory edaam 

[to the occasion,] hence, to make or 

get ready: 
to put under cover, or into a wrapper. 



Envelop, 
Develop, 
Dimin, 
Immediate, 



to uncover ; to lay open ; to unfold. 



to make smaller ; to lessen. 

not having [any ohstaclel in the midst; 

direct; instant 
Premature, ripe before [the due season ;] happ^i- 

ing before the proper time. 



ed 
ed 
ish 



ing 
ing 



ing 

ing ment 
ution utivf 
cy 



ity ly 



neai 



Exercise 486. 



E 
£ 
Di 

Anti 

En 

Con 

Ad 

Ad 

Con 



Col 

Col 

Ext 

Sub 

Syn 

Recon 

Inad 

Co-ad 

Uncon 



Me, > 

lision, y 

still, 

acid, 

ergeUc, 

dense, 

equate, 

jutar, 

jugai. 



to strike or dash, 
the act o( striking or clashing, 
to fall iii drops ; to drop, 
sour ; sharp to the taste, 
working or operating, 
close; compact, 
equal, or made equal, 
an aid or asdstant. 
pertaining to a yoke. 



Exercise 487. 



to strike off [fetter*] from [a word.] 
to drop separately, or to fall drop by drop, 
to work, or operate in or on ; hence, to em- 
power ; to invigor. 
Condense, to make close together, that is, to compress, 
or thicken, 
equal to ; equivalent, 
to aid towards [any thing ;] to help. 



Elide, 
Distill, 
Energ, 



Adequate, 
Adjute, 



ed inff 

ed ^le atidQ 

etic ize y 

ed ation able 

ly neas cy 
ant ancyory 



* It is here aasiimed that pare in compare and prepare, [compare, praparo] isths 
XjBtinjpor, which meam equaL 
t WrittenexIfU. 



182 



AXALTnCAL XUfVAL. 



Conjugaly pertaining to the [wujrriage] yoke. ly 

C^jugate, te yoke, or join tc^iher[inor(2er,fft0ouMK2f« ed ing ioa 
l0iMe#9 makbers and per9aru if a verb.] 

.^ ExKBciss 488. 

Ob In noxious, harmful ; hurtful ; guilty. 

De Sub* nude, naked. 

Ob B nubilate, to cloud. 

Con An nex, > to join. 

Con Inter nect, ) to join. 

Di A arUHc, limiting; determinate* 

Co In operative, working. 

His Pre opinion, a thou^t, or sentiment ; a judgment. 

{te Dis organize, to form or furnish with organs. 

Im Oyer ponderous, weighty; heavy. 

ExsRciss 489. * 

Denude, to make quite naked ; to strip. 

Annex, to join to. 

Connex, to join together. 

Connect, . to join together. 

Aorist, without Umit, that is [a tense] indefi- 

nite or indeterminate. 

Disorganize, to take out of the state of being organ- 
ized ; to disarrange. 

Co-operate, to work t(^ether ;. to aid mutually. 

Impondeff without weight, or not weighing any 
tMng. 



ed 


ing 
a&n 


atioQ 


ed 


mg 


ive ion 




ive 


ion 


edly 


ic 






ed 


ation'er 


ive 


ed 


ion 


OUfl 


lable 


abiHty 



Dis Ex pand^ ) 

Dis Ex paneumf ) 

Ex Im pedUey 

Pre Im potent, 

Im Re-im pmge, } 

Imf Com pact, ) 

Ap De preciaUf 

Im De precaUf 



ExxacisE 490. 

to lay open ; to spread, 
the act of la3ring open or 
to put, or place the foot, 
havinff power, 
to strike, dash or drive, 
to drive ; to press, 
to prize, or value, 
to pray. 

Exercise 491. 



Expand, 

Expanse, 

Expedite, 



to spread out ; to dilate ; to extend, 
spread out ; extended ; a wide extent, 
to take out, or free one's foot \Jrom a 

snare or hindrance ;] and, hence, to 

hasten. 



ed ing s 
ile ibuity ive 
ed ious ive 



-U 



* Svhnude, alnuui naked ; when subia iaUauift, 



ANALYTICAL XANUAL. 



188 



Impede, to put one's feM into [fetUrs ;] and, ed ing 

hence, generally, to letter ; to hinder. 
Compact, to strike tOjrather[Aafu{«,a«jiar£^ ma ed ne« 

hargcmh] i. e. to league with ; to 

drive, or press closely together. 
Appreciate, to value iu^cording to [merit;] to esti- ed ion 

mate. 
Depreciate, to take from the true value ; to under- ed iag 

value ; to lessen. 
Imprecate, to pray for, or invoke [evU] upon l<my ed ing 

one,'] 
Deprecate, to pray [to he delivered, or shielded] ive or 

fro ■ 



from ; to regret deeply. 



iment 
able 

8 

cry 
cry 



Dis 
Dis 

Re 

Ap 



Ex 

Anti 

Ante 

Trans 
Com 
JH 
Di 



Explode, 

DispJos, 

Apode, 

Antipode, 



Transparent, 

Apparent, 

Appell, 



Diphthong, 



Exercise 492. 

plode,* > to clap together. 

plosiouy ) the act of clapping, or striking together. 

pode^ a foot. 

past, food ; any thing that is eaten for nouiisk 

ment. 

parent, visible; appearing. 

peUation, the act of naming, or calling. 

petaJous, having petals, or flower-leaves. * 

phthong, a sound. 

Exercise 493. 

to clap o£E^' or reject, [as a bad actor ;] ed^ ing er 

to expel with great noise ; to burst, 
to burst with a loud report, 
without feet, 
[one having his] feet opposite [to oitrs,] 

hence, an inhabitant of ^e opposite 

side of the globe, 
that may be seen thiKMigh ; clear, 
seeming to [<&e eye ;] visiUe. 
to name, or call ; also to call, or remove ation ative ant 

a cause from a lower to a higher 

tribunal, 
a double sound, or the union of two 

sounds in one syllable. 



ion 

al 

al 



ive 



oy 



* Plode ttad plosion aie from the Latin T«rb pxjiudo, BUfiae, flaobum, a^ __ 
there aj^Ued to Dddies struck together, or brought kto violent contact, chiefly in to* 
ken of approbation, at the tiieatre or other places of pnUic entertainment. It thenoe 
' had the signification, to mtike a soond, or noise bj clapping or striking together, as 
the hands, the wings of a bird, dtc. - We have, also, from this root, o^er En|^ 
woids in which this primary sense will be readily recognized ; as, tMlaud, appumssi 



IM 



AKALTnCAL XAHUAL. 



Per 

Em 
Mis 
Im 
Ex 



Im 
De 

Inter 

Counter 

Dis 



Com Inter 
Ab Cor 



Ab 
Ar 
Ar 



Cor 
Cor 
Cor 



fettaUf 

pointi 
mure, 

punctUm, 5 

raaiony \ 
rode, > 



SzxKCisi: 494. 

to effect. 

to fold. 

to dot. 

a wall. 

to prick, or puncture. 

the act of puncturing. 

to shave, scrape, or scratdh. 

the act of scraping, or scratching. 

to gnaw. 

the act of gnawing. 



ExEiciSK 4d6. 



hipetr, to effect, or obtain [by entreaty, or other 
Uke exertion^] 

Perpetrate, to do thoroughly \8ome evil,] or to eS&ot 
by, or through levil means,'] 

Employ, to fold in, involve or engage m [any af- 
fair ;] to hire. 

Deploy, to unfold, open or extend [the line, orfroni 
of an army.] 

Immure, to wall in, or confine closely. 

Expunge, to prick out, or erase by punctures ; and, 
generally, to erase ; to blot out. 

Compunct, pricked within, or at heart, [on account 
ofgrnU,] 

Corrodsy to gnaw, or eat away .entirely ; to con- 
sume ; to prey upon. 

CorrosiTe, eating, or tending to eat away ; having 
power to wear away.. 



ation able ativt 


ed 


ioD 


or 


menter 


abk 


ed 


ing 


es , 


ed 
ed 


iog 
ing 


es 
es 


ion 


ive 


ious 


ible 


ent 


kte 


ness 


ly 





Ar 



De 
De 
Dis 
De 
Con 



Bx 
In 
Per Dis 

Per Dis 
As In 
Re In 
Ab Pre 



Deride, 



ride, ) 

rintm, ) 

robe, 

eiccant, 

spissation, 

suade. 



J 



suasion, 
surgent, 
ewrrection, 
sent, ' 



to laugh 
iodemie 



JSxmtciix 49d* 

to laugh. 

the act of laughing. "" 

a loose gown, or gannient. 

drying, or draining. 

the act of making thick, close, or dense. 

to represent as pleasing, or in a pleasing man* 
ner ; hence, to urge, or advise. 

the act of urging by pleasing repesentations. 
> rising. 
^ the act of rising. 

being. 

ExxacisB 4d7. 



at; to mock; to jeer. 
; to ridicule. 



ed lag ingly 
ive ivelyoxy 



AStAVmKUJU UUkMVAU 



Utl 



Hiwcoftto, to drfy c»r drain out ; to free from mois- 
ture. 

Persuade, to urge thoroughly, or warmly; to en. - 
treat. 

Verstuu, to persuade. 

Dissuade, to represent [any thing in a manner not 
pteasmg ;] hence, to advise against. 

Absent, being away from; as, a verb; to with- 
draw ; to keep away from. 

Present, beiqg before, in front of, or at hand ; as, 
a verb ; to put before or in front of; 
to offer. 



ed ing 



ed 



mg 



loa 



ible 


ive 


ory 


ed 


mg 


er 


oe 


ee 


ing 


ce 


ation ed 



Exercise 498. 



Ex* 

Con 

Con 

Con 

Ana 

At 

Ex 

Pro 

Con 



Tran 

Per 

Anticon 

Incon 

Dicho 

De 

In 

Ex 

in 



9ude, 


to sweat ; to issue like sweat 


Ungent, ^ 


1 touching. 


tagiousy S 


' touching. 


tiguouSf 3 


1 touching. 


tomy. 


a cutting. 


iach, 


to take ; to hold ; to make fast 


trieate, 


to- hinder, or impede ; to perplex. 


tuherant 


swelling or rising. 


dolent. 


grieving. 



Exercise 499. 



Contingent, touching, or occurring together, [as 
events ;] and, hence, happening in 
connection with ; casual. 

Conto^, touching together, [applied to diseas- 
es ;] and, hence, infecting by con- 
tact. 

Con%ii, touching together, [as places;] and, 
hence, neighboring ; bordering up- 
on ;. adjoining. 

Anatom, a cutting apart ; dissection [of an an- 
imal oody.] 

Intricate, to put into perplexity ; to entangle. 

Extricate, to free from perplexity or embarrass- 
ment ; to deliver from difficulty. 

pTotuher, to swell forth, or out ; to bulge out. 

Condole, to grieve with, [another,] i. e. to sym- 
pathize. 

Indolent, not grievuig, or being anxious about; 
hence, at ease ; idle ; slothful. 



cy ly 



ness 



ion ous ousness 



ous ously ity 



y 

ed 



ant 
ed 

oe 



ize ical 



cy 
ion ing 

ous ate 
ing ment 



* Commonly written exudt. 



UI6 



AMALvmAL kamval; 



SECTION XEL 




EzEKcisi 500. 

to cry, or weep ; to call out ; to lament* 

the act of rubbii^ ; frictkm. 

to make of, or invest whb, flesh. 

to pour. 

to pour. 

the act of sitting ; a sitting. 

the. act of going [over ;"] a yielding. 

EXERCISS 501. 



Explore, to cry out, or call earnestly [for any 
ihtrng;} hence, the signification, to seek, 
or search out. 

Implore, to cry to, or call upon with tears ; hence, 
to beseech ; to entreat. 

Deplore, to cry after, or lament deeply ; to bewail. 

Contrite, nibbed together, i. e. bruised, or crushed 
\m spirU ;] broken-hearted ; penitent. 

Incam, to put in flesh, or to put on a fleshly 
body. 

Refund, to pour back ; and hence, to restore ; to 
pay back. 

Refuse, to pour back [as idhy or useless;] hence, 
to reject ; to deny. 

Assess, to sit [for the purpose of imposing a tax, or 
duty;] hence, to fix the sum to be tax- 
ed, or levied. 



ation ator atory 



ed ing er 

able ablyed 
ly ness ion 



ate ative atioD 

ed ing er 

al able ed 

or able ment 







ExxaciSE 502. 


Ac 


Dis Re 


crimination, the act of separating, or marking [whai 
is wrong, or criminal ;] hence, accu- 
sation ; a chaise of guilt 


Ex 


Ckfa In 


caveOton, the act of hollowing, or scooping out. 


De 


Dis In 


dde, , > to cut. 

cision,* J the act of cutting. 


Con 


Ex Re 


Ex 


Di Re 


sand, ) to cut 

scission,,* ) the act of cutting. 


Ab 


Re Di 



* Cision and «eiMtOfi, though alike in sense and sound, are fnrn different roots, 
an4 hence their dif^ence in &m. They are both found united with prefisw; thus 
nving rise to deriTative words which are yerj likely to be misspelled. Thua we have 
MxeUion, Absdswm : Reciasion, Rescission ; Decision, Discission, &c., in which,, 
without the explanation above, we might expect to find the radical the same infami 
ibnfoghout 



JJOLTtlCAX, KAKUIJU 187 

JLe Ex Ra ^iiii^^ a cause, or trial, [dU^ te te;l A 

charge of guilt. 
De Difl la serve,* to slave; to wait upon; to aid. 

Pre Con Re #«rre,* to keep; to hold. 

ExxRciSE 503. 

Discriminate, to separate nicely [between Mugs/] ive ately in|r 

- to distinguish, or note difierences. 
Recriminate, to criminate in return; to return an cry ive ed 

accusation, or charge. 
Ckmcave, hollow; arched, the opposite of convear.f ity nessous 
Decide, to out off [a case pendingy or indtsptOe;] ed ing adiy 

to settle ; to end. 
Besciss, to cut off again, [a resolutUm, ady or ion ory 

law ;] to revoke ; to repeal. 
Recuse, to return, or give a cause [for not do- ant anoy ation 

mg, or being untoUHng to do /\ to re- 
fuse ; to reject. 
Accuse, to hring to trial, or to bring a cause or ed able ation 

charge against. 
Excuse, to free trom [the charge of blame /] to less ableatoiy 

exculpate ; to acquit. 

Exercise 504. 

Inserve, to serve, or aid in [any thing ;] to minis- kaai ed ing 

ter to; to assist. 
Deserve, to serve thoroughly; and, hence, to ed ing edly 

earn by service ; to merit. ^ 

Disserve, to deprive of service ; hence, generally, ice ioeable ed 

to harm ; to injure. 
Reserve, to keep back [tUl the proper Ume, or for edly ing atiOQ 

Juture use ;] to withhold ; to lay up. 
Preserve, to keep, or Iwld [a shield, or cover! be- ed er ative 

fere; hence, to protect; to shelter; 

to keep safe. 
Conserve, to keep together ; hence, to keep, or pre- able ative atory 

serve a thing whole, sound, or un- 
harmed. 







Exercise 505< 


Dis Ac 

Mis Re 


Con 
Under 


credit, to I 
write, to t 



to believe, or trust. 

to trace, or form letters ; to ex- 
press by tracing letters, or char- 
acters [on anp ihing.} 

* Serve, to tdwt, m from eervio ^— ^mtm, to keq>, fhun eerva. 
t See the einlanation of this weed in £iien»e465. 

1^ 



188 4JULTTICAI. lumrAju * 

Bm Dben Be-cm body to put into fimn ; togive bodily 

shape to. 
Be Self After bve^ to regard with strong affection ; 

to prefer greatly. 
Com Im Incom measurable, > capable of being measured. 
Com Im Incom mensurate, > to measure ; also, measured* 
Sur Be Over pass, to step, or go. 

Em. Im Over power, strengdi; ability. 

£XSR€I8X 506. 

Aoerediti to credit, or give credit to; to believe; ed ing ation 

to admit as true. 
Discredit^ not to credit ; to disbelieve ; also, to ed ing able 

bring into discredit, or disgrace. 
Bmbody, to put into a body ; to form ; to unite, ing ed ment 
Surpass, to pass over, or beyond ; to excel ; to ea ing ingly 

exceed. 
Trof^paas,'" to pass over [due Umits;] hence, to ed ing es 

transgress. 
Cmnmensur, to measure with, or alike ; to reduce able ately ability 

to, or have the same measure or ex- 
tent. 
Empower, to put in power, or authority ; to en- ed ing s 

able. 
Overpower, to overcome, or subdue by superior ed ing s 

force ; to defeat. . 

£X££CISK 507. 

Com De Re mandy'\ > to give into the hands [ofanotha .1 
Ooiti Reoom Discom mend, ) togiveintothehands[of<MtalAer.j 
A Eu Dys p^y, concoction [of^hod in the rtom- 

ach ;] digestion. 
Com Inter Im mingle, to mix. 

Inter Extra Supra • foliaceous, ^ leafy ; consisting of leaves. 
In De Per foliation, > the leafing of plants ; the act of 

) beating into a foil. 
Syn Meth Peri od,X a road ; a way ; a journey ; a 

course. 
Sub Trans Ultra marine, pertaining to the sea^ 

• TiMt Ss, trjan9p&M. 

t JIf and mod mmnd are from the Latin mando, a verb compounded of nuimu, the 
hand, and do, to give. See the explanation of the derivatives in the next exercise. 

t From the Greek bids, a road, way or journey. Besides the fbrms gtven. above, 
we have Exodus and exody, tAgidfying q journey from at out if , and partienlariy 
4PpGw} to the d^partnre of the fanelitM from EqypL 



JMALTnCJLL UASVAL. 



JM 



EXERCISB 608. 

Commatid, to give fully into [one's] hands [a diarge ant ress meat 

or communion ;] to orden 
Demand, to require from [one's] hands [aiif thing ed abk» er 

commuted 1o him ;] generally^ to ask' 

or claim. 
Remand, to give baok into the hands [of an qfi- ed ing 

cor /] to order back [to prison,] 
Commendy to give into the hands [^ an another^ able adon atory 

any person or thingy as estmdbU or 

tnuUtooriky f\ to praise. 
Synody a journeying together ; hence, a meet- ical ically al ' 

ing ; a council. 
Period, a way, or course around; a circuit; ic ical ically 

an orbit; the time of making a cir^ 

cuit ; an end. i 

Method, according to [some particular'] way, that ical ically ism 

is, a mode; a manner; an arrange- 
ment. 









SIXGRCISE 509. 


Sub 


In 


Ex 


vMdation, a waving, or flowing, [(uafAa ceo.] 


Ad 


In 


Ob 


VHibraU, to shade ; to cast a shadow. 


Super 


Dis 


Self 


praise, to laud ; to oommend. 


Sur 


Over 


Non 


plus, more. 


Un 


En 


In 


tcanb, a sepulchre; a grave. 


Un 


Dia 


Hyper 


critical, nicely discriminating ; accurate. 


In 


£ 


Per 


vade, > to go ; to pass. 
vation, ^ the act of going. 


Iq 


£ 


Per 








ExntcisB 510. 



Inundate, to wave, or flow on, or over ; to overflow ; ed ing ion 

to overwhelm. 
Obumbrate, to overshadow ; to darken. ed ing ioQ 

Adumbrate, to shadow forth, that is, to resemble, or ed ing ioB 

sketch faintly. 
Surplus, overplus ; more than the required or speci* age 

fled amount. 
Nonplus, [to place one so thai he can do, or say] no ed ing 

more ; to confound. 
Invade, *to go into [a place with hostile iiUeniions ;] ed ing er 

to attack, to assail. 
Evasive, going, or prone to go out of [1^ iMiy, to ly nees 

avoid a direct answer, consequence, or 

conchmon,] 
Pervade, to go through, or throughout ; to enter every ed ing 

part. 



140 



JJBLklTtlCAL JUHVAL. 



Dii 
Re 
Con 
Co 

Co 
Co 
Co 



Ra 
Ex 

PreooQ 
Sub 

Ad 
Ad 
Super 



Tnm 
In 

Discern 
In 

In 
In 
Un 



Ag De . Con 



Ezxmoifc 611. 

nUeni, > leaping. 

8uUy ) to leap; tospiifig. 

eert, to vie ; to strive. 

ordinate, according to, or being in [a certam] 

order, rank or rule. 
herey i (o stick ; to cling. 
henon, ) the act of adhering, or sticking to. 
essential, necessary to being ; constituent; of 

prime importance, 
glutinate, to glue ; to cement 

IfiXERCISE 512. 



to spring back, [as a consequence from, anoe ant ed 

sometking;] hence, to proceed or 

arise from, 
to leap out, or forth [vnth joy or in ant ation ing 

triMmph ;"] hence, to triumph, 
to leap nponjconiempiuously ;] hence, ingly ation ed 

to treat ofl^nsively ; to abuse, 
to leap, or go tc^ether readily [in de- ation ative ing 
* UberaUon ;] hence, to counsel togeth- 

er ; to seek advice, 
to vie together [in confming, or ^ettZtng ed ing ation 

a plan ;] hence, to contrive ; to ar- 
range ; to plan, 
to stick, cling, or cleave to< 
sticking, or clinging together, 



Result, 



Exult, 
Insult, 
Consult, 



Concert,* 



Adhere, 

Cohesive, 

A^lutinate, to glue to, to cause to stick to. 



ent ency ently 
ly ness 
ive ion ed 



EXEECISE 513. 



Ac 
Re 



De 
Un 



Pro 
Dis 



cUoUy^ 
cover, 



Co Ex Pre empUon^ 



Af 
Re 
Col 
Pre 
Pre 



Con 

Intro 
Re 
Sub 
Ad 



In 
In 
Ob 

Ad 
Com 



fract, 
luctationj 
monish, ) 
monition, ) 



a slope, or bend, [aSy of elevated grounds.1 
to lay or spread over ; and, hence, to 

hide; to conceal, 
the act of taking, [chiefly for a price, or 

consideration,'\ 
to beat, strike or dash, 
to break. 

the act of stru^ling, or striving, 
to warn; to advise, 
the act of advising ; advice. 



* Concert is usually deduced, as above, from eon and eerfo„ [to vie.] On thm, 
however, then is Kttle agreement among etymologists. Assuming this to be the 
Uwe daivatkm, a concert of music will bo a vying together ^musical perfomMis. 



AXALTTIGAL KAKUAL. 141 

EZSBCIIX 614. 

fiecover, to cover affoin ; that is, to get under cover y ed aUe 

again ; hence, to regain. 
Disooveri to take out of the state of being covered, or ed ing able 

concealed ; to find. 
Uncover, to take off the cover; to lay bear ; to strip, ed ing s 
Exempt, to take out, or except from [a general rule, or ion ed ible 

requisition ;] to privilege. 
Afflict, to break or stnke down [tinih disease, sick* ive icm ed 

ness, distress^ cdlamUy.] 
Inflict, to strike [a hloto] upon ; hence, generally, er ed ion 

to impose a punishment or penalty. 
Refract, to break [the Une or natural course of a ray ed ive ion 

of light /] to turn from a direct course. 
Reluct, to struggle, or strive against ; hence, gener- ant antly 

ally, to show a repugnance or unwilling. 

ness. 

Exercise 515. 

Meta Para Peri phrase, mode of expression ; diction. 

Con In Ad note, ^ bom. 

Sub Re Ad nascent, > growing, or springing up ; begin- 

5 ning to be or exist. 
De Sur Pre-de cease, to go ; generally, to go fronts i, e. 

to leave off. 
Re De Pre monstrate, to show, 

i)e An Con notation, the act of noting, or recording par* 

ticularly. 
Circum Re Retro flex, } a bending ; a turning. 

Re In De fleet, y to bend ; to turn. 

Exsacisx 516. 

Metaphrase * a translation, word for, L e, accord^ tic tically 

ing to, word ; phrase for phrase ; 

a literal translation. 
Paraphrase,* to phrase or express nearly like [the ed tic tically 

expression of another ;] to explain 

by varying the expression. 
Feriphrase,* to phrase or express in a round-about ed tic tical 

way ; to employ circumlocution. 
Decease, to go [from the world ;] that is, to ed ing 

depart this life ; to die. 
Surcease, to. cease; to give over; to refrain ed iiig 

from ; to forbear. ' 

* The final « of this word is rejected, upon the tdditkm of the suffix lie, and its 
coDipoQndf. 



142 



ANALYTICAL KANXrAL. 



Demonstrate, to show or point out specially ; hence, ive ed ing 

to prove beyond doubt* 
Remonstrate, to show again ; to point out again ed ing or 

[reasons or considerations against 

a thing ;] to expostulate. 
Reflect, to turn again and again [in mind ;] ed ingly ive 

to revolve ; to meditate. 



Exercise 517. 



Con 
Pre 

Un 

Ck)m 

Dis 



Super Under 
Under Counter 
Im Un 



Ap 
Ex 



As Dis similar, like; resembling. 

Con III science, knowledge ; a collection of prio* 

ciples systematically arranged, 
saturated, excessively full ; filled completely, 
plot, plan; scheme; intrigue, 

plume, a feather ; the feather [of a shield; 

of a hU or cap ;] hence, pride, 
ambition, glory. 
Re Inter peal, to call ; to summon. 

Dis De cerpdon, the act of gathering, culling, or 

plucking. 
Cor E Ir radiation,* the act of emitting rays, [chi^t 

of Ughtfrom a c&nirp,'] 

Exercise 518. 

Dissimilar, unlike ; n6t resembling. 

Conscience, knowledge within [one^s self,] or self- 
knowledge ; hence, the faculty by 
which we judge our own thoughts, 
or actions. 

Repeal, to call back [a law, statute, sentence, 
deed;] to revoke. 

Appeal, to call, or carry [a cause from one 
judge or court to another;] to re- 
fer to. 

Excerpt, to cull, or jHck out [portions of a hook;] 
to extract ; to select. 

Discerpt, to pluck, or pull apart ; to sever or 
sunder. 

Irradiate, to send into, or diffuse rays [of Ught] 
upon ; to enlighten ; to illuminate. 

Eradiate, to send out rBiys[qf Ught ;] to beam. 

Exercise 519. 
E Un nerve, a tendon, or sinew ; hence, vigor. 

Ab Pre ominate to give omen ; to forebode. 



ity 
ious 


iously 


es 


ed 


ing 


er 


able 


1 er 


in£ 


ed 


ing 


or 


ed 


ible 


ibi 


ed 


ring 


s 


ed 


ing 


ioc 



* Radiatkm is from the Latm radiuB, aTod or staff; it is applied to a 
tod, the spoke of a wheel, a line or ray [of light,] and other things simflar. 



ANALYTICAL XAirOAL. 149 

Ofer Under Mis rate, to yalae, or estimate. 

Pel"** Trans Di lucid, > bright; shiniiig* 

later Trans Re lucent, ) shining. 

Re De En taH to cut. 

En Ig Disen noble, famous; illustrious; grand. 

Dis Ra Pre possess, to have or hold ; to 'get hold of. 

Exercise 520. 

Enervate, to deprive of nerve, i. e. to weaken, or en- ed ing s, 

feeble. 
Abominate, to make, or take [HI] omen from, i. e. to ed ing ion ^ 

depreeate as ominous ; to detest. 
Pellucid, shining through ; clear ; transparent. ity ness 

Retail, to cut again and again ; that is, into ed ing er 

pieces ; hence, to sell in 'small quanti- 
ties. 
Detail, to cutofrpartbypart[anarrafe*uc;] hence, ed ing er 

to relate particularly. 
Entail^ to cut intof ; to cut off [all but special ed ing ment 

heirs to an estaU ;] to ^ unalterably. 
Prepossess, to have, or take, [chiefly, an impression, or ed ing i(m 

opinion] beforehand ; to pre-occupy ; to 

bias. 

Exercise 521. 

D« For Of fend, "j to strike, [chiefly, in defence, or in re- 

I turn ;] hence, to ward ; to parry. 

Dp Of Inof fensive, | striking, or parrying; tending to strike 

J or parry. 

Ex CJom Super purgation, the act of purifying. 

Dis Un Over quiet, still ; calm ; peaceful. 

Re In Dis tort, ^ a turn, or twist ; a twisting [out of <jbtf 

I right way ;] Jhence, a wrong. 

Dis Con Re tortion, | the act of turning, or twisting. 

In Con' De torsion, J the act of turning, or twisting. 

Suf Bene Male flee, a deed ; the a.ct of doing. 

ExERciSB 522. 

Defend, to strike, or ward off [ewZ ;] to repel ; to ed ant ing 

protect. 
Offend, to strike against*; that is, to attack ; to ed er ress 

hurt or wound [thefeeRngs,] 
Expurgate, to purge out ; to free from impurities. ed ion oiy 

* Pel is bat another form of per. See Rule II., page 115b 
t In this, the literal lense, the wotd is now Unolete. 



144 



MXVmCAL UAJtVAh, 



in« 



Retort^ to tum, or throw back ; to return or an« ed log er 

Bwer forcibly [a charge or argument^ 
Distort, to turn, or twist apart from, or out of ed 

\ihe way or proper shape ;] to vfrest ; 

to pervert. 
Suffioe, to aot, or do under [the character of icnt ieocy ed 

another y] henoe, to do what is equal ; 

to satisfy. 
Benefice, a well doing ; that is, a good deed ; a ial ent ed 

benefit. 
Malefice, an ill doing ; that is, an evil deed ; a do- iatq ient ienca 

ing ill ^ff uorcery y] hence, witchery. 



Exercise 523. 



Ab Re Dis 



Ab Re 

Con Dis 

Con Dis 

En Peri 

A Pre 

A Com 

Co Under 



Dis 
As 
Pre 

Par 

Counter 
De 
Re 



solve, 1 
solution, J 



solution, 

sent, 

senstotif 

vailf 

partment, 

agent. 



to loose ; to separate ; to melt ; to 
free [from doubt ;] to explain. 

the act of solving. 

to feel 5 to perceive. 

the act of feeling, or perceiving by 
the senses. 

a work ; an operation. 

to be well ; to be efficacious. 

the act of parting or dividing. 

one who acts [in place of anoiher ;] 
a factor. 



Exercise 524. . 

Aboolvey to loose or free from [guHt ; an oath or ed ing er 
promise y] hence, to pardon ; to re- 
lease ; to acquit. 

Resolve, to loosen again or separate [the parts of edly able ent 
a compound y] hence, to analyze ; 
also, to free from doubt, £. e. to decide. 

Dissolve, to loosen completely [the parts of any * ent able'*' ed 
thing y] hence, to melt ; to sever ; to 
disunite. 

Consent, to think with or like [ano^^r y] to agree aneousient ed 
with ; and hence, to grant or allow. 

Assent, to think according to [whai is propo- ingly ation ator 
sed y] that is, to admit to be true ; to 
permit ; to yield. 

Periergy, a working round [needlessly,}!, e. need- 
less caution, or diligence. 

Parergy, a work beyond [ithat is required y] a 
superfluity. 



• Aho, dimoMbU. 











In 


Ex 


Dis 


Ctf^O^y 


Im 


Over 


Com 


patient^ 


Im 


Dis 


Com 


passionate. 


Mis 


Un 


Self 


taught, 


Counter 


Over 


Out 


poise, 


9m 


Besus 


Exsus 


ciiate* 


Con • 


He 


DiBoon tmuCf 


Im 


Dis 


Re-im 


htrsCf* 



AfrixmcAL KAinTii.. 145 

▲▼•S, tohee&cachvm^lehUfyfinilU produc- able mented 

Uan of advaniage ; Jj to ^ of weight 

or influence ; to profit. 
Prevail, to be efficacious before, or beyond ing ent meot 

lathers sj to predominate. 

525. 

to fault; to blame; to censure. 
I feeling, or suffering [pfdnwiih- 
h out complairU,'] 
) affected by passion. 

iniitructed. 

to balance. 

to call ; to sommon. 

to hold, 

a hide or skin [converted mto a 
' money iog/[ a purse. 

ExE&cisa 526. 

Compassion, to feel with, or riiare in [t/^ eufer^ «te atdy able 

vngs of <moiker;'\ to sympatluxe ; 

to pity. 
Impaasion, to throw passion into, or afleot with ate ated ed 

warmth of feeling. 
Dispassion, freedom from passicm; coolness; ate atalyed 

apathy. 
Counterpoise, to weigh against ; to counterbalance, ed ing es 
Resuscitate, to call up agiun; to revive; to re- ed ive jda 

new. 
Continue, to hold or ke^ together [mihoui m- ance ed otts 

temt^^tUme/l hence, to prolong, to 

remain. 
Retinue, [a body of persons] held back, or re* a 

tained, as attendants; a train of 

persons. 
Disburse, to take out of the purse, that is, to lay ed ing ment 

out ; to spend. 

Exercise 527. 

Im Com Re plyf, > to fold ; to lay together ; to bend. 
Im Ex Sup pUcate, ) to fold ; to lay together ; to bend. ^ 

* Burse, in the simple fonn, Ibbow applied to a pnUic place «r building for money 
or mercantile transactions. 

i The radical ply, and the kindred forms grouped with it, are from puco, [ffXlxu,] 
nJBOATuu, to fbld <»r knit ; jdy and the other fonns in the seoond group, come ^tm 
VUG, [irXcw,] runvu, to fiu. 

19 



IM 



AJULYTDCiX. UAXUAU 



Im Ap 



pUcatUm, 



Im 


Ex 


Sup 


Re-sup 


Com 


Sup 


Com 


Incom 


Com 


De 


Dis 


Per 




Imply, 

Comply, 

Reply, 

Implicate, 

Explicate, 
8u{^oate, 

Implicit, 
Ezplioit, 

Supply, 



the act of foUiog, or la3riiig. to* 

gether. 
folded, 
to fill. 

that which fills, 
filled. * 

the act bf filling, 
to put in disorder ; to confuse. 



ExxRCiss 528. 

to fold in, or contain, [as a canse^ ed edly ing 

quenccy tohat is not expressed in 

words;"] to involve, 
to fold, or bend [one^s self in conform- ant able *menl 

ity] with [ajiother ;] hence, to yield 

to ; to agree with, 
to fold back, or lay out [something by ed ing cation 

way of answer;] hence, to an- 

swer ; to respond. 
to fold in, or involve [one, chiefly m ion ed 

criminal or improper transactions ;] 

to prove one to be concerned in. 
to unfold, or explain [the sense or ive ion 

meaning of an author.] 
to fold, or bend [the knees] under [in 

prayer or worship ;] hence, to pray ; 

to implore ; to beseech, 
folded, or wrapped in, [as faith or eon- 

fidence ;] hence, entire ; unlimited, 
laid out, or unfolded ; hence, plain ; 

clear ; free from doubt or uncer- 

tainty. 



IDg 



ed cry ion 



Exxmciss 529. 



ing 



ary 



to fill under, or from the bottom; ed 

hence, to fill up what is wanting ; 

to fiimish ; to provide with. 
Supplement, that which fills, or makes up [a defi- at 

ciency;] what is added to supply 

defects. 
Complement, that which fills up, or makes [even] al 

with ; hence, whatever completes ; 

also, the full sum or quantity. 



* Comptiment, wfaioh is formed by adding this suffix to the word comply, ii to bf 
smnfiilly dhtingidiAidd fix>m complement in Uie next exercise. 



.ASAimCAL lUMVAL. 



147 



Implement^ that which fills or supplm [the haind a 

rf the workman in Uk6 exercise of 

hie adUng y] hence, a tool or utensil . 
Conqplete, tofilliiporinake{eDen] withfa^sn ed !ve menl 

standard ;} hence, to perfect; to 

finish. 
Bepleto^ entirely filled ; abounding with. ive ively ion 

DepletKKi, the act of taking out of the state of be- 
ing full [ofhlood;} blood-letting. 
Disturb, to put in great disorder ; to discom: ed ance er 

pose ; to disarrange ; to put out of 

place. 
Perturby to discompose [fj^ mmd'] thoroughly ; ator ation ed 

to disquiet greatly. 

Exercise 530. 

Mis IHs Un allied, bound to another [hy cotenaM or 

affimXyJ] 

Efn Im Disem bitter, biting, or sharp [to <^ to^ y] hence, 

painful, distressing. 

Dis Over Un burden, to load ; to encumber. 

In Un Over cautious, wary; heedful; circumspect. 

Con Re Sub duplicate,* two-fold; double. 

Re Pre Self examination, the act of weighing, or testing by a 

balance. 

Dis Un Self interested, being between, or in the midst [of 

affairs /] i. e. concerned; en- 
gaged in. 

£n Inter Disen tangle, to tie, or twist together intricately. 

Exercise 531. 

Disally, to take out of the state of being allied. 

.MiisaUy, to bind, or associate improperly. 

Incautious, not wary ; heedless. 

.Oooduplicate, to double, or fold together. 

Reduplicate, to redouble ; to augment. 

Pre-examine, to weigh, test, or try beforehand. 

Dinnterested, not concerned, or not having an inter- 
est in. 

Intertangle, to tangle between ; to interlock. 

Disentangle, to take out of the state of being tan- 
gled, or twisted together. 



ed 


ing es 


ed 


ance 


ly 


ness 


ed 


mg ion 


ive 


ion ed 


ed 


ing aticm 


ne« 


Uy 


ed 


ing es 


ed 


mir es 



En 



Exercise 532. 
Inter Un twine, to twist; to wiiid round. 



* DupUeaUf here treated u a primitive, is a cempoimd of iuot two, and ff&cM 
:pfic»]tolbld. ' 



.148 



AKAVrtKAJt utimti^ 



En 

Mw 


n 

Over 


B« 

Uo 


matohedy 


Sht 


Mit 


Fow 


name, 


Ir 

Semi 

Sub 


III 


Extra 

Ex 

Mis 


regular, 
oeseous, 
tutor, 



Ck>unter Over Out vote, 



to light 

preeented as equal ; made equal 

[in anf respwi.] 
the word fay which any thmf ii 

known, or called, 
according to rule. 
Umy; made, or partaking ofhooe. 
one who looks after, or takes 

charge of [the education of ca^ 

oihcr /] a teacher, 
to express a wish or preference, 

[c^^jf, in As election of men to 

i^kef and m paeaing laws,} 



ExEEcisB 533. 



Illumine, 



to give, or throw light into or upon ; to ation ant aim 

make clear. . 
to light again ; to rekindle. ed 

an over, or additional name [in respect, ed 

chie^y, to the one given at hc^^Hsm.} 
to name wrong. , ed 

not according to rule, law or established ily 

order, 
without bones. 
to educate, or instruct improperly ; to ad 

teach amiss. 
tSountervote, to vote against, or oppositely. ed 



' Reluminei 
Surname, 

Misname, 
Irregular, 

Bxosseous, 
Mistutor, 



mges 
ingea 

inges 



IBg 

inges 



ExzxciSE 534. 



Ob 
Ob 



Re 
Re 



Con fund,} 
Con tefe, ) 



to beat ; to bruke. 

to beat; to bruise. 

the quality, or state of being aUsb 

running. 

to set a value upon; toegliniatew 

to enslave. 

to pledge, or promise. 

answerable, or liable lo t 



In Dis Non ability, 

Counter Un De current, 

Dis Mis Self esteem, 

En Disen Disin thrall, 

De Re Corre spond, > * 

Re Ine Unre sponsible, \ 

Ejueacisx 535. 

Obtuse, beaten against, [as the point or edge rf ness ly ion 

a weapon ji] hence, blunt; dull [w 

mindJl 
Retund, to beat back Uhe edge or pdntjl i. e. to ed ing s 

blunt; to dull. 
Contuse, beaten, or bruised tqgether ; brayed. ion ed ing 



Diaesteem, not to esteem; to di^ike, or disregard, ed 



mg a 



ikMJkLTHCAL MJUIVJUU 



f>npoii4 to h% depiired of the {dedge or proinb^ tncy cndy iii|^ 

[afoMf iking /] henoe» to lose h^ ; 

to be disheartened, 
KMpon4 to-proial8e Again^ or in retura; and enl ad ii^ 

hence, generaUy, to answer, or re* 

ply to. 
Response, an answer back ; a reply. es ire 

Correspond, to answer together, or one another, [at enoe ing 

by lettert y] also, to agree, or be con- 

gruous. 



ory 
ent 



In Di Re vest, 

Re £n Re-en &vce, 

Re En Re-en graft, 

Ac Fore Inter knowledge, 

Pur Re Ixrter view, 

At Con Dis temper, 

A De Conde scendy \ 

A De Conde scenaum, j 



£xsftci8i: 536^ 

to clothe, «r attire« 

to compel ; to drive. 

to make a cut or incisi(Hi, [hOo a tretf 

to insert a scion, er sJwotJ] 
that which is known ; leamii^ ; !»• 

formation, 
sight; proiq)ect. 
to time, or season \an% iMng ;] to 

adapt to the occasion ; hence, gen* 

erally> to moderate, or modify, 
to |o or come, {dbi^jr, upward;] to 

nse; to mount; tocIimU 
the act of gdng, or coming. 



£ssRci8E 637. 

Invest, to clothe in or with [power ;} hence, ed ment iturs 

also, to surround, [as a city under 

siege.] 
Divest, to und^e ; to strip or deprive of ed ing ftura 

[power or prii>ilege.] 
Purview, the view before, or a forward view : s 

that is, the scope, limit, or design 

[of a statute,] 
Interview, view between, or among [persons ;] s 

i. e. a meeting; a conference. 
Attemper, to temper to, or according to [some ment ate ed 

rule or standard;] to regulate; 

to modify. 
Contemper, to temper together ; to moderate ament ation ate 

[by intermixture ;] hence, to suit ; 

to qualify. 
i)]8temper, to take out ofthe state of being prc^ ature ance ed 

erly tempered ; to disorder ; to 

dertx^ (JMy or nimd.\ 



OoBfimofnif to oooft down with, or to a brel 6< ia/jty 
with [oMotibery] to stoop or yield 
to that which is infericv. 

Aeknowledga^ to make, or permit to be knowii^ ed ing 
thati%toown; toooofiMS. 



SECTION XXL 

Exercise 538. 

A Sym Aoti En paffiy, feeling; passion. 

im Ke AGs Re^si print, to press, BMrk, or stamp laKras or 

characters. 

Un Co lu Bab equals the same in sny respect ; alike. 

A I>ys En . Anti mimy, law; statute; ral&. 

Pre Fore Mis Ad jnd^nent.* ) the set df judging; a decision. 

Ad Di Pre Unad ju<Beatedf ,$ judged; determined.; decided. 

Be En Mis JX» tmst, to put confidence in ; to credit. 

ExsBciSE 639. 

Apathy,f state of bemg without feeMng. , edcsl 

Antipatl^ifr feeling against ; dislike; aversion. es etical -oas 

Sympathjyf feeling with another, L e. fellow fediag ; com- eS etio i^ 

pairion. 

Antinomy, against law, i. e. against the (^ligation of the an anism es 

I moral law ; also, law opposed to law. 

Prejudge, to judge beferehand. ed ing . meat 

Adjudicate, to judge to; to sddeem ; to sentence. ed ing ion 

Prejudice, jud^ent before or without examination. ed iaf ially 

BCstrust, to oeUeve wrong of any (me ; to be without fnl fulness in|^ 

confidence m* a persouv 

Distrust, to discredit ; to be suspicnms oL ed ing fully 

ExEBCtSE 540. 

Bis Un Mis Be ]ike« to be {leased with | to approve ; aoD- 

liar. 
Mis After In Re-in state, to set forth the condition of ai^thisg; 

to describe ; to place, 
to pledge ; to bind, 
to make firm, or stable ; to settle, 
a cover for the face ; a dimise. 
to cover with donds ; to obscufe ; te 
darken. 

' ' " • — — » 

• More correctly, tbocvh iiMS fivqnentiy, writton;ti4g'«iiieiit See Rnle IL 
f Vpaa adding the sn&as, exospl ss^ dvp the misl y sf this wocd. 



En 


Pre-en 


Re-en Disen 


stilish, 


E 


Re-e 


Pre-e Co-e 


IHs 


Un 


Be Im 


mask. 


He 


En 


In Over 





AHALTTICAL UAXUAL. 161 

EXULCISK 541. 

Didike, to be displeased with ; not to approve. ed ing neaa 

Unlike, notnnular; difierent. ly seas Hhood 

Miaetate, to set forth wron^ ; to represent erroneously, rnent ing ed 

Baifiwtata, to put in poaaeasion again ; to place in a fM> menting ed 

mer situation. 

Diaengpige, to take out of the state of being pledged^ or ed ecbeaa ment 

bound. 

Eatabliah, to make firm ; to found permanently. . ment ed er 

Dismask, to deprive of^ or strip ofi, a mask. ed ing 

Exercise 542. 

Mk Out Re Over measure, to ascertain the <limwnMrwa of any 

thing. 

Bis Em Re Over people, to fill, or supply with inhabitants. 

Out Re Under Over value, to esdmato the worth of ; to ap- 

prize. 

Ad Co Ex De hortation, the act of entreating, or ur^^ ; 

persuasion. 

Sub CircUm In Ad jacent, lymg; situate. 

A4 Con Per Ab jure^ to swear. 

Al Col Ob Cucum UgaU^ to bind; to tie. 

Exercise 543. 

Exhorti to urge out, i. e. to entreat warmhr. ation atire atory 

Dehprt, to urge [one] from, or against [a thing ;] to dis- ed er atoiy 

suade. 
A^ure, to swear, or cause to swear to ; to charge with atioa ed er 

an oath. 
Abjure, to swear oflC or £rom, i. e. to renounce upon ed * ing ation 

oath ; to disclaim. 
Perjure, to swear through, i. e. in opposition to, [truth ;] y ed er 

hence, to swear falsely. 
CoDJure,* to swear together ; to urce, or call upon with ed er atioii 

the ademnity of an oath. 
ObHgato, to hmd [by promiie, seroicef or duty.] km oiy ed 

Exercise 544. 

Sug Con IK .In gestion, the act of bearing, or canying. 

Pro De Ref Con tectum^ the act of covering. 

Re Ante Out Mis number, to count ; to calculate. 

Re Un Em Re-em brace, to draw closely together; to bind; 

to dasp. 

£f De Out Anti face, the general form; the front; sur- 
face; countenance. 

. *^ Copfjure, with the accent on the first syllable, is used to signify, to pfaoUoe 
witchcralit, or enchantment 
t Note here, that Re is frivative ; retectum signifyuig the act of 



Sx Cam Flo Beoom poundf tojpat, place or lar* 
Ad Unad Re-td Sub omed, fitted out; decked! 

ExKRciSE 545. 

Suggtst, ta beVy or i^ace under [view or considenUkm ;] to ion i^e edi 

indicate, to bint. 
Digettr tobear or set apart in order; to anunge; to bear ed e^ ibit 

apart, or diMolTe, aa food, in the stomach. 
Congest, to bear, cany, or heap to gether ; tocoUect togetb- ed iaft ' ibitf 

er in a mass. 
Protect, to place a covering, or shield before ; to shd^ ; to hre orsfaip ed 

guard. 
Detect, to take outiof the state of being covered or hid ; to ion ed in|^ 

uncover; to find out. 
Unbrace, to take out of the state of being bound ; to loosen ; ed ing 

to unclasp. 
Embrace, to bind, or clasp in [the arms ;] also, to hold ; to ment ed er 
comprehend. 

Exercise 546^. 

IMice, to deprive of iSiee, form or figure ; to deform. ed kg^meHI 
Efiace, to rub out, or destroy entirely; tonaar complete- ed ing 

Expound, to place, or lay out [to vie^ ;] to explain. er mg ed 

Compound, to put together; to combine ; to mix ; to adjuat. able ing er 
Inopound^ to lay beforet i. e. to present. ed ing er 

Adbm, to fit to [handsomely ;] hence, to beautify ; to ed ing ment 

decorate. 
Suborn, to fit, at prepare under [cover ^ i. e. secretly, j9€r- ed ing adoa 
• 9om to become false witiussesi\ hence, to 

bribe ; to induce one to peijure himsdf. 

Exercise 547. 

Betro De Re Dis grade, > a step; a rank or chigiee. 

Di E Pro Trans gress, \ to step; to take steps; toga. 

Con Ee Sur ' Super vive, to live. 

De Ar Disar Re^ar range, a row ; rank ; to set in order. 

Sur Ar £ Di repUoih the act of seizing or snatching* 

De Re In Disin cttne, to bend or lean. 

Bene Male Satis Dissatis faction,* the act of doing, or makmg* 

Exercise 548. 

Degrade, to deprive of rank ; to cast down firom a ment ing ingly 

higher state ; to disgrace. 

Progress; to step, or go forward ; to advance. ive ively ional 

Digress, to ste|) aside, or stray [from the subject ;] to ed ional ive 

deviate. 
— - ^ ■ . ,1 , " J 

* Faction is often i^Iied to a body of partiBans, i. e. men doiTig, or acting in <^ 
^eritktt to othem. 



ANiJjmCAL lUMVAL. 



U> 



Tran^greai, to step over [tAe low or UmU ;] to v^late. ed or 
SnrviTe, to live over, or beyond [a given Hm^ or al ed 

event ;] to outHve. 
AeviTe, to lire, or cai»e to five again ; to re-azd- al ify 

mate. 



iooal 
or 



Convive, 
Aiiange, 

Derange, 

Surrqft, 

Incline, 

Decline, 

Saiisfact, 



Im Com 

Im Per 

£ Im 

De Im 

De £ 

An Fro 

Fto £ 

E Con 



£xsRCi8E 549. 

to live together, i. e. to feast togetlier. 

to range according to [tome rule or stand- 
ard ;] to dispose in order. 

to take oat of tine state of being arranged ; 
to disorder [d^e intdUct] 

to seize, orsnatcb imder [cover or eoncealr 
mevU ;] t. e, to effect by stealth. 

to bend, or lean in, or towards ; to tend to- 
wards. 

to bend, or tnm fiom, ot downward ; to 
ainkf or fall ; to refuse. 

to do ht^iat is deemed;] sufficient; to 
gniarv ; to settle. 



ial. iality ed 
ment ed ing 

xnent ed ing 

ion itious itioualy 

ationed ing 

atkm atoiy able * 

oiy only ive 



£ZE]ICI8E 560. 



Per 
Re 

Pro 

£ 



Trans 
Imper 



miUe, 
manentt 



Supere minmt^ 
Sub merge. 



Sub Im 
Re De 



De 
Bi 



Re 

An 



merstont 
naunee, 

nuneiationt 

numeration. 



to alter, or change. 

abiding, staying, or enduing. 

jutting, or hanging. 

to dip ; to pmnge ; to ovei^ 

the act of dipping. 

to ten sodiething new ; to re- 
port. 

the act of tellmg someAii^ 
new, or declaring. 

the act of counting or caleakr 
ting. 



£xEaci8E 551. 



Immutable, not possible to be changed. ly^ it^ 

Commute, to change with [one ano£er,] i. e. to exchange i ative atively able 

to siu)stitute. 
Transmute, to change across, t. e. from one substance into er abiBty ed 

another, 
^rmute, to change through and through, or complete- ed ing addn 

ly [one thing for another;] to barter. 
Permanent, alnding. or endmring through [a 2on^^m6;] cy ce ly 

lastins; durable. 
Immanent, abiding In, i. e. inherent; intrinsic. cy 

Imminent, hanging upon, or over, i. e. near ; threaten- ce 

ing. 
Eminent, jutting out [beyond others ;] hence, exalted, ce ly cjr 
Ffominent, juttmg, or stretching fixrth ; hence, protube- ce ly ey 

rant; eminent. 

20 



154 



AVALYTICAL KJMtfAL 



EXEECMC 652. 

Demerge, to plunge down; to overwhelm. ed ing 

Emerge, to t^e out of the state oi being merged; to «iice eiioy cid 

rise above the surface ; to issue. 

Immerse, to dip into any fluid ; to plunge into [affairs,'] ed ing ion 

i. e. to involve. 

Denounce, to declare openly against ; to menace. ment ed er 

Announce, to publish; to make known to. ed ing « 

Annunciate, to oring news; to annonnce. ed ion or 

Enunciate, to tell out ; to utter ; to pronounce. ed ive ory 

Pronounce, to raeak ferth, or openly ; to utter. able ed ing 

Renounce, to declare against, i. o. reject [tahat has cnce ed ing er 

heem hdd or heUeved.'] 

Enumerate, to coxmt out or reckon things separately; to ive ed ing 

tell or mention one by one. 

« ExxEciSE 563. 



Se 


Sine 


Asse 


En 


Re 


Over 


En 


De 


Dis 


In 


As 


En 


Re 


A 


Con 


Con 


Re 


Dis 


Ob 


Con 


Bt> 



Counterse 

Dis 

Disen 

Re-as 

Ab 

Super 



cure, 

gorge, 

thrcme, 

sure, 

stringe, 

strain, 

strictioih 



Lre, 

ringe, ) 

rain, V 

ricUoth 3 



care ; charge or trust. 

to swallow greedily. 

a royal seat ; a chair of state. 

certain ; not liable to faiL 

to bind or press. 

to bind; to hold; to stretch. 

the actof bindii^. ' 



Sinecure, 

Secure, 

«rge, 



Exercise 554. 

[an office affording emolument'] without charge s 

or care, 

without, or fiee from care ; safe. ed i^ ly * 

to swallow greedily ; to glut. ment ing ed 

to deprive of the royal seat, t . e. of sove- ment ed iz9 



AfSQie, 
Insure, 



ed 
ed 



edly 
er 



anoe 
ance 



Astringe, 

Constringe, 

Constrict, 

Restrict, 

Constrain, 

Restrain, 

Distrain, 



Mm Ac 
Con Ex 
Be Dim 



to make sure ; to render confident, 
to make sure [agiomt loss ;] to secure for a 
consideration. 

Exercise 555. 

to bind to; to press or force the parts to- ent ency ed 

gether. 
to bind together ; to compress, 
to bind together ; to contract. '' 

to bind or hold back [to some pointy] t. e. to 

limit, 
to bind or hold forcibly ; to urge strongly, 
to bind, hold, or keep back ; to check, 
to take out of the state of being held [as jprop^ 

erty ;] to wring from. 



ion 
ive 

able 

ed 

ed 



ency mg 
ed or 
ively ion 

ed t 
ing t 
ing ablft 



Re 
Dis 
Ex 



Exercise 556. 

Dis count, to number; to reckon; totA 

to separate, 
to separate. 



Se 



cem, 
crtU\ 



•A 



▲JUXxnoAL KAjnru.. 185 

Be Con Re Ex coct^ topreptrebylieat; to cook. 

Un Counter De Be chazm, to oelight or enchant* 

Ke Bene Fro IMsprofit, to make, 

Ag Con Se Dis gregaU^ to flock, herd or assemble. 

ExxmciBE 557. 

Aeooonty to connt to, i. e. to render account; to calcu- ed aUe ant 

late; to nve reasons. 
XHKonnt, to coont o3* from [the principal fum,] ». e. to ed aUe ing 

deduct as interest. 
Secrete, to separate [from nght^"] u e. to conceal ; to ed cy ory 

separate [jlvid matter from the hloadJj 
Excrete, to separate [refuse matter from the ahmetUs^ ion ive ory 

or the tlooa.j 
Discreet,* having power to separate [between right and ly ionf ionaryt 

' wrong in conduct ;] wise ; judicious. 
I^scem, . to separate [hy sight or in Tiun^,] i. e. to see ed ing ment 

distinctly ; to c^Ksriminate. 
£xceni, to 9^}^9ix^X% [from the hody through the jpares;"] ed in . s 

'to strain out. 
Concern, to separate specially, [cm an o&/ec< (/re^or^;?;] edlying ment 

hence, to interest. 

Exercise 558. 

Concoct, to cook together, or prepare [food in the ion ive ed 

stomach ;] to di^st ; to prepare. 
Decoct, to prepare by boiling, [cMefty, medicinal ible ed ion 

herbs.] 
'Profit, to make forward, i. e. to advance ; to gain able less ed 

or cause to gain. 
Kefit, to make again [suitable^] i. e. to repair. ed ing 

Congregate, to flock, or gather together. ion ional lonaHm 

Aggregate, to flock, or gather to [one assemblage ;] to ive ly ion 

collect into one sum, or mass. 
Segregate, to take from the flock or assemblage ; to ed ing ion 

separate from others. 

ExEECiSE 559. 

Be Ee Mia Under take, to lay hold of; to receive. 

Super De Ke Ad vise^ to see, or look. 

At Con Dis Ke tribute^ to sive ; to ]rield ; to grant. 

lie Con Dis As sent, to feel, or tmnk. 

Im Com Per Incom plex, to plait; fold; also, folded. 

In Out Over Counter work, to tabor ; to be in motion. 

Sue Dis Pro / Pre dnet, girt ; surrounded. , 

^ * We have, alio, discrete, which is bat another form of this wofd, and whieh^ as 
a verb, aignifies, to septtr&te; as an adjective, distinct, disfune^ 
t Upon addfaig this MrfBXf drop one tdrtetadk»L 



■UB AlULrnDAL hahuau 

EZERCICB 560. 

Supervise, to louk over, or oversee ; to superintend. ion oc •! 

Devite, to see, or perceive clearly [the mode ojeffeciimg ed ing er 

a purposed i. e. to invent ; to contrive. 
Eevise, to see, or look over again; to review; to amend, al ed km 
Advise, to see, or cause to see to; to deliberate ; to ad- ment able edlj 

monish ; to inform. 
Attribute, to g^ve, or yield to [one, as Ms dtte;] to as- able ive ed 

cribe; tomipute. 
t Contribute, to give with, or in ccmrnxm witb [otkerg ;] to ory . ive or 

aid. 

' Exercise 561. 

Distribute, to give, or asfflgn separately ; to divide ively iveness able 

among many. 
Retribute, to give, or pay back [goad or evil ;] to re- ivo ory ion 

quite. 
Resent, to feel again, or in return [ck^fly an in-' ment ive ingly 

suit or tnjur^J] 
Consent, to feel ana think with, i. e. the same as aneoos lent ed 

[another:] to allow ; to concur. 
Dissent, ' to feel ana think difierently I from at^ aneous lent • Ions 

other,] i. e. to disagree. 
Assent, to feel [favorably] to or towards ; to con- ingly atioi^ er 

cede; to yield. • 

ExEKciSE 562. 

Complex, folded, or knit together ; composite. ity ly wn 

Implex, folded in, i. e. intricate. ion 

Berplex, to fold, or wind llurough and throught i. e. to ed ity ednoM 

make intricate ; to embarrass. 
Counterwork, to work against, i. e. to counteract. ed ing s 

Succinct, girt,orboundunder[cZ(MsZy, OS a garment/] ]^ neaa 

hence, brief; concise. 
Product, • girt for [action ;] ready ; fully prepared. 
Precinct, girt rouod folly, or that tokieh girds, i. e. a 

limit, or boundary. 

Exercise 563. 

Demi Hemi Semi In* sphere, a round body ; a globe. 
Con £x Para Sub centric, placed, or bein^ at ^e centre. 
Ap Com Re Disap probation, the act of proving, or tiying. 
Con Pro Mispro Dispro fess^ to declare; to own; to acknowl< 

edge. 



Ap Over Under Dis prize,j ) to take [at a certain value.] 

Ap " Com Enter Re priscj $ to take. 

Km De . Diseib Re-em hark, a barge, boat, or vessel.' 



01 /lurp^e IS to plaes in a sphere. 
Prize and prise both, it is here aaBmied, ooms to us, Ihfoneh prts, past pait^ 
if the fVenohprMiirf,ftmth«l«tm]^rajUi^ 



AKALTTIG4U. KAMOAt. 



m 



EzBBCiSE 564. 

CoBceotrOy to draw to a oommon centre ; to come to a point* 

Eccentric, out of the centre ; oift of, or deviating froBi reg- 
ularity in conduct. 

Patacei^c, [not eqwiUy distanf] item the centre, i. e. devi- 
ating from a circular form. 

Approbate, to try, or test [vnth satisfaction ;'\ to approve; 
to commend. 

Comprobate, to prove with, or to agree with [anothtr] in 
proving; to concur in testimony. 

Reprobate, to prove against; to reject; to abandon. 

Confess, to own, or avow with, or in presence of^ [any 
one.] 

Exercise 565. 

Apprisse, to take, or assume [cuofa certain valuc^] i. e. 
to value, (»r set a value upon. 

Apprise* to take, or bear [infimnation or notice] to, t. e. 
to inform ; to notify. 

C<Hnprise, to take toge^r, i. e. to embrace or compre- 
hend. 

Reprise, to take back or retake. 

Enterprise, to take in [hand to do,"} i. e. to undertake ; to 
attempt. 

Surprise, to take, or seize over or during [the very act,"] al ingly ed 
i. e. to take unawares ; to astonish. 

Eoibaik, put [ane^s self or c^iersj on [hoard of] a ves- ed ing atxA 
sel ; hence, to enter mto any thing involv- 
ing risk. 

Exercise 566. 



ateatknie 
al ally iqr 


al 




ed ing 


OFy 


ed ing 


ion 


ed ing 
ed mg 


er 
ion 


ed er 


wm 


ed iBg 




al ed 


iot 


al ed 
ed ing 


er 



Ex Dis 
Ex Bb 



Aiui IMa 

De Sub 

Ad Com 

A Re 



Contradis 
Indis 



Para 

Col 

Inter 

Sur 



Misdis 
Counterdis 



Cataf 
Inter 
Im 
Dis 



tingtdsh, ' 
tincttoHf 



lysis, 
Imeation, 
mix, 
mount. 



to puncture or mark 

with punctures, 
the act of puncturing or 

marking with puno* 

tures. • 
separation, or diastdutioii. 
the act of making lines, 
to mingle, 
to rise or ascend. 



ExE&ciSE 567. 



Exiinguishi to erase, or strike out by puncturing; and, ed able ment 
thefice, generally, to put out; to quench; 
to destroy. 

acooidi&gly, the two forms apprize and apprise, having each the same literal sense, 
but in ttkea applications widely different If this asramption be coirect, apprize and 
appraise will not, as is usually thought, be ^fierent fomis of the same word, bat 
words of different derivation with the same signification. 

* Apprise, to inform, is often written, appria^, 

t Ctog, ia C ef a f y w s, is intSBsiye. 



IW JkXALtncn, MAXVAL. 

§ 

Extinct, erased by punctiires ; thence, pat 01^; ion me 

quenched ; beinc at an end. 
DSstrngnish, to separate from others by plain marks, i, e. able isg ed 

to discern ;' to signalize. 
Distinct, set apart by special marks or 8iffns,i.«.diGf6r- nets ly ive 

ent ; separate ; clearly nnluce. 
Analyze, to loosen, or take apart \a comwmnd ;] to re- ed er ' atioft 

solve a compound into its elements. 
Paralyse, to loosen, or xmbrace completely [^neroM;] ed ing tic* 

hence, to unnerve ; to destroy the power 
' of action. 

Dialyms, the loosening or dissolving [a diphthong ;] 

' also, the mark that indicates this. 

Interline, to line or place lines between [other Unes»] ed arf ationf 



Exercise 568. 



Op 

Jn 

Re 

Re 

Re 

Bis 

As 



Im 
Re 
In 
In 
Ef 
In 
Con 



Ex 

Ac 

Ac 

Ac 

Inter 

Inter 

Dis 



Re 

Ex 

Dis 

Con 

Pre 

Con 

Disai 



qwre, ) 
qmsmon, > 
auest, ) 
fulgent, 
seminate, 
sociate, 

Exercise 



to fight; to strive. 

to seek or search. 

the act of seeking or searching. 

to seek or search. 

shining; dazzling. 

to sow; to spread. 

to company. 



Oppugn, to fight or war against, [chi^y opimom 

and doctrines ,*] to oppose. 
Impugn, to fight or carry the fight into [one^s mo- 

Hves or doctrines;] to attack. 
Expugn, to fight out, i. e. to conquer ; to take by 

assault. 
Repugn, to fight again, or against ; to oppose, or 

resist. 
Inquire, to search into ; to ask about. 
Inquisitt • to search into ; to ask. 
Require, to seek, or ask again [/or anytki»g daitn^ 

ed,€u right, due^ or needful,'] 
Requisite, asked, or required [as necessary S\ 

Exercise 570. 

Acquire, to seek [to gef] to [one's self] t. e. to gain. 
Acquisite, gained by. search. , 

Disquisition, the act of searching thoroughly [a given 

subject ;] a systematic inqmry or dis* 

cussion. 
JUfidge, to blaze or shine again and again; to ent entlyeiioe 

shine with great bmliancy. 



ancy ant atka 

ed ing ation 

able ed ation 

ant antly ance 

y ent able 

ive ion or 

ed able meat 

ly ness ory 



ment ed ing 
ion ive ively 



* Upon addmg tie, drop the final lettexs se, of Paralyse, 

f The Bnai e oi interUne-, is not to be omitted be£oire tin aoffizM w «nd oliiii. 



ANALYTICAL MANUAL. 



IM 



kllRilge, ' to blaze or shine out ; to emit or send ed ing 

forth brightness or splendor. 

jLuodf to be a companion to. ate able ateship 

Consociate, to become a mate or companion with. ion ional ed 

J)is$ocit not, [or not disposed to &e,] a companion al able ate 

or mate ; being separate or alone. 

Exercise 571 
Con Sub Inoon Ob sequent, "j following. 
Con Sub Incon £x secuHve^ I following, or tending to follow. 
Per Pio £x Unex seeuted, | followed. 

£n Pur sue, I to follow [in law ;] to prosecute. 

A Com Pro Re move, / to change, or cause to cnange place. 

£ Com Pzo Re motion, { the act of moving. 

Ap Com Counter Re petition, the act of seeking, or asking; prayer. 
£m Ln A De base, that on which anyfhi^ stands) a 

foundation ;, hence, also, mean; 

vile; low. 



ce ly 

ed ion 

ly ce 

ous ousneas ously 



ial 
ively 



ed ing 



ing 
ort 



mg 
ing 
ing 



Exercise 572. 
Consequent, following with [a* an effect or remU.'] 
Consecute, to follow with, pn close order;'] to come next. 
Subsequent, following, or coming after. 
Obsequy,* a followmg closely, i. e. servilely , or compli^ 

antly. 
Persecute, to follow thoroughly \wiih pains, or mthhos- 

tile intentA 
prosecute, to follow forth, or up, [chiefly^ in law-suits,'] 
Execute, to follow out [to a completion ;] to finish ; 

to perform. 

Exercise 573. 
Ensue, to follow in [due order/] to succeed, or result. 

Pursue, to follow for, or after [an object ;] to ifollow up. 
Kemove, to move asain ; to put into another place. 
Kemote, moved back, i. e. far away ; hence, distant. 
Emotion, amoving [of the mind;] mental excitement. 
Conmiotion, a moving together, i. e. agitation ; tumult. 
Pnnnote, to move forward ; to advance. 

Exercise 574. 

Appet, to seek, or incline strongly towards ; to de- ite itive ence 

sire warmly. 

Compete, to seek [the same thdng] with [another ;] ed iter itresa 

bence, to carry on rivalry. 

Repeat, to seek again and again ; hence, to do often, ed 

Repetition, the act of repeating. al 

Abase, to make low, or hulhble. ed 

Debase, to make base, or vile ; to lower. ed 

Embase, to make base ; to vitiate ; to debase. ed 

* Also, but chiefly in the plural [obsequies, like eorequies,] ajolhmng to burial ; 
bence, a funeral procession ; funeral rites. 
t See the definition of this ftum in Exercise 5, page 17. 



ed 

ed 



ed 
ed 
ed 

ly 

s 
s 
ed 



er 
ing 



urn 

ion 
ivef 



s 

ance 
able 
ion 



ive 



edly 


er 


ary 




ing 


ment 


ing 


ment 


ing 


8 



o 



QQ 

•—I 

O 



O 

Q 
O 

1^ 




ANALYTICAL lUNUil.. 



lei 



SECTION xxn. 



Exercise 575. 



^ IXs Ex 
H^ £x Re 
Pro £x De 
JU Ob Anti« 
Al £ Inter 



Re-animate, 

Disanimate, 

Exanim, 

Interanimate, 

Transanimate,f 



Inter 

Ob 

Ob 

Col 

Col 



Trans 

In 

In 

Ambi 

Circum 



animate, 
trude, ? 
tnision, I 

locution, { 



to give life ; to quicken, 
to push, or thrust, 
the act of pushing, 
talk; discourse, 
the act of speaking. 



Exercise 576. 



Protrudei 

FrotritSt 

Intrude, 

Ihtrusiye, 



Abatruse, 

Obloquy, 

CoQoquy, 

OaUocut, 

OireumlociU^ 

Eloquent, 
Fkolocutor, 

hUerlocul, 



ed 


ing 


ion 


ed 


wg 


ion 


ous 


ate 


atioQ 


ed 


mg 


Km 


ed 


«ig 


ion 


ed 


ing 




ion 


ive 





to restore to life or vigor ; to revive, 
to deprive of life or spirit; to deject, 
out (», or without life ; without spirit, 
to animate mutually, 
to make life, or the soul [^a5«1 over \jaito 

another body. 2 
to push, or thrust forward. 

to push, or thrust forward. . _ 

to push [one's seif] into ^a place or com- ed ing er 

pany, without being invited or desired."] 
inclin^ or apt to intrude. nesa ly 

Exercise 577. 

pushed, or thrust away from [vitw ;] hence, ly neaa ity 
concealed; obscure; pn>£9und. 

a speaking against [on«,] that is, censorious ous 
language; calumny; reproach. 

a speaking together ; dialogue. 

to speak togemer ; to converse. 

to speak in a roundabout way; to express 
in a number of words. 

speaking out, i. e. freely and elegantly. 

one who speaks for, or in place of [a convo- 
cation A the speaker, or chairman ci an 
assembly. 

to talk, or speak among, or together ; tola- or (»ry ion 
terchange speech. 



al 


ist 


ion 


or 


ion 


oiy 


ship 


ce 

8 



Exercise 578. 
Ante Post Mis Fore Over date, 

Circum Obt De Per Pre ambulate, 



to give, or note [the time 
nf writings or doing 
any thing/\ 

to walk ; to go. 



* AntUoquy, literally, a speaking against, or opposite. The wtnd was formerly 
f^ied to any sort of prefatory disooutse, but u now no longer in use. 

t Trttnaanimaie is chiefly used in reference to the doctrine of the transmigration 
«f souls, anciently taaght b^ Pythagoras. 

t Ob, in obmbuUde, m merely mtensive. The word^ however, is nearly, if not 
«nite obsoleta. 

21 



Ifl2 

Com 
Com 

Ac 



MULmCAL UAKVAL. 



Ap Re Be Misap jprehend^ ) 
lire Re JDe Incom pnhenrihUt^ 

Dii Con Re Disac cordf 
Anti Syn Meta Para chronumf 

Exercise 579. 



to take; tolu^; toaeint. 
able, (HT fit to be taken, oi 

seized, 
the heart ; tlie mind, 
a time, or pcdod. 



ed ion or 

ory ed ica 

ons ed ing 

ed ing er 



ive rrely kn 
ed ing er 



ive ion iretf 
ed ing er 

ive oiy . iHj 



Perambnlate* to walk tlmnujli, or about. 

Deambulate, to walk from Iplact to place ;] to walk, or 

go around, or abroad. 
Preamble, to go, or canse to go before, [cM^y, in 

writing or discourse ;] that is, to preface 

or tntiodnce. 
Appreiiend, to take; or seize [one, as hy legal jproeess ;'] 

to take [mentaUy,] i. e. to perceive ; to 

anticipate. 
'diens^ to apprenend. 

iprehend, to take tocher, or within [a certain com- 
pass ;] 1. e. to embrace, or comprise; to 

take within [ike mind;'\ hence, to mider- 

stand. 
ComprehenSf to comprehend. 
Reprehend, to take, or hold back [one going wrong Q 

hence, to check; to rebuke; to repn- 

mand. 
Rqfrehens^ to reprehend. 

Exercise 580. 

Accord, [to be agreeahW] to the heart or win [of able ingly ant 

another Q hence, to agree with ; to grant. 
Concord, with, l^at is, agreement with, the heart, able ance ant 

or mind [of another ;] hence, hannony ; 

agreement. 
Discord, [the statfi if beintt\ apart, or diflferent [m] ant asdy f«l 

heart, or mind; hence, disagreement; 

variance. 
Record, to mind, or call to mind again ; hence, to ed ing er 

preserve, [e&e<%, in tm^tng,] the mem- 
ory of things. 
Anachronism^* the placing \of an event] apart from the tic 

[true] time ; an error in computing time. 
Antichranismt the placing against time, i. e. deviation 

from true time. 
Synchronous, bein^, or happening [at ike same] time izef icalf 

with [ani>ther evefU.] 
Metachronism, the placing [an event] after [the true time.] 
Parachronism, the placing [of an event] away from [its 

true] time ; mistake in regard to time. 

* Drop the final letter [m] of this woid, upon adding the suffix, 
t Upon addmg thi» termination, the hMrt three tottera of synehronsus must he 
inpped. 



AXALTnCJLL IKANTTAL. 



m 



ed ing ion 



ive 



ory iota 



Exercise 581. 

Co^ Pto Ex In Ad hUnt^ to have; to hold. 

4d Pre Re F(»re Mis judge, to deem ; to decide, or d< 

In Inter A. Di Re spersedi scattered; strewed; cast. 

CJon Diif Ex De Ref tort, to turn, or twist; towiencL 

A AttU En Dvs Sym phony, a sound. 

Con De Pro OS At test, to witness; to^zy. 

Exercise 582. "" 

Adhibit, to have, or hold to, or for [a certain me ;] 

hence, to use ; to apply. 
Prohibit, to hold forth [as a harrier ;] hence, to debar ; * 

to forbid. 
Exhibit, to hold out [to view ;] to show ; to display. 
Inhibit, to hold in, that is, to check ; to hinder. 
Adjudge, to judge, or sentence to; award. • 
Pr^iu^ to judge, or decide be&re [examinationJ] 
Asperse, to cast [blames or cengnre] at, or upon, i. e. to 

blame ; to censure ; to traduce. 
I nte npersey to scatter between, or among ; to place, at in- 

tervals, amcmg other things. 
Disperse, to scatter wide apart ; to spread ; to dissipate* 
Detort, to twist, or turn from {the plain meaning.'] 
£xt(»rt, to twist, or wrench from ; to draw out forci- 
bly. 

• Exercise 583. 
Aphony, without sound, i. e. voice, or speech ; dumb* 

ness. 
AntiphoBi sound corresponding [to sotMli^,1 i. e. alternate 

singing in choirs. 
Euphony, a^eeable sound. 

I>ysphony, difficulty of sound, i. e. of voice, or speech* 
Symphony, sound with [sound,'] i. e. accompanying 

sound; harmony of sounds. 
Contest, to witness together, i. e^ to test by witnesses ; 

hence, geiMraliy, to Htigate j to contend. 
Detest, to witness, or bear witness lavene] £rom; 

h^ce, to hate ; to abhor ; to loathe. 
Protest, to witness, or testify^ before, or openly ; to 

declare publicly. 
Attest, to witness, or testify to ; to certify. 



iaa iombT ively 

ed ing ion 

ed ing ment 

ed ing ntet 

ed er ion 

ed iag er 

edneMion vr% 



al ert «iyt 

ous ic V 

ous ize ized 

able less ingly 

ed able ation 

ed ationant 

ed ationor 



Con 
Im 



De 
Trans 



Ex 

Re 



Ob 
De 



Exercise 584. 
Re-con secrate. 
Din plant, 



to make sacred, or holy, 
to put, or set in the ground 

tor growth; heitoe, also^ 

to establish. 



.« CA&»&a,(tohoki£urnilv,l6.toiwirain,)i8ob0o]ete. 

. t For the explanation ol.Digtort and Retort, see Exercise 533. 

t AnHpkontr k applied to a book of anthemsi antipkonmr^, t» a sMrvMelMMk U 
flie Soman Cath^ Cbnichi 



104 

Counter Dis 



AlfALTnCAL UAXUAL. 



Fore After At 



tftBte, 



Anti Hypo Para* Syn Proe* tiheais, 



A Re Di Con £ 

Con Dit Ab As Re 

Exercise 585. 



to toncli [wUk Ae ttmgut 
and tMUote,! and lience, 
to* reush ; alao» to relkh 
mentally, 
a putting, or pUcin^; tiiat 
whi^ is put, or laid down 
for discuMkm. 

vidnoih the act of plucking, puQingf 
or rending. 

sonant, sounding. 



Consecrate, 

Desecrate, 

Execrate, 

Implant, 
Transplant, 



IMstaste, 
Foretaste, 



AntitheflBSff 



to make sacred ; to set apart entirely to ed 

sacred uses, 
to take out of the state of being sacred ; ed 

to unhallow ; to profane, 
to take or withdraw from [things] sacred, ed 

or worthy of regard ; hence, to curse ; 

to abhor ; to abominate. 
to plant or fix, [chiefly, ^mrinciples or doc- ed 

trines] in [the mind t] to inculcate, 
to plant across [from one place to an- ed 

other Q hence, generally, to remove 

from one place to another. ' 
disrelish; dislike; disgust. fbl 

to have a taste beforehand; to anticipate, ed 

I 
ExEECiSE 586. 



ion 
ing 
ing 

ing 



fully 



tical 



km 



ed 
er 



or 



ively 



tibie act of placing opposite [each others tic 

words and sentiments of opposite na- 
4 tyre ;] contrast. # 

Hypotihesis,! the act of placing under [tieio or eonsid* tic tioal 

eratUm, as very probable ;1 supposition. 
Hypothecate, to olace under [pledge ,*] hence, to ed ion 

pledge as security. 
Synthesis,! ^® ^^ ^ placing together [the parti of tic tically 1 

a compound;] composition. 
Convulse, to pull or draw [violently] together; ed ive 

hence, to shake or agitate violently. 
Conson, sounding with or together; hence, gen- ance oua 

erally, harmonious ; agreeing with. 

Exercise 587. 

Ab Disab Dis Per Mis use, to employ. 
Al De In Mis Re lay, to put or place. 
Con De Dis Pre Trans figure, to form ; to shape. 



* Parathuis is the placing of nouns denoting the same tiling near, or side- by 
mde of each other, that is, in the same case ; appOBition : — ^Prosthesis is thepuUmg 
•fan artfficial limb, or part in union with the body, to supply a loss or dtisKA, 

f Upon add&v tlie su£dxas to thift word, diop its final s^^teUsi [sk.] 



▲KALTTICAL XJJUriL. 



165 



Kb Sm 
Con Fro 

Abuse, 

Disabiue, 

Peruse, 

AHay, 

Delay, 

Configare, 

I^sfigoie, 



BCi Inter Re plead, to pot in or urge a plea ; to 

or argue a case in law. 
Re H* Mm create, to bring into existenee ; to fomL 

ExxBcisx 688« 

to use [in a toay cUffcrerWy firom [the ju$t or ed ing ive 

rigfU one ;! hence, to use iH ; to maltreat, 
to fiee from tne abuK [of deception or impoH- ed ing 

tion/] hence, to undeceive, 
to use thoroughly [by way of examination or ed hag al 

impection ,*] hence, to read through, 
to put to [rest or ease ;] hence, to calm ; to ed ing meat 

assuage ; to ease, 
to put olr [the time of action ;] to defer; to re- ed ing ment 

tard. • 
to form with, or according to, [a given model ;] ed ation ated 

to shape or pattern after, 
to deprive of [the jpraper farm or look;"] to de- ed ing ment 



form ; to d^ace. 

ExEBCiSE 589. 

Transfigure, to transform ; to shape difierently. ed ing ation 

Prefigon, to figore fsrth, or beforehand [by types err ed atxnatLTa 

signs ;J to portray previoi^ly. 

Implead, to bnng in to a pleading, or legal process ; that ed ing er 

ia,tosaeorpro6ecuto; hence, also, to accuse. 

Interplead, to plead or argue [a povU coming'\ between; ed ing f 

that is, an incidental issue. 

Miqplead, to plead erroneously ; to err in pleading. ing s 

Concreato, to form with, i. e. at the same time with. ed ing a 

Procreate, to bring forth into being ; to generate. ed ing ire 

Recreate, to create again, or anew ; that is, to revive the ed ion ive 

spirits; to cheer or enliven. 



Com De 
Com De 



Inter 
Inter 



9l 

Op 



ExE&ciSE 590. 

Post 

Ap 
Predis 



Juxta Super Circum Ante 

Ap Pro Dispro Mispro Superpro Re-ap portion. 

Ante Extra Infra Inter Super 



Ante pone^ \ to put (nt plaee. 
Dis po8e,t I to put or place. 
Post poaitioD, | theact of^pnlti]^; 

a location, 
a part; a ahara; 

a]so,toahare,ar 

allot. 
Supra mundane, pertaining to the 

world. 



ExjcBCisx 591. 

Component, putting,, or placing together; compoung; con- 
stituent. ■ 



* /nerMte, or increated, that is, uncreated, 

t Pose in the simple fonn, signifies, to pot {to one's wits, or to a stands] to ] 
ale; tononplaB. 



IM ABULXnCAL UAtaSAL* 

ConiKMe, toputfOrsettogether [tfic^Mon^erf] totiraagef edng «r 

to ai^JTUt ; to aetde. 
Conipontey placed, or set together [t» tf{ii« order;] conk- or i¥« 

pounded. 
Deponent, patting, or Icgrin^ dofwn; one who deposes, or s 

lays down ftestimaw^^ 
Depose, to put down*[jfri>m office or itation/} to degrade ; ed al able 

to lay down [otWs testmony ;] L e. to testify. 
Deposit, to put, or lay down, [ch^fly, for $afi ket^iing ar ed aiy orj 

jnreMervatum,] ' 
Interpose, to pnt between ; to put [one''$ $elf] between [jpor- ed ing ^ 

titi at variance ;] to intercede. 

£XERCI8£ 592. 

ppponent, one who puts {obstacles or objections'] before, or s 

in front of {^another ;] an opposer. 
Oppose, to put [hindrances or oostaeUs] before, or in front ed ing ition 

of; hence, 'to renst, or act against. 
Opposite, put, or placed before, or in front of; facing ; ad- ly ness ive 

verse; contrary. 
Postpone, to put, or place after [tke due Hme ;] todefer ; to ed er nami 

put o& I 

Appose, to put, [ddefiyf questions] to; hence, to examine ed ing a 

by interrogation. 
Apposite, put, or placed [suitahly] to; hence, fit; suitshle. ly ness ion^ 
Dispose, to put, or set apart [in due order for anypmr' ed ing able 

pose ,*1 to arrange ; to set apart, car part widi, 

oy safe. 
Apportion, to i>ortion to; that is, to allot to each his d«e ed ing vmbI 

share; to share. 
Pxopoftion, to [give'] portion for [portion ;1 i. e. rightly to ed ate aUe 

ai&pt parts or portions ; to rencUr synnaetricaL 

£xEiici8E 593. 

Pro In Con He A £ voke^ ) to call ; to summon. 

Fto In Con Re A £ vocation, V the act of calling; also^ a 

) calling, or occupation. 

Dis hit Inter Bi Sub$ £x section, the act of cutting ; a i£* 

vision. 

De Re Pre Cog Ag In nominate, to name; to designate. 

Af Con In Ob Re-af Disaf firm, strong; fixed. 

* Apposition, in Grammar, is the placing of two or more nouns, signifying the 
same thmg, in the samexase. 

t Voke k firam the Latin vooo. The of the root [voeo] '» chanffed inte X;, be- 
fore the letters e and t, to preserve its somid haid. , Upon adding snmzes bepmuiii 
with other vowels, the pi:^l will, therefore, change the k into e: thus, evmiis-ate 
ero^ate. 

t We have, also, the fonn inseef, a word chiefly api^ed to certain small aufanals, 
as wasps, ants, spiders and the like, from the appearance of their bodies, wbieli seem, 
In some places, to be cut into two parts or dmrions i-^subseetion, is a imaUer see* 
daa, or a part of a section ; a subdivision. 



ate 


ated 


ed 


ate 


er 


aUe 


ible 


km. 


ing 


ion 


ing 


ka 



EzsBctfS 6M. 

^t^K>foke, locall finth [tke pastiamsQ to excite; to call in^y ed atht 
forth [a penon to a tnal cf 9tTm^glk% w 
' fintff J to challenge. 

laToke, to call upon \inpraytr or iuppUeaHon ;] heoce, ed 
to implore ; to entreat. 

Convoke, to call, or summon together ; to oonveoe or aa- ing 
semble by a call or summcnifl. 

Revoke, to call back, [mt a granU, stattUe, temtMCA, or ed 
edict;] to recall; to repeaL 

Iteect, to cnt apart, or in pieces, [a« an qsUnud hody^ ed 
for the purpose of examinatum ,*]| to anato- 
mize; hence* aleo, to lay open for mspection. 

Interaect, to cut between, or mntuaily, that is, to meet ed 
and croM one another, as lines. 

Bisect, to cut, or divide into two \_part8J] ed 

Exercise 595: 

JDemmm, to name specially, or to give a paxticalar ated aUe ativa 
name to. 

Prenominate, to name, call^ or designate before ; to nomi- ion ed ing 
nate jirevioosly. 

Renominate, to name, or designate a^ain. ed in|; km 

Cognomen,* the name [joined'] with [the Chriitum ate ation al 
nam« ;1 the surname ; an additional name. 

Affirm, to make firm, or strong \hy poeUive asser- ed ativa able 

tion ;] hence, to assert, or declare posi- 
tively. 

Confinou to make strong, or strengthen, with [addi" ation atoiy ing 
Oonal evidence or testimony/] to corrob- 
orate ; to support. 

fafinn, not strong; weak; foeble; unsound. ity ative aryf 

Obfirm, tomakenrm£ti»|mrpp»e;] to harden. ed ing ation 

EuEBciSE 596. 

Sx later Counter Re XTn Re-ex changing, moving £rom one place 

or state to another; 
altering; varying. 

Intert Col Se £ Recol Pre-e lect^ to take or pick out ; to 

choose; to gather, 
the state or condition of 
standing; that which 
stands, 
to cause to stand; to 
station* put or place. 

Oc Ac la Inter Be Pro ddenl, ' falling. 

* The t in this word is exchanged for t, in the deriysthre foims. 

t Tnfinnsry, a plaoe or residence for the inform, or side. 
. t The foial letter [r] of this prefoc, is dianged (by Role ILtPHeUS) into?; ss 
that we have iateOect, not ioteileot 



Ciroum Sub Di Ex Con In sconce, ' 

Con In De Sub Precon Re-in etiVuU^ 



168 



AKALTnCAL XJJUriL. 



Collect, 
RecoUectt 

Elect, 

Select, 
Intellect, 



nent 


ing 


•neoosivelj 


ing 


km 


or 


nw 


ive 


ing 


ire 


iOQ 



Substance, 



Distant, 
Extant, 



Constant, 

Instant, 
Instance, 



»1* 



ial* 



ced 



Exxmcns 597. 

Exchange, to change entirely [<me thing for on- ed 

other ;] to baiter ; to redproGate. . 
Interchange, to change between, or mutually; to 

give uid take mutually, 
to gather together; to assemble; to ed 

gather into a mass, 
to collect again [idea$ or trnpresnom ed 

jprmotK^y ^oo*;] to bring back to re- * 

membrance ; to recall, 
to pick out, or choose [one for qfiee ;] meer 

to choose ; to prefer, 
to take apart [from a number/] to edly 

adopt from preference ; to cull out. 
\the Jaculty that] chooses, or distin- ual 

ffuishes between [things ;] the un- 
derstanding. 

Exercise 596. 
Circumatance, that which stands around, i. e. any thing ed iate*^ 
immediately connected with, or attend* 
ant upon. 

that which stands imder, [as a support ;] ea iate* 
any thing that subosts; the main or 
essential part. 

standing, or being [far] apart ; remote. ce ly 

standing out [above the swface ;1 hence, cy oe 
being, or remaining in a state of preser- 
vation. 

standing together [%oithout flinddng or cy ce 
changing;] that is, firm, steady, unva- 
rying, continuous. 

standing, or being [dose] upon; hence, 
pressing; immediate; momentary* 

that which stands, or bears [c^e2;yj upon 
[a case or subject ;] an example ; also, 
to instance, i. e. to exemplify. 

Exercise 599. 
Constitute, to put together [fxTnLy ;] to form ; to com- ion ionality ed 
pose 5 hence, generally, to set, fix or estab- 

Institute, to put, or cause to stand, on [a firm basis ;] ion or 
hence, generally, to establish,. appoint, or- 
dain. 

Substitute, to put under [duty for another;] that is, to ion ed 
put in place of another. 

Destitute, put, or placed [aw^oy] from, that is, deprived ion ly 
oi [means or aiat\ hence, needy ; mend- 
less; lonely; abject. 

* Upon adding this suffix, the e before e final of the radical, (which latter is to ha 
dropped,) js to be changed into t : thus, circumstontiatew 



ly aneous aneity 
es ed iog 



ional 



nig 



AMALTOCAL KAK1TAI.. 



IM 



0eoident» the £dlmg, at going down [jpotn^ or .floee of al 

t^ aun ;] that is, the West. 
Incident, fidling, or lunppenrng in, or upon; also, some- al ally 

thmg happening or occurring. 
Accident, [aii evenf] falling, or happening to. 



M Para Epi Peri 
IXa Ana Para Eji 



ExEBCiss 600. 
Apo Cata graph,' 

Pw* 



Ap De 
Pro Pre 
Ex Dia 
Ex Dia 



Pro Sua 



Im 

Sua 

Per Re-ex 

Com Kecom 



grami 

Re-ana pend, 
peiue, 
pefid, 
pense, 

£xxiu;i8E 601. 



al ally 



[any thmg] mari^ed, traced, 
or written* 

[that ukkh W] marked, de- 
lineated, or written; a 
mark; apgore. 

tohan^. 

ahan^mg. 

to weigh. 

to weigh; a weighing. 



Digraph, 



two ^wnoeW] written [together;'] that ie^ the a 
ivimon of two vowek, of which one only ia to 
be pronounced. 

Paragraph, a written [marki or charaeter] near [a word, or ical ical^ ia 
in the margin, to denote a division of a dis" 
course ;] hence, a distinct part or section of a 
writing. 

Epigraph, [any thmg] written or inscribed upon [a month a 
ment or buUding/] an inscription ; a title. 

Perigraph, [any thing cardesdy\ marked around ; i. e. de- a 
hneated ; a rude sketch or outline. 

Apograph, [any Oiing] traced, or written from [an original,'] a ai 
that is, a copy ; a transcript. 

Catagraph, [any thing] traced, or drawn accordinff to ^a a 
model or original,] the first draught of a pic- 
ture; apfome. 

ExxRcisx 602. 

Diagram, [a figure] marked out^ or thoroughly define- a 

ated, [as a geometrical figure.] 
Ainagram, [the letters of a word] written apart [from 

their due order, t. e> transposed so as to 

form a different word*] 
Paragram, [something] beyond [that] written ; that ia, 

an expression having the nature of a -pun 

or quibble. 
Epigram, [verses or lines] written upon [a statue or atic adst a 

monument;] mence, any short poem end- 
ing with a point, or witty turn. 
Programme, [any thing] written, or set forth [by way of a 

advertisement, prefaee, or general outUne,] 

* For the usual forai of the derivathre, when this particle [pro] is prefixed, ssa 
the next exercise but one. 

9SL 



adc atismatiM 



atiat 



170 AITALTTICil. IUHITAXk 

Impeiidy to haiig npoa; to ofv«E]ifiig; to be over €ff iag ed 

dose upon* 
Depend, to haac oown fiom, [of m nmport ;] kenee* enw er ent 

toiSynpon; to lett upon tor eopport. 

Exercise 603. 

Expend, to weigh out; that is, to count, lay or give ed itore ing 

oQt; toepend; tooonsume. 
Expense, awei^lnng or layin^oat; an expending. fol ive less 

CSompenae, to weigh tpgetbier, i. e. one with an^er; ate atioa ated 

hence, to give vahie £or value. * 
IXspense, to wei^h apart, or in parts ; hence, to give able ary ation 

oat in portions; to distribute ; to allow. 
Fropense, hanging, or leaning fiyrward ; hence, inclined ity ion ities 

or disposed to ; tendii^ towards. 
Snspend, to hang up [in baUmoe ; j hence, to hold in a ed ing er 

state undecided ; to intermit. 
Suspense, the state of hanging [in deubt;'] hence, nn- ive ible oiy 

certainty; a pause; acessatioD. 

EzE&cisE 604. 

Re Pm 6mb Co Fore Insnb ordinalinB, the act of placing in a 

certain order, or rank* 

Re Con Per ^ De Unde Preoon eew&, ^ to take. 

Re* Con Self-con De Miscon Precon ceit, I taken; <he act of taking 

Re Caa Per De Ac Inter cejpUont { the act of taking. 

Re Pre Per In Ac Inter apietU^ ) taking. 

Ap Im £x Dis Misap Disap propnate, proper ; pecnliar ; be* 

longuig; suitable. « 

Ezsacisx 605. 

Subordinate, to rankt <Nr station under; to put into a ed acy }y 

grade infiBrior. 
Co-ordinate, ra&ed with, or being ci the same rank ly ness ion 

with. 
Pre-ordain, to rank, or order beforehand ; to pre-ap- ed ing ance 

• points to decree prevk>usly. 
Receive, to take back, or in return, [tu a reward ;] ed able er 

thsDce, generally, to take ; to obtain. 
JRecqfU to receive ; to take. ive ibility ivity 

Perceive, to take or receive ^ideas or impreinon$] able ably ed 

throu^ [the medium (^ the senees ;] to 

understand ; to discern. 
PereepU to take or receive through [ihe 8ense$ ;] to ible ive ibility 

pevceive. 

Exercise 606. 

CoBoeive, to take or hold, [ehi^y^ the idea er i$iuige able ing ed 
X of a Aing] within [die mind ;] to oom- 

^ prehend; to imagine; to think. 

• Commonly written rtcetjpt 



UUUnCAL MAmiMJm 



171 



Comeeptt 
Deceive, 

Deceit, 

Deeepl^ 



hence, a fancy, nockn, or apmkm ; aln, 

tofimcy. 
totakewithm; toooBcehre. in ire ibie 

to take, or lead from [«ala< is ri^;] to able er ing 

Bualead; to defraud; to delude, 
that which deceives ormisleads ; a cheat; fid Mty frdnett 

fraud; stratafleBo. 
totakefrom [teioXurt^/] todecehro. rn 



iUo 



ExBACiss 607. 



Accept, totaketo[oii€'«felf;] toieoeiv«&Tor- ationabla ancd 

aUy. 
Intercept, to take or seize [a thing] between \Ae ed ing kn 

fointfram toUc^ anduuU to wUm it 

u proceeding ;] to stop on the way. 
Appropriate, proper or peciuiar to [aiMiitieiifarjpcr- ness ly ioa 

Am, plaoe, or (Mi^;] set apart or 

suitable to [a special use.'J 
Impropriate, to make [a dtttnh possession] proper ed ing ko 

to, i. e. the private pioperty o( [a 

layman ;] to assign. 
Ezpcoiffiate, to take out of Uie state of being proper ed ing ko 

to, or possessed by; to deprive o^ 

[<u one^s wiU or reason-'] 
Disappropriate, to deprive of [a possession] appropri- ed ing ion 

ated; to take from the proper use. 

EXKECISK 608. 

Ab Re Ex Di* Pre Inter scind, to cut 

{a Ex Con- De Pre Inter cision^^ the act of cutting. 

E Super Con Inter Contra- Ad vene, ) to come or go. 

In Con Super Inter Pre Circum vetUion, > the act of oooung or ^ 

) going. 

Kd Con Det Pro Per Tra dition, the act of giving or de- 



ExxRCisx 609. 

Abscind, to cut off from, [as a member from (he hody^ or 

a tetter fivm a tcordJ] 
Rescind, to cut off affain, [as a nde^ law, resolutiont or 

decree ;] nence, to repeal ; to revoke. 
Prescind, to cat, or sever completely [things dosely imt- 

ted ;! to abstract. 
Predse, cut [ojlfyroml befisre ; hence, generally, pared, 

or trimmed to a nicety; exact. 



ed 



mg 



ed ing 



* JHseind, to cut ajpart ; to diride faito two parts. 

t See Exercises 502 and 503, and especiaUv the note, page 136. 

I Dedition m a gifing^ or yisldiag 19 eqo^Msly; a 1 



172 AVALTTICAL BUNITiX. 

Coocite, cut ^doum] within [narrow UmitMji] Iwaee, ly nev looP 

bnef; dboit; succinct* 
Excise, [a certain anunint} cut (ml [fiym <me*8 prop-^ M»m 6d 

erty, as a taxi] hence, an inland duty, or 

impost. 
Deeif, to cut off [a ca»e in dispute ;] to decide ; to ive ively ion 

end. 
Incise, to cut into; to penetrate and part with an edge or nie oiy 

tool 

Exercise 610. 

Invent, to come into [knowledge of something new ;] ed ing er 

hence, to devise; to contrive. 
Supervene, to come over, or upon, [as extraneous or addi" ed ing ient 

tumalA 
Intervene, to come between [particylar events or tunet.] ed ins ient 
Convene, to come together; to me^ or assemble; to ed able mg 

cause to meet ; to convoke. 
Convention, the act of coming or going together ; hence, al aiy ist 

alsd; agreement. 
Convent, [a hody of persons'] c(nne togetiher, or assem- nal a 

bled \J&r religious purposes i\ a monastery ; 

a nunnery. 
Advent, a coming to \a place ;] a coming to [a ddng^ iva itioafna] 

as accidental or ojcccsso^.'] 

Exercise 611. 

Prevent, to come, or go before \in order to hinder or ingly able ive 

stop ;] hence, to hinder ; to stop. 
Circumvent, to come around \uMk frauds or deception ;] ed ing ive 

hence, to delude ; to deceive ; to take un- 
fair advanta^ of. 
Addition, the act of givm^, or putting [one iking'] to al ally ary 

[anoikerji] an mcrease. 
Conditiont the act of putting [things'] together \tn a cer- ality ed ary 

tain state ;] hence, a particular state ; also, 

to stipulate. 
£ditiion,f the act of giving out, i. e, publication. or ed ing 

Prodition,f the act of eiving, or putting fi>rl^ [something or orious ory 

intrustea;'] treachery ; treason. 
Perdition, the act of giving thoroughly [to destruction /] 

henc^ entire ruin, Iom, or destruction. 
Tradition, the act of delivering, or handing over,* [as ally ist ary 

facts t tloctrines, or opimonsy fiwn father to 

son*'] 

Exercise 612. 

In Ab De Pre Sub-in Contra-in dicadon, the act of giving, aettuig 

apart, or vowing. 

* The fonn concision was often used to dasignatothe Jews, L e. those who adhered 
to the doctrine or ]M%ctice of circumeimcm. • 

^ J^vyy tAa iast /4ra» iatten of this woid, upon adding the I 



ANALYTICAL HAIXUAL^ 178 

Re Oe In Con Inter Trans cttr, ^ to run. 

Re Ex Disin De Trans cursion^\ the act of rmining. 

Dis Inter Re Con Non-inter coarse, ) a running ; a career. 

Ar De Ab Inter Snr Pro rogation, the act of asking or seek 

ing; the act of asking [in 
prayer;'] supplicatum. 

Exercise 613. 

Indicate, to sive in [a sign or intimaUon ;] to signify ; to ed ive ing 

snow ; to point out. 
Abdicate, to give away [one^s ri^ht, or power ;] hence, to ed ing ion 

renounce ; to relinquish ; to resign. 
Dedicate, to give or set [away] firom [common to special or ing atoiy ator 

sacred uses ;] to omsecrate ; to devote. 
Predict to dve or put Def(»re [on«, an o^rmo^um;] to af- ate able apt 

firm ; to aver. ^ 

Recur, to run back, or return quickly ; to run back [in ed ence ent 

thought,'] 
Ckcur, to run towards, or against ; hence, to take place ; ed ing enoe 

to come to mind. 
Incur, to run into [risk, danger, debt, or any evil;] ed ing 

hence, to become liable or exposed to. 
Concur, to run together [in unison;] hence, to agree; to ed ent enoe 

meet ; to conjoin. 

Exercise 614. 
Concoiinet a numing together, i. e. a meeting; an a»* 

semblt^. 
Discouse, a running apart [from thought to thought, or ive* er ed 

from topic to topic;] hence, a dissertation; 

also, to treat dt, or reason upon. 
Intercourse, a runmng between [parties sj hence, com- 

mumcatkm ; reciprocal dealmg. 
Recourse, a running back [for aid;] a return. 
Arrogi to ask, or claim to [one^s self, undue power, ated ant ative 

rank, or estimation ;] to assume ; to make 

false claims to. 
Derogate, to ask, or seek [to take] from; hence, to de- ory ed ing 

tract; to disparage. 
Interrogate, to ask between, or mutually ; hence, gener- ory ed ing 

ally, to inquire ; to question. 
Abrog, to ask or demand back [a law, statute, decree, ated ating able 

ordinance ;] to revere ; to repeal. 
Surrogate, to ask or caU under, L e. in place of, [an- ed ing s 

other;] hence, to deputize; also, adepu- 
> ty ; a substitute. 

Prorogue, to ask, or call forward [to tzjfttA<r« ^m6,] that ed ing adonf 

is. to put off; to protract ; to prolong. 

* This form [diseowrsiee,] which means, having the nature of a discourse, i a 
reasoning, is to be distingaiahed from the kindredform disenrsive, which ngnifie^ 
tending to nm apart, or rove, i. e. roving ; desultory, 

t l^oa adding a<t9iiy drop the last fiMlettcis of prorag;iiA 



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i s 



fi 

11 

k 8 



I 



1 1* 

ill ... 

' * c 

ale-* . 



im 



AKuaneAi, wuntx. 



as. 



•8 I"-? .§•«•« •8*8 




6 



hiiili 



& 



a- 

•A 



1^1 ^M 



s'isl^a-* 
s I g * .«■» - 



fe'a 



Sf SS. 



I 










kv£LtmMh kA^Al. 



SECTION, xxrr. 

COMPOUND WORDS. 

As in analyzing derivatives, we set out with an explanatum of the 
suffixes, taken apart trom the radicals with which they are found ooo- 
nected, so in resolving into their elements the class of words now un- 
der consideration, we shall begin by explaining separately those parts 
that are postfixed. These postfixed words must be well understood 1by 
the pupil, before he enters upon the study of the next Section* ; sinbb 
it is there taken for granted, that the learner is perfecdy familiar with 
their significations. Most of them, it will be perceived, are inseparabie, 
that is, incapable of being used as separate and independent words. 

Exercise 677. 

4igogue, a leader, or that which leads. 

cJgyy Of aJgia, pain ; snaring. 

amhuUit, a walker, or one who walks. 

angle, a comer; the space between two straight lines tittl 

meet in a point, 

angular, having, or relating to, an angle, or angles. 

arUhrepy, mankind. 

4tndery a stamen ; an organ of ffewers. 

ixndriany having a stamen, or stam^as. 

archf a ruler ; a leader. 

arehiy, government; rule. 

auUcSf tne science of pipes, or machines* 

inU, one who lives, or has his living, 

chord, the string of a mnsical instrument. 

t)hromatic, having color, 

capsular, having a capsule, or seed veaseL 

centric, pertaixdns to the centre, 

culture, the act or tilling ; cultivation. 

ExEaciSE 678. 

cidSy a killing, or slaying. 

casMj the world ; the universe. 

cracyy government; rule. 

demiCf relating to, or affecting the people. 

* It ii not, h o w e r er , neceBMiTy, neither indeed k it expedient, peiliape, that the 
whole of this Seetion shoidd he leaned, before commencinj^ the study of the nezL 
liet the seholar learn thoroagfaly the meanings of all the words in one Exercise of 
this Section; then proceed in the next Section, till his stock of poetfixed worA k 
•xhansted. Then let him retnm ag;ain and learn the next Exercise in order and iS 
caatiane studying the two Sections connectedly throng^ont 



iJULTTIOAL MJJXUAL^ 



deKtaUf 

dedmOf 

dactylouif* 

doxy 

dromyy 

dromieSf 



duct, 
0KnuUf 



eAes, 

eval, 

ferouSf 

uction, 
ficetUy 



foliate^ 
fi>lious,f 
fluous, 
Me, 

Jlarausy 
gamy, 



gH 

grade, 

gen, 

genous, 

geneous, 

gony* 

gnamy, 

gnosyy 

gy^y 



haWng, or proyided with, teeth* 

teoi or tentJi. , 

having fingers, or toes. 

an opinion; a. doctrine. 

a course ; a running. 

the art of coursing, or taking a course. 

a course ; a race-course. 

a tube ; a channel. 

yearly. 

a word ; speech ; pronunciation* 

Exsacisx 679. 

custom; habit. 

having or pertaining to, life or an age* 

bearing; producing. 

cleil; split; divided. 

the act of making or causing. 

making. 

to make ; the thing made. 

shape; likeness. 

having leaves. 

having leaves ; also, thin, like a leaf. 

flowing. 

that which makes to flee, or drives away* 

fleeing ; departing from. * 

having flowers. 

marriage. 

an angle ; a comer. 

ExxRciu 680* 

the tongue. 

degree; standing. 

that which produces, or constitutes. 

partaking, or being of a sort, kind, or nature* 

partaking, or being of a sort, kind, or nature* 

origin; generation. 

the art of discerning ; the ability to discern. 

science ; profound knowledge. 

the pistil of a plant. 



* DaetylouB is from dactyl, a word of Greek origin, which, m EsgUah, ii iiet^ 
used m the literal sense, hut is applied to a poetic foot, which like a/f^ftr hai thie# 
joints or memhers, i. e. one loxu;, and two short syllables. 

,t Folious is from the Latin Jolitmi, a leaf. We thence have regnlailyt £olia<rM«#« 
«^tf, aged, ate, ated, ation, ature, o, &o. The last form [folio] is ehiefly naed t« 
agnify a book, in which the leaf, or sheet is of the full size, that is, not folded ia 
puarto, octajiH} or any smaller dimensions. 



ARALrmJkL KAXtkU 



gram, 
graphf 
graphy,* 



hedrotiy 
libratei 
hcuJar, 
hquence, 

literal, 

lateral, 

lobate, 

latryy 

later, 

kgue, 
meter, 
tnefyy, 



money, 

marphimi, 

nuUh, 

maihy, 

maton, 

machy, 

fnanous, 

mime, 

naut, 

nox, 

nesia, 

nomial, 

nomy, 

ody, \ 

edy, J 

orama, 



opsy, 

ocular, 

phihong, 

plieate, 

fie. 



to send forth ; to direct, or manag^b ' 

baring; prodaoi]^. 

a mar^ letter, sketch, or delineation engmyed or t 

a writing; drawing; written aoooont. A 

the act or art of maridng, writings or engraying; « 

history, or description, 
a word; discourse; reason; a treatise or science. 

Exercise 681. 
a side ; a plane, 
to balance ; to poise, 
having cells, or cavities, 
the act of talking, 
talk; discourse, 
having, or relating to, a letter, 
having, or relating to, a ude. 
having lobes, 
worship; service. 
a worshiper, 
a stonC; 

discourse ; also; a precept or commandment 
an instrument to measure with, 
the act, art, or science of measuring. 

Exercise 682. 
divination; fortune-telling, 
having, or being of, a form, 
instructed; taught, 
learning; knowledge, 
having power to move, or act. 
a fi^ht ; battle ; contest, 
havmg hands. 

one that imitates, or represents by actioii. 
a sailor, 
night, 
islands. 

a name ; a term, 
law; government; managemcsit. 

an ode ; song ; poem, 
a sight, or view. 

Exercise 683. 
view; observation, 
pertaining to the eye ; having eyeot 
a sound. * 

fold, 
fold. 



9» ■ 

potent) 

fkemjff 

parous, 

pqUst, 

polite, 

fhony, 

pedia, 

partite, 

jpcd, 

petal, 

petalous, 

phoMa, 

potamuif 

phfUy 

phorouSf 

reme, 

seotioii, 

scope, 

sp^rmoui, 

Inhere, 

sciouSf 

similitude, 
sticky 
statics, 
static. 



mmouty 
stice, 
iophy, 
tone, 

theism, 

trophy, 

teuch, 

taph, 

technic, 

type, 

tomy, 

virate, 

valvular, 

vorous, 



JMALmOAb XAIIVAIn 



ieeUng; disease; affiwtioii. 

having power, or beiog powivftil 

having leaves. 

aspeddng. 

eatmg ; aooustomed to eat 

producing, or bringing forth. 

one that sells, or deals in. 

an inhabitant of a dty ; a oitixen. 

sound. 

instruction; knowledge. 

ExxacitX 684* 
divided; separatied. 
afoot. 

a flower-leaf, 
having floWer-Ieaves. 
fear; dread, 
a river. 

a plant; a shoot, 
producing; bearing, 
an oar. 

th6 act of cutting. 

a view ; an instrument for viewfaig or examining, 
oontaining seed. 
a round tody ; a globe, 
possessing knowledge ; knowing, 
having, or castinff a shadow, 
likeness; resemmance. 
a To^ ; a line. 

the science of balancing, or weighing, 
balancing; suspending. 

ExERcisK 685. 
^otinding. 

a stopping, or standing still. ' 

wisdom; knowledge, 
modulation of voice ; a sound, 
having tone. 

belief in the etistence of a god. 
a nursery, or hospital. 
a book, or a division of a book, 
a tomb, 
relating to art 

a mark ; figure ; emblem ; letter, 
the act, art, or science of cutting, 
the office, or government of men. 
having valves, 
eating, or accustomed to eat, or devour. 



1 

H 



O 

•J 

g 

O 

:s5 




904 



AKALYTIDAL XAKUII.. 



SECTION XXT. 



COMPOUND WORDS. 

HAvma learned from the previous Seciion the meaning of thoM 
parts of the compounds, which are to be pas^xed, the pupil is now 

Prepared to enter upon ihe present Section, wherein, the other parts 
eing duly defined, the two, in each case, are to be imited, and than 
explain^ in combination. No change of form will be neoessair in 
uniting them ; nothing more being required than merely to write thorn 
together as ^ne word! In defining the compounds thus produced, hcnr. 
ever, care must be taken so to connect the meanings of the parts com- 
bined, as best to express their united signification. Nor will this be 
attended with the slightest difficulty, if the pupil be made acquainted, 
by his teacher, with the true application of the words in the lesson, 
BBFOBX he is required to commit it to memory. Few words and few 
moments only will be required for this purpose. For the mode of pre- 
paring the written exercise, see Model 5, on the page preceding* 



Dem, 
Ped, 

Myrt, 
B^dr, 
P^sm, 
Oardi, 



ikeptoflt. 
aawLa. 
a mystery. 
toaUr. 

scSwa; spiUU, 
AchearU 



algy. 



ExxaciSE 686. 

Odont, 

Cephal, 

Noct,» 

Sonm,^ 

Tri, 

Quadr, 



agogue. 



a tooQi. 
ike head, 
flight. } 
sleep. { 
three.} * 
four. J 



I algy. 



ambuliit. 
an^e. 



£zxaci8x 687. 



Quinqu, five^ 
Sex, 

Phil, 
Mis, 

ysi,* 



stx. 
love, 
haired, 
a dog. 
nature. 



angular, 
anthropy. 



Kept, sevem. 

Oct, eight. 

Mon,t one. 

Chili, a thousand. 

Iren, peaee, 

Polem, ioar. 



ander. 
andrian* 

arch. 



Mysteri, mystery. 7 ^. 
Myri, ten thousand. $ ^^ 



ExxBCiSE 688. 

Pent, 
flept. 



five, 
seven. 



Jarchy. 



* In applieationf there is no diffisience between neetambalist and wmnanibaliit 
t NoTB, that most of the compounds to he formed in this Section, regularly adn^ 
s^lix€S, after the manner of simple, or uncompounded radicals. Thus, mtmarekf 
gives monarchy, monarohoZ, monarohteal, monarchtsf, monarcMire, Sdc To finm 
and define such words as are derivable, in this way, firam those in the xegular lesson, 
should be made a part <tf the oral exercise. 

t Cynanthropy is a species of madness, in which men exhibit the qualities af dogw, 
P^fsiantkropy, the aatore of man, i a. the dootrine of the eonstitutioB and C 
sf mankiBdi 



HUkUrtlQA^ lUlflUi^ 



Taxi, 

Top, 
Tetr, 



a divUion of an'i 

army, \ arch. 

ajdact; adit^ficL^' 



Arkt, 
Olig. 

Hier, 
Patri, 



iheh%U. 
the few. 
atooman. 
aaertd, or hoL^ 
a father. 



archy- 



EXEKCISE 



Nav, aMp. >^, 

Mon, one; iole. J •' 

Hydr, vHiter. aplicfl. 

Ceaio, in cotmmu. bite. 

Mono, one. } 

Poly, fMny. J 



chonU 



Mono, one. ebiDmatiCi 

Tri, (kree. capsiilar. 

Geo, 1heearlh.\'^^' 



EXBRCISE 690. 



Dei, 


a god. 






Fratri, 


ahroQm.} 






Soron, 


agister. 






2.^ 


sdf 






Parri, 


a parent. 






Tyranni 


a tyrant. 


> cide. 


infimti, 


an infant. 


cide* 




a prophet. 






Homi, 


aman. 






Parenti, 


a parent. ) 




Matri, 


a mother. 






Micro,* 


big; great. ) 




Regi, 


a Jcing. 






Mega, 


Nun. 






ExxmciSE 691. 






Demo, 


thepeople. 




Pan, 


aU; thevMe. 


denric. 


Aristo, 


the best. 




Caco, 


evU. 


demon. 


Timo, 


vmth; property. 




Tri, 


three. \ 




Auto, 


self 




Qnadri, 


four. 






Ochlo, 


the mtdMtude. 


• cracy. 


Quinqiie,jitw!. 




dentate. 


GysBDO, 


aiooman. 




Octo, 


eight. 






Demono, an [evil] spirit. 




Decern, 


ten. ^ 




; 


Strato, 


themsHtary; the 
army. 




Duo,t 


two. 


decimo. 






ExsBCUE 692. 


* 




Mono, 


one. ' 




Ortho, 


straight f ngfe. 


droniy. 


Tri. 
Tetra, 


^^•[dactylcm.. 




Palin,t 


a horse. \ 

hack. ; 


drame. 


Hexa, 


six. ] 




Aque, 


water. \ 




Ortho, 


straight; right, 
another; contrary 


Jdox 


Venti, 


wind, i 


duct. 


Hetero, 


. * UImL. 


Bile, 


iheHU.\ 


Ortho, 


straight; right. 


dromicfl 


.§ Cali, 


heat. ) 





* Microcosm m often ajqplied to ffMn, as embracinff in himself a «Ht of Utile worlJL 

t A hook is said to >)e in dwdecimo form, or size, whenthe sheet is folded int* 
twelve leaves. 

X Palindrome is a iK* oie applied to a word or sentence, which is.the same, whetbat 
lead backwards or forv/ ords. 

4 Orthodromics, Vibti ally, the art of nffmifiir ffrmf-M, or direct, is the art of sa8« 
lag in the are of a 0P>/ toMe. 



AVALTTIOAL HAmTAA. 



Qnadr, fiwr. 
Qainqnt five. 
Sex, ni;. 
Sept, 9€ven* 
Oct, €^^At 

Nov, mM. 



• ennitL 



Smcus 69X 

Dec, 

Cent, 

Mill, 

Ortho, 

Caco, 

Long, 

Prim, 



te$u 

a hundred. 

a thouiond. 

ri^ht; correcL epy. , 

emL ethes. 

long. 

first. 



eraL 



Carboni, t^uwea^d^ 
Cheli, a cUmo. 
Corymbi, top; head; duUer. 
Caiui, a stem or stalk. 
Cruci, a cross. 
Capri, copper. 



£x«ftci8E 694. 

Calami, ahoUow9td0e. 
Cortici, bark. 
Ensi, a sword. 
Fructi, jrwJt. 
Fru^, frmtor com. 
Fern, iron. 



kferoos. 



'ferooa. 



Flori, ajlomer. 
Foli, aUaf, \ 
Glandnli, gland. 
Glandi, acorns* 
Hederi, ivy. 
Lani, tciol. 



fexaos. 



&ro^8. 



Nocti, night. 

Nectari, nectar, 

Nuci, 

Odori, 

Palmi, 

Bacci, 



a nut. 
scent, 
a palm, 
aoerry. ^ 



feiooa. 



Salini, salt. 

Saluti, health. 

Semini, seed. 

Sonori, sound; noise. 

Somni, sleep. 

Stelli, a star. 



Tri, three. 

Quadri, four. 
^maqat^Jwe. 
Sex, six. 
Octo, eight. 
]becem, ten. 



£4. 



£xs«ci8E 695. 

Lauri, a laurel. ' 
Lnmini, light. 

gici, light. 
ammi, a breast. 
MelH, honey. 
Metalli, metal. 

EzxRciSE 696. 

Pmni, a prune. 
Porai, an apple. 
PiBtiUi, apisHl; apomtoL 
Refiini, resin. 
Racemi, a duster. 
Bulbi, a round root* 

Exercise 697. 

Sopori, sle^; lethargy. 
SiHci, afint. 
Spini, a thorn. 
Succi, sem, 
Argenti, suijer. 
Ann, geld. 

ExxiMiiSE 698. 

Stupe, stupid; duU. 
Torre, to parch. 
Patre, rotten; carious. 
Sparge, to sprinkle. 
Tabe, to waste away. 
Cale, to bewarm^ or hot. , 



fextnsfc 



• ferous* 



^ferous* 



^ftctkm.^ 



* See note on thk word, page 188. 



4BA£rCICAL MinOMtH 



mf 



DuodedsL twelve. > ^^ 



Haiti, 
Magni, 



Cancri, 
Cribri, 
Cubi, 
Cylindri, 

Dd, 



Capri, 

Cauli, 

Cordi, 

Cruci, 

£qiii, 

Lenti, 



Denti, 

Coralli, 

Culici, 

Cuni, 

Scuti, 

Stelli, 



greaL ficent. 



a crab* 

atieve* 

a cube* 

along cireuUtr body. 

awing. 



Saciit 
Vene, 
Muni, 

ExXBCiSK 699. 



Fungi, 
Li§ni» 

^**™- Reti, 
Styli, 
Calci, 



a goat. 

a stem or stalk. 

a heart. 

across. 

eqital. 

a lens. 



a tooth. ^ 
coral, 
a flea, 
a wedge. 
a shieui. 
a star. 



fi)nxi. 



ExuLciSE 700. 

Luci, 
Ensi, 

Ovi, 
Cymbi, 

Exercise 701. 

Falci, 

CapiUi, 

Cortici, 

Fistnli, 

Oculi, 

Myrti, 

Exercise 702. 



Campani, a bell. ' 
Basalti, basalt. 



Scon, 

Uni, 

Tri, 

Omni, 

Tri, 

Asperi, 



Febri, 

Vermi, 

Centri, 

Tri. 

Mnld, 

Mono, 

Tri, 

Poly, 



dross. 

one. 

three. 

all. 

three. 

rough. 



^fbrzn* 



foliate. 



Exercise 703. 



sacred; ^etaparUl^^ 
apoison. ^noc 

a gift fioent. 



amushnosL 

wood. 

a pea. 

a net. 

a style; a pen. 

Unuor dioik* 



fixniu 



Ught. 
a sword, 
an aeom. 
the tongue, 
an egg. 
aboaL 



ferm. 



sickle. 

hair. 

bark. 

a pipe; a tube. 

the eye. 

myrUe. 



romi. 




a hundred. ^ 
^f*- Ifolina. 






fluout. 



jever. 
a worm, 
the centre, 
three, 
many, 
one. 



many. 



Sfoge. 
fngal. 
* fkxrooa. 



►gamy. 



gon* 



Hexa, seven. ^ 

Octa, eigfU. 

Poly, many. 

Ortno; right. 

Oxy, actUe. 

Chilia, a thausaind. ^ 
Anthropo,* man; manhind* \ .v^ 

PWy, many. . $*^ 



* AnthropogUt b a name given to an animal baring a Umgus like a i 
Pofygbly haTUg or coDtaismg mmny tongues or UmgtiagsSf 



MS 



/AKALmCAL MARtTJLL. 



Alti, 
Cendf 

Hydro, 
Oxy, 

Nitro, 
Uni, 
Poly, 
Omm, 



Geo, 

Orycto, 

Poly, 

Tri, 

Fami, 

Navi, 

Astri, 



Corm, 
Flnmi, 
Paralleb, 

P?iy.t 

Mono,t 
Hiero, 



'red* > grade. 



EXKKCISE 704. 

Homo. 
Hetero, 



waUr. 

fdtre. 
one* ] 



the earth, 
afosnL 
many. \ 
three. \ 
9moke. / 
aMp. { 
a star. 



M.I 



acid' > gen* 



genous. 



Cosmo, 

Geo, 

Theo, 

Phymo, 

Patho, 



the same* 
another; dif''\ 

ferent. 
theioorid. 
the eardi. 
a god; deUy. 
nature, 
feeling; pas- 

sion» 



geneoiMt 



g9°y« 



gnomy* 



gnoey. 

gyn. 

gate. 



geroiu* 



Exercise 705. 

All, 

Crini, 

BeUi, 

Squami, 

Crnci, 

Lani, 

Mori,* 



awtng. 

hair. 

war. 

a scale. 

a cross* 

wool. 

manner. 



gflvons* 



a ham. } 

a/eather. J 

a parallel. ^ 

many. 

one. 

holy ; sacred* , 

wiitdf or vase. 
a vessel. 

man' 



Exercise 706. 
geroQS. 



^gram. 



Ahemo, 
Anoio,§ 
Anthropo, man 

kind 
Astro, a star. 
Auto, self. 

Aero, the air. 



Poly.t 

Pseudo, 

Mono, 

Paiito,t 

Auto,t 

Tele,t 

Exercise 707. 
Anbmo, 
Aj!veio,§ 



many, 
fake, 
one. 
aU. 
seU^ 
afar. 



graph. 



graphy.l 



wvndi or vase. 

,j a vessel. 

Anthropo, man; mankinds 



Astro, IT 

Astheno, 

Aero, 



a star, 
debility, 
the air. 



logy-! 



* Morigerousj literally, bearing, or exhibiting (an obliging) manner, L e. obedieiit; 
ohwqaioQS. 

t Polygraph, an instrument for multiplying cq)ie8 of a writing 'i — Pantograph^ 
an instrument for copying all sorter of designs ; — Autograph, the writing of one's selfy 
' i e. a pezBon's own hand writing ; — TeUgrafh, an instramont, ok oontriTanoe fijf 
transmitting news to a distance, liy means of signals. 

X Polygram M a figure consisting of many marks, or lines ; — Mxmogram, a chv^ 
actsr consisting of one, or more letters, interwoven. « 

^ Angio, not only applies to a vessel of the body, as a vein or arteryi bat, also* to 
a seed-vessel hi a plant. 

n This general distinction prevails in the application of graphy and Ugy .* the lbr« 
mer figni&i a description, or history of a thing, the latter, a logical iroatise or #^ 
ones. Thus anemography, is a description or historyoi winds ; anemaHogy^ the •ei' 
ones of the winds. Wherever these words, in the Exercises above, have either of 
these significations, the prefixed word will be printed in small oapttaub. 

It Astrology, the science of the stars, L e. ue pretended science of jndgfaig of theii 
ittfliiences, imd of {nedicting future events by observmg them. 







AHALTTIOAL MAHUAL. 




Sl» 




Ezxrcise 706. 




Adbno, 


upland, 
ahook. 


Adeno, 


• gland. 




BiBUO, 


BoTAiro, 


a plant. 




Bio, 
Bracby, 


Ufe. 

shorts concise. 


'i^v^-?A 


short; eondse. . „, 
theskulL f^- • 


Caco, 


evil; had. 


Chiro, 






Chiro, 


ike hand. 


AlfOBLO, 


an angel* 






Exercise 709. 




Chalco, 


hrass. 


Concho, 


ashdl. 


' 


Calco, 


chaUc. 


Cyrio, 


a capital leUer. 




Cosmo, 


the world. 


«ro*.i,xr Cosmo, 
S'^P^y- Dactylo, 


the world. 


kgy 


Choro, 


a place. 


afinger. 


Crypto, 


secret. 


Crypto, 


secret. 




Crtstalo, 


a chrystal. ^ 


Etho, 


manners ; morals. 


t 




Exercise 710. 




Cam, 


fairjheaidtfid.' 


Etio, 


a 'cause. 


' 


Chrono, 


time. 


Chrono, 


time. 




Enigmato, 


a riddle. 


\<^v^- ISS:"' 


a riddle. 


•logy 


Epistolo, 


a letter. 


true origin. 


Ethno, 


a nation. 


Ethno, 


anadon* 




Gloes, 


a comment. 


Gbss, 


comment. 


4 




Exercise 711. 




Gltpto, 


engraving. ^ Grnomo, 


a maxim. 




Geo, 


the earth. 


Geo, 


the earth. 




Hiero, 


holy; sacred. 


«—.l,« HiBRO, 
S'^P^y- HiSTORIO, 


holy; sacred. 


•logy. 


Hktorio, 


hiskn-y. 


history. 


HORO, 


an hour. 


HORO, 


an hour. 




Hagio, 


holy. J 


Hymno, 


a hymn. 






Exercise 712. 




Hydro,* 


water. 


Hydro, 


water. 


'. 


ICONO, 


an image. 


IcONO, 


an image. 




LiCHENO, 

Litho, 


lichen, 
a stone. 


■^^^- &"' 


JUh- 
a stone. 


logy. 


Lexico, 


a book of words. 


Lexico, 


diction; words. 




L£XI,t 


a word. 


Neo, 


new. 






Exercise 713. 


/ 


Logo,t 


a word. 


Neuro, 


a nerve* 


Mto, 


muscle. 


Myo, 


a muscle. 


Mytho, 


afahle. 


- graphy. Mytho, 


afahle. \ logy. 


Micro, 


smaU. 


Metro, 


a measure. 


Metallo, 


metal. 


OSTEO, 


a hone. 



* Hydrography 9 a description of bodies of water, as bays, lakes, &c : — a]so» tiM 
art of making charts of the sea. 

t Lexigraphy, the description, L e. the art of defining of, words : — Logography, 
the art of word writing, I e. a kind of printing, m which each type represents a word, 

27 



aio 



OrOio, 

Ort'ctOi 
Oembo, 
Pahto, 
Paum), 



4xuaxnoAL luimiLZ.. 
ExxBCUS 714. 



ri§^; carrecU ' 

fouil 

(morgan. 

ott. 



Ortho, 
Uranov 

Noso, 
Paleo, 



righi; caneeL ' 

ihekeawH. 

fossil. 

n strpcHi* 

adhsase. 

OfMlfM. 



logy. 



Pbahno, 
Psendo, 
Phtsio, 
Poly. 

8XLBN0» 
SCBRO, 



S|tBVO0i| 

SideiOy 



Scift, 
Strato, 

TSSTACEO, 



apsdim. 

faUe. 

nature. 

many. 

tkemoon. 

a scene; view. 



solid, 
iron. 

sk&rt; concise, 
shadow; sketch, 
an army. 
sheU. 



ExEKcnx 715. 
Patho, 



grapby. 



Pseudd, 
Phtsio, 
Poly, 
Onto, 



EXSRCISE 716. 



gTRfhy. 



steering / dis- ' 

false, 
nature, 
many. 

a bemg; existing 
substance. 



i«w 



Geo, a mountain. ' 

Sarco, flesh. 
Necro, dead. 

Manto, divination. 
MI5RRAI.0, a mineral. 
Testaceo, sheU. 



logy. 



TiRxtmATO, sculpture. 
Topo, aptaee. 

Zoo, 
Tachy, 



an animal, 
quick ; concise. ^ 



Phtto, a plant. 

AuTOBio, life of one's self 
Chromato, a color. 
Christiano, Qiristian. 
Stegano, a cipher or se- 
cret character. 



Exercise 717. 

Toxico, 
Vermeo, 

Zoo, 

Exercise 718. 

Phtto, 
Demon 0, 
^.^v,r Archjeo, 

Eucbo, 



apois&n. 
au»rm. 
overmuch, 
fire; a burning 

fever, 
anammtd* 



uplanL 
an evil spirit, 
ancient, 
aflmoer, 
prayer; 
turn. 



logy 



logy 



FossiiK), 

SlfTOllOf 

CkunAf 



Exercise 719. 



afojfsU. 
an insect, 
lineage; descent. 



'1 Helmintho, a toorm. 

> logy. Dendro, a tree. 
) Herfeto, a replXle^ 



\ 



logy- 



* Alaoi wram. 



AXAhmOAL MAMITAIm 



911 



Aesto, 

Ptro, 

Tixxo, 



virtue, 
fire; heat. 
(he end; fiimxU 



logy. 



Amphibio, 

Thbo, 

Tauto, 



daubtfkl. 
Chd; dmniUyf 
the same. 



\ 



logy. 



EXKRCISE 720. 



Photo, K^fci. 

Pharmaco, a drug ; medicine. 
Phono, eouna. 

PsTCHO, the sotd, 
Terato, sonuthing tvon- 

derfidibomhasU 
Phenomeno, an appearance* 



logy. 



Phreho, 

Philo, 
Phraaeo, 

Te&mino, 



(he mind. 

kme. 

diction; expres- 

swn. 
a term J a name. 
Pneumato, breath ; air ; a 

spirit. 



lOgJT: 



Camfaho, 

Carpo, 

Ceto, 

C&usta, 

Ente&o, 

Macro, 

Meno, 

Techno, 



Magni, 

Grandi, 

Alti, 

Stulti, 

Soli, 

Pauci, 

Multi, 



Qnadii, 

Eqxd, 

Uni, 

Multi^ 

Tri, 

Quinque, 



Biblk>, 
Hydro, 
Icnthyo, 



a heU. 
fruit, 
a whale, 
a crust or sheU. 
the bowels, 
long; tedious, 
amonih. 
an art. 



Exercise 721. 

Pbly, 
Dodeca, 

Chilia,' 

Miild, 

Equi, 

Uni, 

Qninque, 

Decemf 



IhedzoD. 



logy. 



many. ^ 
twelve. I 
a thousand* I 
many. J 

hqtuuly. librale. 

one. ) 

five. > locular. 

ten. S 



great; big. 
grand; large* 

fooUsh. 
one ; alone. V 
a few. > 

many. ) 



four, 
equal, 
one. 
many, 
three.] 
five. 



a book, 
water, 
afish. 



lateral. 



lobate. 



lite. 



Exercise 722. 

Centi, 

Sequence. J^^*^* 

Tri, 
QtLadri, 
loquy. Mtdti, 
Plnri, 

Exercise 723. 

Demono, 

Pyro, 

Ido, 

Cosmo, 

Helio, 

HeHo, 

Exercise 724. 

Aero, 

Chryso, 

Dendro, 



a hundred, 
the belly, 
one, 
three, 
four, 
many, 
many. 



loqaj. 



litetal. 



an evil spittt. ^ 

fire. 

an image. 

Otetoond. 

the sun. 

the sun. 



latiy. 



later. 



the air. 
gold, 
a tree. 



lite. 



* *^The pretMiders to the art of necromancy had a way of uttering sonAds, asff 
they were formed, not by the organs of speech, bat deep hi the chest, or m the heftf^ 
and were thence called ventriU^[mists.** — Lowth^ m JsatsA. 



,212 



AHJkhXTLCAL VUMIW^. 



Nemo, a wood; a tree. 
Myti, a muide, 
Anthiopo, man. 



lite. 



£ntmiio, 

Argil, 

Omitho, 



an titMet. > 
clay. ^ lite. 
a bird. ^ 



ExKftciSE 725. 



Mono, one; alone. 

Deca, ten. 

Photo, light. \ 

Harmono, concord. I 

Nitro, nitre. [ 

Aero, air. J 



hogue. 



meter. 



Anemo, wind. 
Thermo, heat. 
Gaso, gas. 
£cho, an echo. 
Tribo, friction. 
Bare, weight. 



> meter. 



Calori, A«a^ 

Chrono, ^m€. 

Helio, ^ mn. 

Panto, oZ^ 

Pedo, afoot; apace. ^ 



Exercise *726. 

Electro, electricity. " 

Aceto, vinegar. 

> meter.. Pluvia, rain. ^ meter. 

Decs, ten. 

Hexa, six. 



Alti, 

Bactilo, 

Cranio, 

Geo, 

Horo, 

Hygro, 



Aero, 

Aleoro^ 

Arith, 

Biblio, 

Hydro, 



Geo, 

Coscino, 

Chjfo, 

Ono, 

Opkio, 

Oruitho, 



high, 
a staff. 
theskuU. 
the earth, 
an hour, 
moisture. 



Exercise 727. 

Micro, 

Plani, 

Stereo, 

Cvclo, 

Hydro, 

Ortho, 



metry. 



small; minute. ' 

plain. 

solid. 

a cycky or circle* 

water. 

right; correct. 



metry 



azr. 

meed. 

anumher. ^mancy. 

a book. 

water. 



the ear A. 
a sieve, 
the hand, 
a name, 
a serpent, 
a bird. 



* mancy. 



Pohr, many. 
Opnio, a serpent. 
Iflcs eqtuu ; the 

sam^. 
Ptoendo, false. 
Anthropo, man. 
Auto, sdf. 



math. 



Exercise 728. 

Litho, 

Necro, 

Oneiro, 

Hiero, 

Gyro, 

Exercise 729. 

Psycho, 

Pyro, 

Austro, 

Botano, 

Capno, 

Belo, 

Exercise 730. 

Poly, 

Auto, 

Logo, 

Theo, 

Mono, 

Nau. 



a stone, 
the dead, 
a dream, 
sacred; set apart, 
a circle; a circuit. 



>9uaicf 



the soul, 
fire. 

the Muthwmd. 
a plant, 
smoke, 
an arrow. 



mancy* 



morphqa 



many.r 
self, 
a word, 
a god. 
one; single, 
a ship. 



mathy. 
maton. 



> macby. 



MMAtmCAL XARirlL. 



St3 



EzxKciss 731. 



Psycho, 

Scio, 

Longi, 

Panto, 

Aero, 

Argo, 



Anto, 

Demo, 

Astro, 

£co. 

Zoo, 

180, 

Deutero, 



fmachy. 



aAadaw. $* 
Jong* manoas. 

aU» mime. 

the air. 



theJrgo.*\'^'^ 



9df. 

the people* 

a star. 

a house; a family* 

mnanimaL 

equal* 

me second. 



Equi, 

Poly, 

Tri, 

Quadri, 

Mem, 

Poly, 



ExEKciSE 732. 



nrany. 



Mono, 

Mel, 

Psalm, 

Khaps,f 

Com,f 

Trag,t 

Pan, 




9nej alone, 
honey; sweeU 
a sacred song* 
a sewing together, 
a village. 

entire. 



i 



ody 



tdy* 



ExE&ciSE 733. 



Cosm, 

Aut, 

Octon, 

Mnlt, 

Mono, 

Tri, 



Armi, 

Pleni, 

Omni, 

Mono, 

Poly, 

Hetero, 



the world, 
self, 
eight* } 
many* S 
one* } 
three* I 



orama. 
opsy. 

ocular^ 
phthcmg. 



Du, two ; double* 

Tri, three. 

Anthropc, mankind. 

Idio, peculiar. 

Mono, one* 

Theo, God; the ddty. 



EXEECISE 734. 



plicate, 
pie. 

patli^ 



•■( 



arms. 

fuU. 

aU. 

one* 

many* 

oppome; unlike. 



potent. 



phyllons. 



Penta, 

Bias, 

Anthropo, 

Ichthyo, 

Litho, 

Ophio, 



jfi,ve* 

impious. 

ahmnanbeing. 

afish. 

a stone. 

a serpent. 



pliylloiia. 
pbemy. 

Iphagovi 



Exercise 735. 



fe ftse.lv^'^ 



Biblio, a book, ) ^^^ 

Pharmaco, drug; medicine, ^ '^ 



* The name of a celebrated ship, in which Jason and his followera sailed in seaieb 
of the golden fleece. 

t Rhapsody, (literally, a sewing or patcliing together of odes or songsy) is nsedti 
signify a collection of verses making one piece, but without due or necessary depen- 
dence : — Comedy, (literally, a village song,) which now signifies a play, or farce, 
designed to correct, by 'representing in ludicrous style, the lighter eirors of mankind, 
was so called, because, in ancient Attica, where It arose, plays of this kind, — thea 
little more than loose and irregular songs,^ — were performed from village to village fai 
theeonntry; — Tragedy, (the goat song,) now a sober and dignified representation 
of great events, termioating usually in a fktal issue, was so named, it is said, becaapat 
the reward of those who were victorious in tragic composition* was a goat, 
«ras sMTiftocd to Bacchus. 



8M 

On, ^ <megg. 

Venm, a tDorm, ] 

Mnlti, ina$i9f» 

Memo, onti mdy» 



4IIAX.TIIIQAI. lUSVAI^ 






parous. 
poliBt 



Como, 

Metro, 

CacQ, 

Homo, 

ExzBCWE 736. 



the woM. \ ,wAv^ 

Qtit same ; like. \ P*^"V 



Tauto, ihe sOme. phony. 

Cyclo, the circle, pedia. 

Mtdti, num^. > partite. 
Quadri, four. > 

Qaadni,/wr. ped. 



•[pod 



Multiy many. 

Centi, a hmndred. i ,^^ 

Soli, one. fP?*- 

AH, a loing. ) 

Centri, the centre, petal. 

Penta, five. petaloos. 



Exercise 737. 



Tri, 

Tri, 

Vene, 

Anemo, 

Astro, 

Hygro, 



Bydio, water. phobia. 

Hippo, a horse. potamus. 

Neo, new. phyte. 

FhyBo, a leaf. phoroos. 

EXEECISE 738. 

Baro, weight. ^ Tole, . 

Hello, the sun. Thermo, 

Hydro, water. „^r^ Polemo^ 

Mcro, litOe; ndmU. '^^' Poly, 

Pyro, fire. Octo, 

Sidero, iron. } Mono, 

Exercise 739. 

Angio, a vase or vessel, spenoons. Ogdoa, 

Pluii, level ; plane. sphere. Hexa, 



feme. 
sectioQ* 



three. 

three. > 

a vein. S 

wind. ^ 

a star. > scope. 

moisture. ) 



the end; distant. ' 

heat. 

war. 

many, 

eight. 

one. 



opsh 



spermous 



Chmti, dU. 7 

Mnlti, many. S 

Hetero, opposite. 

Veri, truth. 



AIti, Mgh. 
Amu, armsi 



scions. 



Mono, 
Hydro, 
scian. Aero, 

similitude. Multi, 



eight. ) 
six. >stich. 
one. ) 
water, statics. 
air. static. 
many. 



Exercise 740. 



Uni, 
Sol, 
Luni, 



sonous. 
ene. ^ 
the sun. ^ 
the moon. > stice^ 



Anxu, arms. 



Pfailo, love. 
Anthropo, TnanJnnd. 
Pan, all. 

Tbeo, God. 
Bary, grave; deep. 
Homo, the same; wee. 



Exercise 741. 



tOBOVS. 



Mono, one. 

Mono, one. ) 

Foly, mawg. > theism. 

Tri. three. S 



Orphano^ an orphan* 

Penta, five. > 

Hepta, seven. \ 

Ceno, empty. 



tofHtf 

tone, 
tonowik 



tiopliy* 

tench. 

JMqpli. 



fym. 



{w*- 



f^S"^' 



lypc 






Z0«. fl.4 



Tii. 
Gnm, 









EaaDBcan 743. 



FIjtib 



Oomi. dl 
£qm, « Jkine. 



MANUAL, . 

ANALYTICAL AND SYNTHETICAL, 

or 

ORTHOGRAPHY AND DEFINITION. 

PkOIOIPAL Of THE MlCHANlGB* SoOIETT SCBOOL, NkW-YoRK. 

RECOMMENDATIONS. 

Of the xmmeroiui lecommendations of the foregoing work, with which the author 
has been favored, the followmg, (being all that oui limits will allow,) are presentedt 
as showing the views of that class of men, who may be supposed to behest qualified 
te judge of a performance of this kind. 



From tA« SuperinUndent of Common Schools for the City and County of New Fori; 

New York, fUth Fehrumy, 184& 
J. N. McElugott, Esq. 

Dear Sir* — I have exammed with much attention and high satisfaction, your 
'' Manual of Orthography and Definition," and cordJaUy comjrfy with your request 
in expressing my estimate of the work. Its plan has the merit of novelty, and hj 
its simplicity and natural adaptation to the purposes of both teacher and leanMr, 
would seem to be such an one as would develope itself to the experience of a practi- 
cal man, mtent on discovering the best means of imparting knowledge, on this intri- 
cate and Vnost'dblcult subject ; and yet I have never seen a work, me'elaonfiettUom 
of which appeared to me at once so intelligible and comideCe. 

Withm the compass of 200 pages you have condensed an amount of critical bftr- 
mation upon the phikisopfay of the English language, which I apprehend is not to be 
found ni any other smgle volume ; and your ext^ed analyses of compound woidf 
with their prefixes, suffixes and radicals accurately discrimmated ; and the syntheti- 
cal recompositlon of this multitudinous variety of words out of their elements, wtth 
all their synonymes, contrarieties, ambiguities and arbitrary variations, must have 
imposed an amount of labour, which none but an amateur in the profession of teach- 
ing could have patiently endured. I cannot doubt that your reputation as a phik^ 
l^ist will be enhanced by the publication of this work, and I sincerely desire that the 
)U8t appreciation of your utilitarian labors among the teachers of our common schools 
may obtain for this excellent Manual a diare of patronage, which shall adequately 
remunerate your toils, and at the same time contribute to the more th<»ough instni^ 
tion of the pupils upon subjects which I regard as lying at the foundation oi all edM 
scholastic acquirements. 

With high respect, I am yours, &c., 

D. Mkrbdith Rbksk, 
Supt. of Common Schools for the City and County of New Y«rk 



BIOOMIIBNDATIORB. 

Jhnm the JBim. Tkeo. FfKHgkuym^, CkanetUor of ike New^York Unheniiff, 

I haye examined with some can the ** Mavual of Orthooeapht and Dxiiin- 
ffioir,'' prepazed by Mr. J. N. MoSUh^ott, of this eity, and take j^eamre in com- 
nending it to the faTorahle consideration of the firiends of education. 

There is a. fond of good Mspei pcactioal wisdom and mtM anrangiment in thif 
woik, not often combined within die same limits. It will, I am peaaaded, greatly 
Ibeilitate the study of onr language ; and teachen, as well as leame^^ will find canse 
for thankftilness to the merit<»io6s author. 

THEO. FKELIKGHUTSEN. 

jrsipT#Ht,ll«r.lO,184& 



From the Rev, loatte FerriM, DJ),, President of Rutgero Female ImtiitOe, N. Y, 

I have examhied the xeoent publication of Mr. McElHgott, entitled Analytical 
Manual, with as much care as my other duties haye allowed, and haye risen ftom 
the examination with the conyiction that it is a highly useftd book. 

The worthy author has giym to its preparation much time and labor, and if used 
on his plan, it will fnmish clearer and sounder yiews of our compound and d erivativ e 
words than almost any other book I am acquainted with. 

L FEBRIS. 

New York, lUreh 29. 1845. 



Ftom the Commercial Advertieer, 

Manual or Oetboorapht and Dbvinition. By James N. Me£nigotL-*-'nM 
author of this book is well known as the able Principal of the Mechanics' Society 
School m this city. In this Manual he has explained the syst^n which he has em- 
fik^ed with such eminent sueceai, rendered it familiar and easy, and made its .great 
advantages apparent, by a series of exercises of a peculiarly instmctiye character. 

The late Ckmnty Snperintendent, our lamented cdleagne, at the examination of 
the school m November, 1843, expressed, to our knowledge, a ld|^ opinio^ of tha 
Ami^ine wtskHk prevafled, and said that hi his whole official experienee he hadlbond 
wm leaelier of the English language whom be considered supenor to Mr. McEU^ott. 

rSrom WUHmm Forreot, JSff., Frmctpol of the CoRegiate Seiool, N. Y. 

New York, March 11, 1845. 
To Jas. N. MoEujaoTTy Eso* 

Dear Sir^— Highly appreciatmg the importance of a dne knowledge of th» mat* 
tsrs presented in your '* Analttioal Manual," and perroaded of the superior ejooel* 
lance of the plan of instruction, which it unfolds, I no^ only ranploy the work my- 
■elf hi the Collegiate School, but, also, oheeifnllj recommend it to otham as a moar 
yafaiable text-book. 

WM. FOKREST. 



From the Baptiet Adwocaie. 

Manual, Analytioal and Stntbitioal, or OaTBooaAmT and DnrninoR. By 
Jaaies N. MeEUigott, Principal of the Mechanics' Society's School. New Torit : 
Merit H. Newman, 199 Broadway, 1845.— Havmg been for many yeais^petw 
itnally acquainted with the anthcnr of this book, we were prepared to expect the enri- 
dences of sedulous mdustry, sound judgment, and practical dull which its pages ex- 
hibit In this volume will be found not only the completion of the design aimed at, 
but most impetfeeUy reached, hi Oswald's Etymological Dictionary, Town's Analysisb 
and seyNal other woiks of the kind, but, also, soch modifications, additions and hn* 



provameofi of tlie dengn itseii^ as eioaot fiifl to raider it a fer better aafeatitiita 1 
any of these, for a knowledge of Greek and Latin in the study of Ekigiish orthogra- 
phy and definition, and a much more serviceable manual for the teacher in the bust- 
ness of instmction. One of the most valuable additions consists m tracing, m a sys- 
tematic war, the cotanezion between the primary and metaphorical meanings of 
wordi, — a design hitherto scarcely attempted in school books. The scholar who uutfa* 
Ailly studies it, will become critically versed in the formation and comparison of 
words, and will seldom be in danger of misi^lling a derivative, or nusunderstanding 
its proper meaning. 

From the Newark Daily Advertieer, 

The ANALTncAL ahd STNTasnoAL Manvai. of Oatboobafht amd D mwmmi fm 

By J. N. McElligott, Fri^ipal of the Mechanioi^ Society School, New Yofk. TUi 
is a book constructed on a true philosophic basis. The author, in one series of ezer« 
cises, takes the roots of the English language, and attaches in systematic oMer the 
affixes and suffixes, and a^ain, m other series, takes the compound words andplucka 
off all their borrowed garniture. Now he familiarizes the ktk to the word, and then 
he tutors the eak to it By tills chemical process of separaticm and combination, the 
true meaning is elicited. Nor is this a mere accidental excellence ; on the contrary, 
a large portion of the volume is devoted to Definitions. The student who takes it as 
his guide through the great field of words, cannot fail to be thoroughly indoctrinated 
in the rudimental principles of our common language. 

From Ret. Joseph McKee, Resident Teacher of English and CUutieal lAUrahtnt 
at Madame Chegan^s School, New York, 
I do most heartily add my testimonial to those already given in fkvor of " Tb* 
Manual of Orthography and Definition,'' a work which combines the rare ezoellen- 
cies of the strictest philosophical analysis with great practical utility as a school bodb 
It meets a want long felt in the business of the school-room, and in the hands of an 
intelligent and judicious teaeher, it will do more towards drillmg a class in a thoroa|^ 
underrtanding, and a nice discrimination of the nse and value of words as the inatn^t 
ments of thought, than any other |^ook I have ever read or used for that purponn 
The importance of this brajich of Academic study is too much overiodEod : otterty 
so. And hence the failure in acquiring a thorough knowledge of the higher branch- 
es of science, results more frequently than \a generally supposed, from an imperfeet 
eariy training of the young mind m the right use and powers of words. This txxik is 
admirably adapted, in my ophiion, to cqrrect this evil. And it is my shicere widi, 
that the 'toil, skUl, and philoigophic labor of the mgenious author, may meet their 
fkill reward. 

JOSEPH McKEE. 

From Messrs* Hubbs and Clarke, Prindpdls of Collegiate and Commercial 

School 

New York, April fS8,lS45. 
After a somewhat carefVil examination of Mr. McElligott's ** Analytical Manmall* 
we are convinced of its surpassing excellence as a means of acqoiring a thwoogh 
knovried^ of the En^ish language. By its beautiftd and perfect system of analyu* 
tion and uistruction, it teaches the derivation, orthography, and even sipiifieatism 
of words in a shorter time and more pleasing manner than the usual methods of ar- 
bitrary spelling and defining can admit of, 1^ any possibility of application. 

We have introduced the work into our own School, and we ccndlally commend H 
to the notice of Instructors generally, as a book emmently fitted to form the basis ot 
a thorough English education. 

ISAAC G. HUBBS. 
GE0A6E W. CLABKB. 



aacoiaaarDATioiri. 

#Vmi Dr, Pmntrmif Prnrntl •/ PmiUe School No. 8, tmd AooockOo JPrfwfo* 
of the MdU Normal School 

The " Mannal of Orthomphy and Definition'' by Mr. McEUigott, PrinoqNa of 
die Mechanic!' Society Scbool of this city, is a work of lingalar merit It ezhibiti 
in tabalar forme the radical words of the langraage, with their meanings and the 
modificatioDB they undergo in import and form, by the Tarious prefixes imd suffixes 
with which they are nsaaily coropoonded. The constant practice of thus analysing 
words and deducing their signification, is an excellent exercise for iminoving the in- 
tellectual powers, while at me same time the learner is aoqmring an extensive and 
accurate knowledge of the vocables of the language. It is earnestly hoped that the 
use of this wori^ will henceforth entirely supersede the irksome and stultifying plan 
of acquiring octhography and definitions, by committing to memory columns of wwds 
iiram a dictionary alphabetioaily arranged. 

DAVID PATTERSON. 

New York, May 9th, 1845. 



JProm Jooeph McKeen, E$q,, Principal of PMie School No, 5, and Aoooeiato 
Principal of the MaU Normal School 

I have examined with interest, a work entitled " Manual, Analytical and Synthet- 
ical, of Orthog^raphy and Definition, by James N. McElligott" It is, m my judgment, 
an unprovement in etymological exposition upon the best works on the subject — both as 
to the tabular arrangement of analogous wordi, and as to the manner of teaching by writ- 
ten exercisee, and cannot fail to be of great utility to such especiaUv as have not studied 
the I^atin and Qfeeik Classics. After the scholar is made famihar with the meaning 
of those inseparable particles, usually denominated bom their position prefixes and 
•affixes, it is surprismg how an accurate acquaintance with a oompaiatively 
few radical words will furnish a k^ to the literal meaning of a great number 
of derivatives. This bode has an extensive vocabulary of radicm words, and 
the necessary rules for combhiing them ayntheticallyf with those particles and 
other addenda, ihot enter into the language. Almough, fiom the anomalies 
of our language, it is' difficult, and, perhaps, impossible to give many rules of genaraL 
apidication in orthography, yet, even in this pai^ralar, Bur. McE. has accomi^isheNd 
•onroch that his book ought to be used m all schools. 

May, 1845. JOSEPH MoKEEN. 

I concur hi the above opmion. LEONABD HAZELTINE, 

Puk. Sek No. 14. 



New York, May 13, 1845. 
The « Manual of Orthog^phy and Definition," by James N. McEUligott, for th« 
use of schools, is, in my opinion, a wwk of great merit It embraces a regular ooorst 
•of instruction in orthography and definition, by which the minds of pupils may ha 
successfully disciplined, and a ready, free, and correct use of words acquired. The 
value of the book vHll be readily appreciated by every enlightened teacher, who, in 
the discharge of his duties, has felt the importance of jBuch a work. Long since un- 
p f onee d with the neceaslty of a suitaUe woik of this kind, I am glad it has fallen into 
such competent hands. I riiall recommend its adoption by the Trustees of this 
school, and hope soon to see it in all our schools. 

S. DURAND, 
Principal of Ward School No. 5, llth Ward 
To James McISUgott, Esq. 



I have examined with some care a work entitled *' Analytical Manual," by Mr 
MeSUigotty a manual evindBg the leanung and research of no ordinary mmd. Ita 



raiteoZ cbaracter, in iny Mtimatioft, nuikee it a dWdemtum that cannot be too U^ 
ly appieciated, and which must lecnre to it that patronage and support of a disom- 
mff pubUe which its tabnted and indostrious author so well and justly merite. 

EDWABD MoILROY, 

Prirunpal •/ W. School No. 17, 
New York, Juno 93, 1845. 

I wiOinsly eononr in the above leoommendation. 

JOHN WALSH, 

lot AooL W. S. No. 17 



I have examined with some attention McEUigott's*' Analytical Manual," and do 
tMit hesitate to pronounce it a wori^ of rare merit. The introduction of this book into 
our schools will render comparatively simple and easy a branch of studythat has re- 
quired more time and labor than any other in the English language. The resolving 
of words into their elements, and definmg the parts separately — the modification of 
words by means of infixes and suffixes, are presented in this work in a more simple 
and philosophical manner than in any other that has come under my ebservatioa— 
and I have no doubt it will soon be introduced into all our best schools. 

JOHN YOUNG, 
Prm, of Eng. and Clasoieal Institute, No. 88 4th 8tN. Y. 



£!xtract from a Report of the Book Committee of the Tkaohbrs' Instttutb of the 
City and County of New York, and unanimouoly adopted by that body, Octobey, 
1845. 

The Committee, appointed to examine hocks published tor the use of schools, and 
to grre expression to the sentiments of this body respecting them, reepectAiUy report : 
ThBi they have carefully examined a volume recently published, a woik of great 
labor and research, by James N. McEUigott, Principal of the Mechanics* Society 
School, New York, and as the book has received their unanunous approval, they 
submit their judgment respecting it, with the following remarks. 

The purpose which it aims to accomplish is to enable scholars, in the course of their 
early education at school, to acquire a competent knowledge of the words composjng 
the English language ; an accpusition of the utmost importance in conmnumcating 
and receivmg knowledge ; but one which, if sought m the tedious and repulsive way 
of studying Dictionaries which is so often adopted in schools, could hardly be attained 
within the limits of human life. The author of this Manual, with admirable skill, has 
furnished the means, not only of rendering this acquisition attainable, easy, and at« 
tractive, but of bringing it within the compass of a vfery moderate space of time ; for we 
think that, with this \xnk. in his hands, the pupil may acquire all the knowledge 
which it communicates, without any hindrance to his other studies, within the usvud 
period of a common school education : whereas, the same knowledge obtained by 
other means would require the additional labor of years. 

We would not speak in disparagement of the work of Town, and a few others which 
have been composed for a similar purpose. We esteem them as useful treatises, fiutwi' 
consider the one before us as far more valuable than any which has heretofore ap- 
peared, both in the skilfuhiess of its arrangement, and in the fulness of its matter 
We therefore most earnestly recommend it to the attention of all teachers and pa« 
rents, as a school-book of mestimable value. 

/ (Signed) WM. BELDEN^ Chairman, 

D. M. REESE.. 
WM. A. WALKER. 
S. R. PHELPS. 
JAMES H. PARTRIDGE. 
JNO. W. KETCHAM. 
SAML. S. ST. JOHN. 



UeehmtM 8. School, Nw York, NM.im,lB45. 

HaTiag attenthralj penned jov <* Manna! of Orthography and Definitkra,** it ii 
with much pleamire that I ezpie« iny h%h opmion of its merits. No other woik 
that I am aieqiiafaited with, presents in so systematio and proflrresnvB a £gcni, the sub- 
ject whioh you treat of; and it setjnns to me, that the attentive study of yonr book 
must snpenede, in great measure, the necessity of devotmff that large amount of 
time and labor so generany bestowed on the elements of Chreek and Lirai, in a Bcho« 
lastic course, as it certainly exhibits most luminously and impressively the daasical 
etymologies of <mr language. 

A very slight ezammadon of your work must convince a teacher that the ar- 
rangement of the subject could not possibly be improved, and with regard to the prac- 
tical operation of the whole syatem of his&uction, I do not hesitate to sav, from the 
eemplete Boooees with which it has been attended m this school, that nothing can be 
mofe sat js flwt ory. 

Very truly yours, 

C. J. CONWAY, 
Vice Prin. of Mtehamaf S. School 
To James N. McEUigott, Esq. 



Manual, Analytical and Stnthstical, of Orthographt and Definition, by 
Jomes N. McElligott, Several woiks on this subject have been published before 
this one — all good — all very useful — but none so good as this ; which, I think, is 
about as comprehensive as any of its predecessors, and, at the same time, it has a 
very gre-at advantage over all ii them, in its deamess and simplicity of arrangement, 
(particularly in its exhibition of the prefixes and suffixes,) which every instructor, and 
especkdly every learner, knows so well how to appreciate ; — in short, after a delib- 
erate examination, I think it is the best work on the subject of which it treats, that 
has yet i^peared, and. I heartily commend it to every instructor. I shall immediate- 
ly introduce it mto my own school, in place of the wock whieh ha« hitherto been 
need. 

RICHARD CORNELL, 
Prin. of the Phiiological JnoUtute, N. Y 

4th Mo. ilUh, 1845. 



New York, May 21, 1845. 

The undersigned having carefully ezamuied McElli^tt's *' Analytical Manual," 
have no hesitation m pronouncing it a work of rare ment Li simpUcity and utility 
of arrangement, incorrectness of statement and definitipn, in accuracy and complete- 
ness of analysis, in congruity as a system, and strict adherence throughout, to the 
{dan of 'iiBtruction proposed ; this wori^ has few, if any superiors in the long list of 
school-books already before the public. 

SOLOMON JENNER, 
FANNING & CADY, 
GEO. A. ROGERS, 

Prin. St. Luke's School 
JOSEPH GREENE, A.M., 

Eng. and Classical Teach 
THOS. D. CAMP, 

18th St Seminary, 169 18th SI 



UI^OlOIBinUTKHMi. 



We lunra nwm fbr tiie budm only of UirftBowiiig patfunm iH 

Inigfa (rtaniBng,— who, with many othen, haTO ezMnmed and. 

wovk. 



•r 



REV. JOHN J. OWEN, 
REV. J. F. MESSENGER, 
MILTON C. TRACY, 
M. J. O'DONNELL, 
THOMAS FOULKE, 
WM. A. TAYLOR, (formeriy) 
R. liOCKWOOD, 
G. S. BROWNE, 
CHAS. WM. NICHOLS, 
R H. JENNY, 
AARON RAND, 
JAMES G. RUSSELL, 
HENRY SWORDS, 
BENJ. FOWLER, 



Ptmeipai of ComdhM ImCitiite. 

« •< Clancal School (BrooUyn). 

« '*' Meoh.,Inst School 

« « PiibUo School No. 11. 

'* " Ward School No 1. 

" *< All Saints' School. 

** •' ClaMBcal School, Ifooadway. 

u <c i^ew England Inatitate. 

« « City IttiUtoto. 

« « Claasioal Schod, Eaat Bnadwaj. 

« « ClaMical Sdiod, Poari St 

*' « CoL & Com. School (Brooklyn). 

<« « Englirii Academy, 6th ATeniM. 

<« <«8eteel School, BedfiDid St 



^#*^ ^ V 




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